What guns have you found difficult, if not impossible, to field strip?

When I purchased my pistols I always asked the person behind the counter to field strip the gun. I figured if they can not do it how can I? The only one I have a bit of trouble is with my Glock 44, I wish they made it with single take down lever. My 22lr rifles are a bit more complicated but not impossible when you learn some tricks which different for every one. I just brought a Ruger 10/22 and love it! However, after watching a YouTube video, when I took it apart the trigger assembly fell apart and I had to have a gunsmith put it back together, Later on he will show me how to do it correctly. What’s your story?

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Beretta PX4 Storm. Don’t shoot it very often so always have to watch a video to remember how to use the the 2 little tabs on the front sides of the trigger guard to get started.

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Mark III

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My first gun ever was a Gen 3 Glock 26. The first time I field stripped it, I managed to put the slide back on pretty much all the way, but with only one slide rail lined up. Jammed it up “something awful” and was afraid to use force to get it back for fear of breakage. Took it back to LGS like that for some help. Oof. That was back in 2005.

I’ve also done a couple of those semi auto pistol re assemblies where I forgot the guide rod/recoil spring or forgot the barrel.

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Now it’s hard to tell if simple field strip was ever hard to do. It’s a system engraved already.
But I recall the moment when I bought first 1911, already owning polymer striker fired handguns, and was surprised how crazy way 1911 was constructed. No simple tabs to be pulled, what the heck? :sweat_smile:

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Just watched “GUN-TIME with Brandon” video, I figured any field strip video that starts with bandaids, a rubber mallet, and a punch probably isn’t easy! :grinning: Interesting it can appear you sucessfully got it back together and it still not work right!
RUGER MARK III FIELDSTRIP (CLOSE UP) - YouTube

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I have two to present for your consideration. Number one is my Ruger MKII .22 target pistol. Anyone who has owned one is sure to agree. Getting the main spring housing re-installed is a frustrating effort of try and try again. I found a fix called Hammer Strut Support that fixes this difficulty.

The other is the worst firearm I ever bought, a Walther CCP (Concealed Carry Pistol). Aside from having the worst trigger, it has a piston assembly that is almost impossible to get back into the proper position. It has nicely reduced recoil, but that is the only positive point about that hot mess of a semi auto. Nothing will fix this and the best that you can do is to sell it.

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I have a bunch of the Ruger Mark series pistols and have been warned on pain of death NEVER field strip them, so I have not!

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That is similar to the Glock and other handgun take-downs. My PX4 sub-compact does not have that, it has a little lever that is turned down and pulled away from the frame. All the firearms I have purchased, I have either had the employee field-strip to ensure everything looked right inside it before buying.

I also always read the manuals and clean the firearm before going to the range, the the sole exception of my PX4 .45ACP. I bought that used at the FFL near the range I go to. That one I bought after a range session. After inspection at the FFL, including a field strip, I went back to the range to try it out. That is now my favorite handgun.

What guns have you found difficult, if not impossible, to field strip?

I had some difficulty the first time I cleaned a Glock. I borrowed a friend’s Glock to try out. It was the .45GAP. I did not like the recoil of that. It was the first .45 cal I shot and made me think I would not like .45 cal. Then several years later, I shot a 1911 - huge difference. Great trigger, easy to control recoil, nice handgun. I would have bought one, except I do not like external safeties.

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You are correct! The better news is that research shows many people with hundreds of thousands of rounds through them without disassembly…so I’m now following their example. :slight_smile:

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I don’t like to breakdown/field strip 1911 pistols. The take down lever is the actual slide stop. I sold my Kimber because that’s how I ruined my slide. I should’ve taken my time when removing it and it probably wouldn’t have scratched my slide. Oh well, a learning experience. I don’t regret getting rid of it but I believe I’m going to purchase another 1911 but be more patient with it.

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The absolute worst I have ever seen to field strip is the Walther CCP. if you don’t have their “special tool” they are near impossible.

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While the EMP 4 isn’t really hard to do, as Shawn mentioned above with the Walther, without the special tool it just is very difficult to get done.

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All my pistols are very easy to field strip. I feel like I got lucky because I never considered this before I bought them. The only gun that intimidates me is my Rossi 44 lever action puma hunter. After I took it to the range I got home and went to clean it. Watched the tutorials on commi tube and decided to do it the easy way that didn’t involve stripping the gun. Basically just cleaning the barrel. I didn’t want to break the thing.

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My Kimber 1911

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I have a mechanical background so, taking things apart and putting them back together has been a way of living. With vehicles it is not fun because I can always find problems! I am no different with firearms. Especially when you can make it better!

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Since I found You Tube has videos on almost every gun I have not had a problem. :+1:

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Remington Nylon 66 and Ruger MK pick a pistol. Both were often referred to as “RonCo Gun in a Box” when they came in in pieces. In 1988 dollars I would charge you $100 to assemble your $79.00 rifle and get paid all the time usually by some “helpful” son in law or other “Jr.”.

Cheers,

Craig6

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I’ve never been a fan of Glock’s take-down levers. Tiny. I like a bit more there and I have to put on a rubber glove to get any kind of traction. Maybe it works better if you have tiny fingers or something. I know there’s probably aftermarket this, an aftermarket for that, and an aftermarket for the other for any Glock part, but I just want something that works well out of the box for me, and that take-down doesn’t. It’s nice to have a good selection out there that does work for me.
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Always a fun surprise :joy:. I’ve definitely done that a few times.

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