Who taught you to shoot?

#1

My dad and my grandfather took me to the outdoor range with my brother when we were 6 and 7. We shot a .22 long rifle.

I learned to shoot a shotgun in high school - made the mistake of not seating it right in my shoulder and was bruised for days :rofl: I’ve never made that mistake again!

My first time shooting a handgun was with the local citizens academy when my kids were little. Loved it and I was hooked!

Who taught you to shoot?

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#2

My grandfather got me started with BB guns in his garage. My first time shooting a real gun, which were handguns, was when I was about… :thinking: 7 I think. I remember shooting his .45 (have no idea what model gun it was, wish I knew) and his snub nose revolver, which I assume was a .38. Probably S&W but can’t say for sure. I just remember it had a hammer and I don’t think I hit a single target…
It was almost ten years later that my guitar teacher took me out to shoot. This time I was shooting rifles and handguns. But it was more of entertainment that teaching me how to shoot.
Funny thing is that my grandfather always told my mom that I was a good shot (I used to shoot pennies but granted I was 7 and it was practically point blank range in a garage) and I’ve probably gotten better. I just can’t hit much with a bolt action rifle for some reason. Perhaps it’s recoil and the heavy trigger… :thinking:

#3

For the most part I taught myself. Upon purchasing my first handgun and acquiring my CCW, there were several things I did before ever going to the range. I did a lot of reading & watched a lot of videos. Anything & everything I could get my hands on. I also read every word on everything that came with the handgun in the case. All of it including the copyright notice. Then I learned how to field strip & reassemble the handgun. Did it so many times I could do it blindfolded. Next was a lot of dry fire to get comfortable with stance, grip, sight picture, etc. All of this & more before ever firing the first shot. I was taking it very seriously starting out, and still do. Later on I did take a 2 day training course. I have thoroughly enjoyed every aspect along the way.

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#4

My dad and granddads, and the Army… started with a .22 and a pie pan working down to poker chips at 20yrds iron sights… had alot of fun with it and learn alot of patience from it… so I kept going with it!

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#5

I had the best teacher available to me at the time. Myself

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#6

Boy Scouts. We started with BB Rifles, then moved up to .22 rifles and eventually a variety of handguns and rifles. Then a few years later, I learned to do it the right way with the military.

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#7

My Mom’s 2nd husband (late 80’s early 90’s). He was an avid hunter growing up in rural WA State, and also a WWII enthusiast. Among the many rifles he had was an M1 carbine. Which is what he used to teach me how to shoot. Then we moved on to 30-06 and so on… Once I was comfortable with rifles we moved on to pistols. I’ve been an avid firearms enthusiast ever since.

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#8

My dad gave me a Crossman BB gun when I was maybe 6 or so, for Christmas. He had an old metal bullet trap set up in our basement, and I think I shot that pellet gun until New Years! Then it was on to a .22, then a break action 16 gauge, then a 30/06, and learned to shoot birds, and deer. Then I graduated from high school and joined the U.S. Army and I learned “tactical” shooting. When I deployed I was fortunate enough to receive training from the Green Berets we supported (we just pulled security for them, I don’t want people getting the wrong idea about my service). But those range days with them really made me more comfortable with firearms. I guess my point is, I never stopped learning how to shoot.

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#9

Thank you for your service, James! Shooting is definitely something you can spend a lifetime learning and practicing!

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#10

Sounds like a pretty good benefit from your mom’s second husband, @JGCoder! Wonder what he would think of the changes going on in Washington gun laws these days. :frowning:

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#11

Well, the Army wasn’t bad, I’m definitely a better person than I was before I joined! You’re welcome. Shooting is such a great pastime, you can never master it completely! There are so many things to do, long distance, self defense training, cowboy action, the list never ends! I’m going to try a biathalon this weekend if the snow doesn’t melt with the rain and temps we’re supposed to get this weekend.

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#12

My dad taught me how to shoot a rifle, my grandfather a pistol, and one of my uncles introduced me to the pain of a 10 gauge shotgun.

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#13

My first husband had several police officers in his family and they would take us shooting. I never liked it, always hated it until I got older. When I was ready to buy a gun I went to a range and took a class and learned how to shoot. When I wanted to learn to shoot a rifle, I hired my friend who is a NRA certified instructor and gun dealer. He gets me in more trouble! He gives me great deals and end up being too tempted!

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#14

I complete understand the great deals you cannot pass up, @TWeinzerl! I started working at the range for fun and as a great place to talk with like-minded people. When I told my mom I was going to work there, she said I’d be loosing money since I’d find too many deals I couldn’t pass up… She may have been right :wink:

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#15

First shot ever was 17 yo with a 357 magnum. Took the neck off a coke bottle at 25 ft. Had no idea how good that was. Navy was my nexrt opportunity. No teachers, just figured stuff out.

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#16

Dad took us hunting when we were very young. Like 3 or 4. I recalled walking in the woods behind him. He also let us fire the gun once using either a tree or him. Foggy. But my stepfather took us to the range to fire his Korean War era rifle Dad did most of the teaching. I got an air rifle when I was 12. The same year he gave us Remington 1100s for Christmas.

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#17

My Dad taught me to shoot when I was a little kid, he gave me my first hand me down daisy red rider when I was about four years old I think, I couldn’t even cock it without putting it between my feet and struggling to cock it, lol, and we shot the .22 which I still have, (an old mossberg bolt action with a feed tube). As I got older and picked up about every bad habit you could possibly imagine, I joined a gun club, started to shoot with many people, I YouTubed everything, it took a while to realize that the only way to improve your skills,is to shoot with people that are better at it than you are. I learned a lot on YouTube from Jerry Miculek believe it or not, it’s where I learned about training drills and proper grip. It’s very frustrating to try to break bad habits, don’t loose hope though, be the first one at the range, and the last one to go home. Good luck and God bless. :sunglasses:

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#18

My buddy Doug taught me. He was a friend of the family who grew up with my mom. He had a jewelry shop and his FFL. He got me into a local club and into skeet and trap shooting. I was drawn to pistols and am a decent shot, but surprised myself with long guns. My brief experience with law enforcement helped my handgun skills. I was a “range dog” and the firearms instructor for the department and me made good, quick friends. I’m still lucky enough to have Doug around today. I love watching him enjoy his retirement and hearing about his hunting adventures all across the country.

#19

Mainly my father but also in part my family (uncles, a couple aunts and cousins). While I would like to include the service the only thing they really taught me was how to keep a weapon shooting level when firing full auto. (If you have never done it, it is not as easy as it seems and does take some practice.)

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#20

My dad and grandfather. Started with a 22 long rifle and a 20gage shotgun at 6. I have always loved hunting and shooting. I love being able to teach my kids.