Doomsday Today

#1

A catastrophic event happened RIGHT NOW. For conversation, let’s say the power grid fails and you have to survive for 1 year.

Where are you? (Work, home, grocery store)
Where would you go?
What would you do?
What do you have on you? Bug out bag?
What is your plan? Do you have one?

We recently watched a show about Doomsday preppers which sparked this conversation. We, the community, have talked about EDC, bug out bags, training techniques, etc. So let’s apply those topics in a hypothetical situation. What would you and your family do right now?

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#2

The only right answer for us would be to move to Louisiana with my country living family. Not sure how banks would work under that scenario. Also, how would we make it that far. Gas pumps won’t work without power. A lot of things won’t work without power. We definitely get hold of a generator for making coffee😏. Actually I’d go back to old school drip pot.

I helped dig a water well at my stepmoms in the deep woods when I was a teen. Since then they switched to city water. We’d just resurrect the well. They have gas. I’ve roughed it out there without electric for a couple of weeks growing up several time during ice storms. Army life training with survival training would help. Live off the land. Hunting, fishing and gardens. Right now we’re city slickers and probably would run into serious problems trying to stay in the city. We’d probably lose most everything. Bankruptcy would probably be the norm because how can you work unless someone manages to adapt? Most people don’t have resources. We need to build an emergency backup of water and food for sure. I’ve been thinking about this for a while. If I stayed here in the city I’d dig a well. Sewer is gravity flow (designed many of them). So there’s that option. We have a ton of unused candles (we’re Catholic :wink:). Our living area is on the second floor. We have a good view from the house. If schools remained open my wife’s a teacher and we’d continue income.

There would probably be a banking crisis that would cause a massive market crash as well. We have guns to protect ourselves and property. Solar panels would go up on the roof.

I’m just making this stuff up as I go. Can’t you tell.

#3

All hypothetical! No wrong answer but gets you thinking.
Figured I used power grid failure since that event would effect everyone. Something like a hurricane wouldn’t really effect me as much being in Wisconsin just as example.
I could imagine being in a city would be chaotic and limit resources.
I do like your experience with building a well. I wouldn’t know how to start a project like that. I would be more dependent on water above ground. Collecting, filtration, etc.
I do like coffee being a priority! :coffee: :star_struck:

#4

@Kelly. My property is on the lower elevation of our neighborhood near a major tributary. The dig would not be that deep. I’ve met people that have dug wells over 100 feet. The one I dug was only 35 feet deep.

But thinking more we live next to a wildlife refuge. It might be a good place to survive. Only thing is that all the other neighbors would compete for the same game.

#5

@Kelly I often ask people a similar question. I look to see how many people answer that they would head out here, rush over there, get with family somewhere. Or, how many would hunker down and wait out waves of confusion or worse violence. I do think each person’s situation is different, however, if I can, I will hunker down and work to survive as many waves of chaos or violence as I can.

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#6

Get to my family’s farms ASAP. Then get to work doing whatever needed to get done to keep cows alive, and set up security. I don’t know, if the power grid went down I think I would be alright. I like spending time at my land and the cabin at my family’s farm with no running water or electricity. Yeah, it’s not convenient, but you can make due, you just have to have the knowledge for finding a spring, and making a spring box. I would live semi nomadic.

Now if a nuclear war starts I’m just going outside and hoping it’s quick. I don’t want to live through a nuclear holocaust.

#7

@mdstanzel I would imagine you’d be in steep competition!

@MarkBrent absolutely every situation is different!
I think hunkering down is a good plan. Wait out the chaos for as long as possible before making a move. Especially if you’re in a higher populated area. Do you store anything at home if you had to hunker down?

#8

I try to keep stocked up on non refrigerated food enough to last a month. Rationing would definitely be the norm. We have enough water for a week.

#9

For me, I’m thankful @James and I talk and make basic plans just in case. I work at cabelas. If a catastrophic event happened I would want to be as far from there as possible. Don’t want to get stuck in a swarm of people fighting over a sleeping bag or the last box of ammo. I keep a bug out bag in my car supplied with enough to get me home. We talked about a route Id take so we wouldn’t pass each other. Once home, either hunker down or leave to his family’s farm depending. I feel like we could survive at home short term but not for the long haul.

#10

Some family of mine have a cabin in 250 wooded acres, with a private lake stocked with fish. Plenty of wild game, and a gas generator. I would siphon all the gas from my wife’s car, into my truck, and head for that cabin with all the guns and ammo we can carry. We(pretty much all the aunts, uncles, cousins, etc) could live out there for years between the cabin, campers, and guns. Pretty much every household has at least one hunter/outdoorsman, we have a vast majority that are good mechanics/carpenters. We all know the woods around the cabin very well, and we have an abundance of vehicles that look like they are ready for an apocalypse as they sit right now.

#11

Get home, bunker in place, deploy the solar panels and wind turbines, reduce my current consumption of power to bare minimums (not too bad now).

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#12

These types of conversations make me realize that I need more ammo and to build my AR.

And then I’ll need ammo for my AR. :wink:

The really hard part for me is that my kids are all adults and I’d have no way to get all three of them together - assuming cell towers are down.

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#13

Welcome Mark. I too will hunker down as long as it stays feasible. I have access to wild game and fresh water that will require boiling, but we would be ok. I don’t think if the power went out for over a month, society would break down to “Mad Max” levels.

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#14

That would be a problem, I’d just tell them where to meet up.

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#15

Please tell me this is what your vehicle looks like:

I think it’s great that you would utilize the strengths of your family!

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#16

There’s a slight issue with that plan, @James - I’ve talked it through a bit with the kids already. Do they go by mom who has the ammo and the defense or do they go by dad who has the land? It’s a tough spot to put the kids in. And now my daughter has in-laws to consider too.

Families are fun :smiley: At least I know my kids can defend themselves if needed.

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#17

Stay as far away from cities as possible. The violent crime rate is already high. Look at how riots develop cause there’s gonna be looters.

Without giving up too much detail. I have rallie points with close friends and local family. Travel in a group and have multiple routes all of them avoiding freeways and dense populations.

As for bugout bags those are great BUT you gotta be realistic with them. Let’s say it’s a 3 day bag. Could you drop everything right now and go 3 days trying to reach a checkpoint. I thought I did so a buddy and I decided to actually try it. We got off work grabbed the bags and headed to the woods knowing we had to make it to a certain point. It was an incredible learning experience.
More food for thought.

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#18

Absolutely! Great points! The first time I packed my bug out bag it was heavy! Definitely had to readjust. Right now, mine is a bit heavy but it’s doable and it’s packed with wisconsin winter in mind. -50° windchill is no joke!
Awesome you have rallie points and a plan!

#19

Yeah that is definitely an issue.

#20

That would be an interesting training experience, @Sheepdog556! Did you use GPS or compasses and maps?