Small of the Back Carry

New carrier here and getting the wife into a class soon. She has a S&W 64 4" and feels that SOB is right for her. I know this is much debated. Any input on the merits, or demerits, of this position?

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I would suggest she gets her own account for the community and have conversations with some of the other Women here like @Dawn and @Zee for starters. There are a lot of great resources here and most of them are more then willing to try and help others both new and old.

Oh before I forget welcome to the community.

Don

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A fall or being shoved back with a hard strike on the weapon, into the spine. Possible extreme injury. Also there is the rotation of the weapon to bring it on line and ready to fire. Last, if a foe knows to look or discovers small of back carry it can be a difficult retention fight - or loss of control without warning and used against the owner.

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I second what @DBrogue and @CHRIS4 say, @AJ09.

I’m glad she’s interested in carrying. And before I started here, I was carrying the way she likes. Until I found out more of the mechanics of carrying there.

A couple of things to keep in mind - where do you live? If it gets icy at all and she falls on the ice… Will she be walking with kids? Does her draw flag any of the kids? Can she get a good grip on the firearm where she carries it?

I would definitely invite her here and let us answer her questions. An outside opinion may get her to consider things she wouldn’t consider if you bring them up.

(Off topic - why is it that we don’t listen to our significant other about these types of things as much as we’ll listen to an outside opinion? :thinking: )

Welcome to the Community, @AJ09! I love it that your first question is to help your wife be safe! :heart_eyes:

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My granddaughter also carries SOB, and it has all the challenges already mentioned. She does because she’s a tiny whip of a thing and its the only successful concealment spot on her slim frame that really works. We’re exploring other options but for now, she’s training to accommodate SOB’s challenges.

My husband also sometimes carries SOB, but more often 4 o’clock, it depends on what he’s carrying and wearing. In my husband’s case, his lifetime of military and competitive shooting experience means I don’t worry about his draw and retention skills. For someone without his depth of experience, a LOT of practice and training needs to occur for SOB to be something I’d suggest.

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I appreciate all of the valuable feedback. The concerns noted are one’s we’ve discussed with a friend and much more experienced carrier. I did sign up the wife when I joined even though she does not have her permit yet. I’ll encourage her to join the community and seek input, particularly from you very experienced female carriers. Thanks.

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sweet! - cool that you’re both taking this as an education to be pursued :smiley:
when she gets on, have her wave us down so we’ll know who goes with whom :grin:

I would also recommend a post that @zee or @ Dawn can point you to about slowly getting used to carrying . In steps. There are also quite a few lines of intimate apparel that can help provide some help in helping to minimize the profile of your carry weapon. Also get the gun you like THEN figure how you are going to carry/conceal it. @Dawn or@Zee or a bunch of people can poi t her s
You want her to feel safe which helps keep her safe while, she becomes used to the CCW life.

I don’t know if the 2 of you are USCCA members or not (if not you should really consider it). But I won’t try to do that as the site will do it. But you can learn from from many here. Also anything Beth Alcazar’s and Kevin the Editor for the magazine is solid gold and almost always good.

Every single time I have had to have an interaction whether I “won” or not I have, l have left feeling like I have had the best anytime. How many times have you interacted with a company and felt like you got superior service and made a possible friend.

There are even people on this and the companies private forums I would welcome to my home as my friends. Also just as a note, I don’t like people much, I have 4 personal friends, and my wife calls me " the nuclear option" when companies give her the run around.

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@AJ09 I own that same revolver. I am a big old dude… 250lbs, 5, 10 and mid 60s. having carried this and a model 10 and a Taurus model 82 all similar shape and size. This is a heavy load to carry there in the 4 inch model @ 2.+ Lbs. With the cylinder width it also can create a pressure point. Just thinking about the ergonomics of the gun. Now going to a 2in will allow some wiggle room. Just some thoughts to consider. Have her sit in a solid back chair and place a full bottle of water at the carry position and see if she feels discomfort. Just out of box thinking to see if she can deal.

