The Last Samurai

It’s a reflection of the times - I guess - when “Made in America” means made in a foreign country. My Glocks are Made in Austria but my workbench is filled with tools made in China, Korea, Vietnam, and Mexico. My clothes come from countries whose names I can’t even pronounce. Sri Lanka, Ceylon, … Now this. Howard Beale said it best in Network, “I’m mad as hell. and I’'m not going to take it anymore!” Thank God our woke movies are still made in Hollywood. At least I think they are.

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There’s plenty still made here, we just can’t compete with labor costs, and in a lot of cases "Made in America " means quality materials that cost more. “Made in America” has a price some people don’t want to or can’t pay. Now, lets look at a couple specific items…firearms, for example, all at Academy. A Glock 43x Gen 5 can be had for $450, whereas a Sig p365xl is $630… in this specific case, if you were in the market for this size firearm, one could easily chose the Sig, and get an American firearm with more capacity, with or without manual safety, and night sights. The issue is that sometimes the Glock is more comfortable and appealing for one reason or another, but a big thing at my store is that they are cheaper. Many people don’t even look at the sig case due to price difference ove other brands. Price is not always the reason, obviously, because some American manufacturers have competitively priced offerings such as the Shield Plus, but one size doesn’t fit all… You could also easily sell your Glocks for American firearms. Americans are part of the problem when talking about the lack of "Made in America " products and the migration of domestic companies overseas…the never-ending pursuit of the best deal, the desire for instant gratification when making a purchase, the desire to be fairly compensated… look at what UAW is doing across domestic auto manufacturers, the impact countless lawsuits are having on domestic companies, the basic consumer wanting gutted prices, and manufacturers forced into paying lowst bidding contractors for bottom quality services to meet prices. Its a domestically created problem that people are eager to cry about, but not willing to resolve.

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I thought most of the Glocks sold in the U.S. for the last decade or so are made in Georgia?

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Searching up the forums indicates made in USA Glocks have US made slide, frame, and barrel, with other parts made in Austria.

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That is probably true of a significant number of “made in America” products. U.S. made vehicles including those made by U.S. owned companies are full of parts from Mexico and Asia.

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That is such a thing with vehicles, it’s a known %.

For a couple of the best selling vehicles ever, Ford and Chevy half ton trucks, they are right about 60% domestic parts content currently

Which isn’t terrible, they are over half domestic parts and are made in the US

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Not terrible but it does show how dependent the ever smaller number of U.S. owned and operated manufactures are on foreign sourced products and materials.

I’d also say that with the slide, barrel, and frame of Glocks being made here and the pistols being assembled here one could argue that Glocks are just as if not more American made than a Chevy or Ford made with 40% foreign parts.

The world isn’t so black and white anymore. For better or worse we will have wait and see.

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This should say it all

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You’re missing the point. The United States at one point made its own ■■■■. We didn’t depend on everyone else to constantly help us. With the introduction of demands like i listed previously, we are losing that "Made in America " pride and product, and it’s no one’s fault but our own. Businesses are in business to make money. If they can’t make enough to keep the lights on while paying for American materials and labor, why would they not have it done somewhere cheaper with cheaper materials? But to say "Made in America " isn’t "Made in America " anymore while actively supporting foreign based companies isn’t helping…it’s hypocritical at best. If one is going to talk the talk, at least start trying to walk the walk.

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What I’m saying is that it isn’t so easy to walk the walk these days because made in America doesn’t mean what it used to. Not only are a significant portion of “made in America” products not made in America anymore but significant portions of the American workforce doesn’t have the same work ethic and skills as past generations.

So a lot of made in America stuff isn’t so made here anymore and the quality can often be just as junky as the stuff made in China. I will buy made in America when the quality matches the extra cost but I am not going to pay extra for a pile of foreign parts assembled by unskilled labor here just so I can feel more patriotic.

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How can one expect improvement when effort is not supported? Work ethic, lack of skills, not 100% "Made in America ", and lack of quality are all byproducts of the consumer demand i mentioned earlier as well. “You get what you pay for” has come to fruition…We say “■■■■ ain’t what it used to be!” but we don’t help the situation. We might as well just lay down in our graves, so to speak, and come to terms with the fact that truly "Made in America " is gone forever, or at least until we as a country are ready to do something about it.

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I do my best to buy American and buy local. I am willing and able to pay more. Somethings I just cannot find “Made in America”. I also will speak with the manager/owner of smaller stores, and that has made a difference. I have walked out of places after stating I am not buying anything because it is all made in China. National chains are a bit different, but I still avoid Chinese products if I need a particular item. I believe if enough of us speak with our voices and wallets, they, too, will change.

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Show your American pride by wearing a lapel pin made in china :thinking: :astonished:

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And don’t forget one of the biggest drains on companies making things in America…CORPORATE TAXES, something Trump was trying (and successfully) to do, luring companies who left America because of the huge tax bill for operating here.

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It is part and parcel of the global economic world we live in. Much of the things we buy from Amazon and other retails are made in and shipped from all over the world. Lots of food items are imported from Mexico and Canada. I have a cousin who is a farmer near Council Bluffs, IA. He produces two crops a year – corn for ethanol and soybeans for export to China.

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So was Joe and Hunter Made in Ukraine or Made in China? :thinking::grinning:

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Parts from both places assembled in America…we’re paying well for that one…i like to think about it as the knockoff Snap-on of politicians…half the quality at the same price as an authentic one…

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It will say on the slide. USA or Austria. If you order a custom Glock from the Glockstore in Nashville you can specify a USA or Austrian Glock. I did.

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While this is mostly true there is also the fact that “Made in America” doesn’t necessarily make the product better than “Made in Austria” (as an example). The initial track record for the Sig P365 was spotty and although they have corrected things, the perception for some is still there. I have friends who swear by the Sig and those who swear by the Glock. It’s relative. But unfortunately with Bidenomics it’s a reality.

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This is my point. In many cases the ability to buy American made quality products is long gone. I buy American when I can and we source our food as locally as possible. But in most cases buying a fully American sourced and made product is almost impossible to do. I am also not going to spend more for American stuff that is lower quality when I can get a higher quality foreign product for equal or less money.

What is more American, a Chevy or Ford made in Mexico or a Subaru or Hyundai made in the U.S.?

And by the way isn’t Sig Sauer just a U.S. subsidiary of a Swiss company? How exactly is a U.S. made Sig more American than a U.S. made Glock?

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