What have you done recently to Prep, guns, gear, ammo, etc

What are you doing to today or recently to prepare, emergency foods preps, guns, gear, ammo, etc and how will it help you (reasons may inspire others)?

I’ll start off here.

After years of wanting, i finally have one, Harvest Right Home Freeze Dryer.

Making foods and candies for myself, friends, and family, to begin stocking up meats and more for long term storage without a freezer.

Ive done some candy/ice-cream loads to get familiar with the machine, doing my first big load which is mostly lowfat yogurt bites and some pistachio ice-cream in a rectangular brick form.

Next load will be shredded cheese and after that, likely a bunch of costco rotisserie chicken and hamburger…

Hope to sell Freeze Dried Candy as my state allows up to 20k in sales from Cottage Laws to pay off my machine and fund more preps.

Will also be prepping candy for long term and candy is usually ignored for prepping. Reason for candy, if you have ever skipped a meal and done exercise or work and you started shaking (low blood sugar), you need some sweets to recover. Rice and beans or other preps wont be as convenient or good as a few skittles and freeze dried candies usually melt in your mouth vs being harder to eat.

Since I’m off work for a work injury, I have been PT on my own time (aside from at the hospital), helping at a friends gun store. As such, I try and pickup a box of ammo or 2 each time I go even if its just .22lr.

Gardening being another prep, planted a vine type green beans, not for me but for my wife as i dont really like them, super 100 tomatoes to be planted next…

Joined a local range, just under 2 weeks till orientation, practice is prepping…

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I planted a vegetable garden to help reduce inflated food costs, especially in preparation for a potential Stalin-esque (Brandon-esque) food shortage because of the diesel/fertilizer crisis.
I’ve also been working on fixing up my bicycle for getting around.

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Been prepping since 2005 so we have most everything, hoping for 100 pounds of potatoes to store over the winter and sprouting some for seed in the spring.
If you are looking for seeds I would suggest, Heirloom and Open Pollinated Seeds - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds - Heirloom and Open Pollinated Vegetable, Flower, and Herb Garden Seeds
Don’t forget the hand tools. :slightly_smiling_face:

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Wife got a head start in the gardens this year, had about 200 plants started indoors in milk containers. Our living room has a lot of glass and made a great greenhouse :smile:. I got next winters firewood split, got to finish the pile but about 6 cord done. Will be adding to our off grid electrical system.
Lot of other possibilities coming up, just watching to see what they’ll be.
Was planning on buying another house, but staying put in familiar territory for now and keeping up to date on real estate, taxes, and the “feel” of the country. Want to do another RV trip, but “biden did that” to fuel prices and homie ain’t playing that game.

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image

Mine are still on the hoof. Fresher that way!

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I have posted a link before but we have many new members. :slightly_smiling_face:

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Great idea! :+1:

For me, prep has been a lifestyle since I discovered that five pounds of beans cost less in the long run than one pound of beans purchased five times. And that having more than my immediate needs on hand whenever practical provides me with resilience to ride over rough spots (personal or societal) with less hardship than “just in time” procurement. So, fifty years maybe.

I am not a food producer nor an industrial manufacturer. For stockpiling, I rely upon the marketplace. For “end times” (i.e. marketplace will not be back for years), I have concentrated on the accumulation of skills and tools to allow me to improvise what I need from materials at hand and subsist upon wild foods available in my area. If those preparations — in conjunction with my ties to community — fail at a critical point, I die. So it goes. I cannot stockpile daily needs for a lifetime.

Advances in solar have been a boon, because the end of “energy” (i.e. grid power & motor fuel) has always been a soft spot in the ability to prepare for long-term disruptions. Even with that, when the panels or the batteries or some electrical component or the powered device fail — doing without may become the new circumstance. Reliance upon only one’s own brain and two hands is a lifestyle we have not practiced for a long time.

The only change to established practices which I’ve made recently is to increase depth of ammunition inventory to support skill maintenance for a longer period — turns out a year or two wasn’t enough.

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Bought me and my adult kids hand crank radios.

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I taught my daughter how to make thermite.





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An interesting vid on testing the Life Straw.

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Great to see! I have a couple of these.

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Mounted a M60 on my front porch.

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yep ours too [protein on the hoof]
only problem is piglets keep showing up and told wife that 20 will be the winter limit

Mike

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Photos?

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I bought a freeze dryer middle of last year. I do a lot of eggs. I can fit 18 per tray. 72 per batch. I cut mylar pouches in half and put approximately 6 eggs per with a 100 cc oxygen absorber. 'Have sausage egg casserole in machine now.
I also do 4 Sams roasters at a time. Yogurt, skittles, hamburger, taco meat, grapes, pineapple, strawberries, ice cream sandwiches , peppers and more.
Guns, ammo etc… have been taken care of long ago. Berkey filters of 2 sizes, life straws, Katydid and a homemade Berkey type( much cheaper). 8 fuel cans and 2 50 gallon barrels of gas for generator. 2 100 lb LP tanks for small stove. Solar panel to recharge 18650 batteries for lights. Plates to help defend it.
1year of all necessary medications. Trauma kit for gunshot or knife wounds. EMP shield for generator. On and on and on. But the most important is mindset. Skills in your head are the only survival stash that no one can take from you.

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And just last week bulk corn jumped from seven dollars a bushel to nine dollars per bushel at the local farmers co-op. It was $5 per bushel before the china virus was released.

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I bought a bottle of pretty decent Brandy.
You know, for medicinal purposes.

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I recently purchase some hermetically sealed ammo cases. Depending on caliber, each holds 1,000 rounds or more. After filling each one I put a few moisture and oxygen collector packets in each case. This is my “reserve” supply. For ammo I expect to be using in the nearer term I used my wife’s vacuum sealer, putting 100 rounds of ammo (in their retail packaging) in each vacuum sealed bag. I am able to read the box labels through the bags, making what I want easy to retrieve.

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I like these barrel blocks (below) as they also block the chamber, for safety and accident prevention. Got a couple.

I use em, but not for dry fire; for dry fire - there are many other options made specifically for that.

Not a fan of dry fire; except fire for the range, when aiming at target only; just too risky to dry fire at home.

Available in multi calibers:

fortunately the Idaho Pasture pig is a grass eater + some pellets
summer is great feed to pork ratio
winter we have chopped hay ,fermented barley , and hog pellets
looking at chopping sweet corn stalks and fermenting them

Mike

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