What is your plan, your setup to evacuate if needed?

#1

We all carry in one form or another, we all have some plan in place, some setup for home defense and such…

What do you have for you and your family if you had to evacuate and abandon your castle?

As seen in California from the fires, entire communities evacuating, your well equipped and prepared for a normal day, you have your plan for sheltering in home… What is yout plan if you have to abandon your home?

Do you have a series of totes loaded with water and/or water purifiers. Emergency foods, cash, tents, spare clothes, firearm lock boxes, extra ammo, etc. Perhaps a fireproof box with the primary personal papers, SSC, Birth Certificates, flash drives with back ups of important computer files, listings of all electronics and home funishings for insurance purposes…

Starting a couple of totes now and adding little by little as affordable, when the time comes, a quick packing and bug out to a safe place with a plan and knowledge you got all that you need not worrying about something left behind.

Show us what you got and your general plans. You may have something that the rest of us could utilize to better our own plans.

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#2

It’s always good to have a full tank of fuel as often as possible. I have a water filtration system, a renewable power generating system, my patriot supply food containers and medical supplies from aspirin to tourniquets. That’s a general start for us outside of what you posted.

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#3

Yep, i always fill up whenever possible, keep an extra 5 gallons of diesel on hand for my heaters or my van, should probably get 5 gallons of gas to have on hand. I have the 3 day supply of patriot food, I cooked up the food, in a survival situation, it was maybe 1.5 days of food not 3 days, all carbs, little protein. I’ve moved to building my own food packs along with some of the freeze dried.

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#4

I can speak from experience first hand, where I live if a catastrophic event occurs, we’re bugging in. For the last 10 years we’ve had many forest fires that have hit as we live in a canyon community and next to a large US nat’l forest.

The Rodney King riots in ‘92 had Marshall Law here in LA areas and the sights of rioting, looting, the city burning and smoke rising into the air were surreal.

‘94 we had the Northridge quake and first responders were overwhelmed. Power was cut off, water mains broke causing flooding, gas line broke causing mass fires and explosions, buildings/structures and freeways collapsed leaving areas of travel cut off. Lastly amongst the chaos, looters were wandering in packs hitting all the stores in our neighborhood all through the night and into the morning dawn.

Our home at the time was on a main street across from a shopping center and hunkered down and “circled the wagons” in front of our homes and neighbors by barricading our cars end to end across or lawns.

It’s “en vogue” to talk about “prepping for SHTF scenarios”, luckily we learned from our Mom who had that mentality after the Sylmar ‘71 quake.

So we had our firearms to defend from looters, covered as far as stored water/food, first aid, warm clothes/footwear, flashlights, shelter/camping gear, and cash.

As the power was down ATMs and CC/EFT transactions were unable to process.

We learned from that event that communication was lacking so CB/2 way radios were the first on the list to be added. The realization that bugging out would be impossible. LA area traffic is bad enough day in and day out so bugging out will not be an initial option.

I’d also say get foldable maps of your surrounding areas, I have Thomas guide map books that I keep with my kits.

We have a get to the “Alamo” plan then head out with supplies for bug in situations.

Bug out situations are load the “wagons” and head to the meet point. We make sure the vehicles have their own basic kits, are in good repair, fueled and “ready to go”.

We have trucks/SUVs to move people and supplies. These can be loaded in minutes, fortunately we work from home so we literally are staged and ready to go generally.

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#5

Up here where I am at, and some others on here as well… its a 50/50 shot… we have stuff on hand… but we also have to take weather into account alot. Here wonter gets down to -60 some years and up to 110 in the summer… so when and how to boogie out is really the question… i also have 4 of my friends that are prepped aswell. So we meet at our ralley point and do a quick assesment of gear and move out

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#6

@KenM - thanks for sharing your experience, Ken! Sounds like you’ve had more than your fair share of experience with catastrophic events!

From your comment, I see a couple of huge take aways:

  • CB/2-way radios
  • Maps of the area
  • Designated meeting site
  • Having friends or neighbors who have the same philosophy as you do can be life saving
  • I don’t want to move to California :wink:

The last point was strictly for comic relief.

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#7

I agree with the radios, personaly I use these for my emergency radios.

I have a friend who programs them for FRS channels so they interact with regular 2 way radios. These have the added benefits of being duel band ham radios, so you can listen to NOAA, Emergency services and such that use the basic frequencies, listen to the HAM operators who in emergencies commonly handle emergency communitcations and such. They have built in FM radios, little flashlight, etc.

The extended battery packs for these can last about 72hrs of mild use transmitting and recieving, the charging dock has slots that allow you to charge the battery alone without needing the radio attached.

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#8

Thats a great idea… ive been looking at options, but i like this one the best so far…

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#9

Ive also been looking at small drones that have camera capabilities… use them for recon of areas while im moving my family…

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#10

That’s funny Dawn, there’s a few bright sides of where we live.

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#11

Please dontvsah that itscfrozen 6 month of the year… ill cry…

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#12

I read this http://bitly.com/2SrRtsN a while ago, it is a very sobering account of living in war torn Bosnia. I think it is a very important read.

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#13

I am with ya! I don’t even step foot in California and sure wouldn’t move there!

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#14

Id recommend against the drones, they require alot of maintenance, batteries, charging batteries, can be knocked out of the sky, and in a survival situations, good luck getting replacement parts.

A simpler tech that could give a good birds eye view and would not be thought much of is using a kite. Attach a FPV or wireless security camera to it, a light weight FPV camera that operates on 5v can be hooked to a cheap and light portable cell charger. Goggles or a basic reciever, if you have to bail, fast, bring it in quick or cut the line and go, $35 disposable system vs hundreds.

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#15

I have family with a large(250 plus acres) private property only minutes from me. There’s a cabin, with electric and a backup generator. Fresh water, and game. It is accessible only by atv or 4x4 truck/suv. Plenty of timber for firewood too. Most of my extended family would bug out there, so we would have some numbers, most of whom are gun owners and hunter/outdoor types. It’s in an area we all grew up, so, we are familiar with all the backroads, creeks, etc for many miles around. I keep a sealed case with ammo in various calibers for a quick grab and go. My family already knows to make sure we have a couple of handguns, and common long guns, mainly .22 and a 12 gauge. Even though my wife’s car gets better mileage, we would take my 4x4 truck for it’s greater utility, off-road capabilities, and if ever needed, it would be better for “pushing through” barriers. Also, a 6400 lb truck can take more of a beating than a family sedan.

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#16

Drones are pretty cool though, my friend and brother in law have some great drones that are amazing. I couldn’t believe the range and automatic tracking they can be set to. I have a cheap one under a $100 bucks with video and if I had theirs I’d probably take it, mine definitely not.

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#17

My only thought when i think of kites is hey giys im right here come and find me!!

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#18

Vs a drone that sounds like a swarm of angry bees. If i were to hear a drone overheard, if i powered up my VTX at full power, it would knock out your visual and you would be flying blind and likely crash.

Or, i could fire up my goggles with the spot antennas and use them as a directional beam to find you plus id be watching all that your watching including your return flight back home so I could see your exact setup…

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#19

I can see you and i are at different tactical schools… ill leave it at that…

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#20

To each their own, i just have concerns about such technologies and how they can potentially be used against you.

Just wanted to put out those concerns as something to think about…

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