The Warning about a Coronavirus Pandemic

I keep hearing about this from all angles. Some folks are in full on panic, others are in full on slumber mode. Like most things the reality is somewhere in the middle.

We won’t see death tolls in the millions, but considering that there aren’t a lot of ICU beds in hospitals it won’t actually take much to fill them up. That is bad not only for victims of COVID-19 but also regular ICU patients. This is what is happening in Italy right now.

I think as long as people take reasonable precautions (as laid out by the CDC), and in places where there is confirmed (or even suspected) outbreaks kick that up a notch (stay home from school or work for a week) we should be OK. We will probably see smaller flareups like in New Rochelle, NY today or Seattle last week, but the key is to keep the flareup small. At risk people should already be taking more extreme precautions.

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Did Corona Beer stock ever rebound from the mistaken identity? OMG. :roll_eyes:

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Surface to body transmissions are low, vs sneeze, cough, handshake etc to person are higher.

Help me with my list of surface risks, not in any order.

  1. Restaurant Menu

  2. Door knobs/handles

  3. Bathroom potty handles, facet handle, exit door handle/knob

  4. Chair Back when pulling chair from restaurant table (I love eating out)

  5. Gas pump / gas pump buttons ATM/Grade Selection

  6. Bible at church / Bread-Wine at church

  7. Grocery Cart Handle

  8. Food tray at restaurant, get order to go in bag

  9. If you forgot to clean your hands somewhere prior, Your steering wheel/cell phone

  10. Microwave/Fridge door/buttons at work

  11. Printer/Printer buttons at work

  12. Your phone at work, someone else could have grabbed and used it.

  13. This is a hard one to control, your kids! Especially if they are in day care or public schools. (This is #13 for a reason)

  14. Merchant credit card swipe machine, putting in your pin.

  15. Fridge/Freezer doors at grocery store

  16. To many things to list but everything in your hotel room at the expo. Bring wipes, don’t forget the TV remote.

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What is the status on the expo? Still a go?

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For anyone that missed it, Joe Rogan talks with a science guy about coronavirus and what to expect

Michael Osterholm is an internationally recognized expert in infectious disease epidemiology. He is Regents Professor, McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair in Public Health, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, a professor in the Technological Leadership Institute, College of Science and Engineering, and an adjunct professor in the Medical School, all at the University of Minnesota. Look for his book “Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Deadly Germs” for more info.

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Yikes, Bummer :frowning:

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Just a personal opinion here…

It seems to me, that the precautionary steps are more inline with slowing the spread, so as to 1. reduce the number of very sick, high risk patients to numbers that can be handled by medical facilities at anyone time, and 2. slow the rate of spread to give pharmaceutical companies time to develop related treatments and vaccines.

IMO, reduced public attendance, increase personal hygene regimens, and self imposed traveling restrictions seems like a reasonable strategy to slow the spread. Please keep in mind, that many of the deaths were people with lowered immunity who either didn’t receive proper treatment or refused proper treatment. Additionally, many of the people panicking might be those least affected by the virus, and more of a risk as a carrier to infect others with lowered immunity.

Unfortunately, we haven’t gotten much of an overall picture from the media, as they seem to focus on the more morbid, sensationalized, or politicized stories than in informing about the “end game” of the current quarantines, treatment, testing, affects (signs and symptoms), and personal hygene suggestions that might be more helpful to the population as a whole. Where are the PSA’s?

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I think I read it can live on surfaces for 9 days

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So let me get this right,

THIS YEAR the regular old flu infected 19 MILLION people in the U.S., hospitalized 180,000 and has killed 10,000 people IN THE U.S…

The WuHan flu has infected 1500 and killed 36 in the U.S. as of this morning and the whole frikking world is coming to an end PLEASE!

The numbers will go up for the next 2 weeks then drop down to nothing following that. The life cycle of the virus has already been established in China. Build up for a week spike for 2 weeks and decline there after.

This time in 2 months the world will have forgotten about the Wuhan flu (unless you died from it) and the stock market will hit 30K.

@Jane2 3 days on plastic and stainless steel. 3 hours on copper, 6 hours in an air chamber.

Was your hands, wash your A$$ and don’t let anyone sneeze on you. If you get the flu, drink lots of fluids, pound vitamin C (Personally I prefer getting my vitamin C from Spicy V8 and washing my insides with Vodka), eat chicken noodle soup, get some sunshine and get over it.

Cheers,

Craig6

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Again, it is going to impact the economy way more than peoples health.

Disney World closed today. Huge huge hit to revenue. Will they keep paying people?
The trickle down of this business alone is astronomical!

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One - I LOVE Disney World and it sucks that it’s closed. :frowning:

Two - the economic impact is going to be huge. All of the people staying home from work/school/travel will have a huge impact on the economy.

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Just imagine how the economy would be if it were not in the amazing and great shape it was in at the beginning of this!

FYI: We are watching Disney Cruise Line close, as we vacation with them a lot, watching for HUGE sales for sailing this fall and winter!

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Ahem. I take offense to this… :rofl:

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Exactly. This flu thing is the least of our worries. Government control is. Can’t take our guns, but they can crash the system. Folks, buy more ammunition.

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Thanks for the update. I’m not one to stay glued to the news and read the report I did a week or more ago.

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That must be awesome that you can OCD like me and listen to the news! That’s the main topic here at home and in our family. (Yes, even some sleep has been lost over it.)

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So, today HEB (Like Kroger only Texas owned and with no union) was a mad house from the pictures I was sent. Lines all the way back to the deli and meat departments.

Here in Johnson City, TX the local country grocery store had stocked shelves and not a lot of people shopping. When I went up to cash out at 1 of the 3 cashiers, there was no line at any of them.

They had about a 1/2 shelf of toilet paper, no other shortages.
For some reason when we American’s get the flu we most go to the bathroom a lot or something?!

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@Fizbin OoooooMG, Nancy and I went to Aldis today and it was a bit of a madhouse. People rolling out two carts at a time just loaded up. (no big sales going on).
Same on the inside, people getting in each others way and more double carts, all 7 check outs were open, I have never seen that in the 8yrs. I have lived here.
And guess what? All toilet paper and paper toweling shelves were empty. :scream:
I am honestly disappointed in my fellow cheese heads at the panic. :roll_eyes:

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You and me both, and the government is playing right into all of this causing more panic.

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