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There were times where n the past when I was plain clothes or off duty when I’d go SOB. It is fine if you are standing a lot but awful sitting and driving. I would defer to the ladies for ideas.

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@Kelly @Lacy @Nancy might have some ideas … :grin:

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Thanks for sharing your experience Joe. We bought this with the initial idea it would be for HD only. She has begun considering carrying since I got my permit and have carrying with increasing frequency. We’ll get a holster and see how it rides on her frame. We are not averse to considering a 2" model if the 64 is too much (always looking for a reason to get another firearm :grin:).

Dennis - I only found this forum after signing us both up as members. As I have been carrying more frequently for longer periods of time getting covered became more important. I just kept thinking that you don’t drive off the lot in the new car without getting insured first. This should be even more important.

Mike - Thanks for your input.

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I never carry small of the back for basically all of the reasons already mentioned.

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My friend did this, he thought it was a new great idea. He fell down over a year ago now he has had to forced retirement, has permanent spine damage and lives on medication for pain. I highly suggest and recommend do not carry a firearm like this. Please do not do it.

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As others have said: small of back carry, or 6 o’clock is OK until you fall or get bumped hard. Can get ugle from there.

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@Zee, there must be synchronicity in the air! I just ordered a holster with left-handed carry so I could carry it in SOB. The company made a mistake and sent me right-handed, and I called them to let them know I wanted the left-handed for sure and why. The owner is an ex-policeman and he apologized, of course, but strongly recommended that I rethink the SOB carry idea, because it’s so easy to get injured when you’re carrying a big hunk of metal right over your spinal cord. He said he has known several people in his life and during his time as a cop who have injured themselves for life because of SOB carrying. You can fall down, have a minor traffic accident, all kinds of ways to harm that spinal cord with the gun sitting in that position. I was dead set on SOB carry, but he convinced me that I would be better off if I carried at the 4 or 5 o’clock position, rather than the 6 o’clock. I value being able to walk and not be in crushing pain when it’s so easy to avoid this kind of injury for this reason. So I’m a new convert to not carrying SOB, and I’m going to try the 4 and 5 o’clock positions instead. It’s really interesting that y’all are talking about this just when I talked about it with the ex-cop! Synchronicity! Interesting!!!

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@Robert8 your example is exactly what we talked about. Thank you for sharing and caring. I’m sorry for your friend, and glad I was warned before it happened to me…

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@Nancy Well Nancy, thank You for having an open mind. I know a lot, been through a lot, did lots of living so maybe I speak from different perspectives

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@Robert8 although my L5-S1 injury came from an entirely different incident, your statement of your friend could have been me - but it happened Ten Years Ago and I have been on pain medication and Dr.'s management ever since. (Good surgery by the way, uncooperative nerve damage &/or constriction.)

People do not realize how valuable their spine is until it’s had a significant impairment and they, at some point, start counting up all the things they can no longer do.

Thanks for the confirmation!

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I understand and respect all the opinions given here opposing S.O.B. carry.
I have had a permit for over 25 years and carried everyday all the time, except when in bed.
I have tried all types of carry excluding ankle.
S.O.B. is absolutely my favorite.
For 20 of those years I’ve carried .45 Colt Compact and then a full size Government model.
Taking advantage of today’s loose fashion standards, I wear large untucked shirts.
While bending over , I’m sure my weapons don’t just print, they bulge.
I don’t care, I could open carry in my state, but choose to avoid offending others.
I have been involved in a couple accidents where I was propelled backwards through the air several feet and landed on my weapon . I always carry Cocked and Locked and landing on my weapon I had no accidental discharges, but must admit my back was sore for several days.
I have had people tell me that they could not tell that I was carrying but only knew so because someone else told them.
I recommend a S.O.B. holster as close to horizontal as possible for a quick, natural draw.
You need a little angle for retention but not a whole lot.
Like any carry , a quality holster will serve you well, forget about the cheap ones.
I know I am a minority voice because there are so few offerings in S.O.B. holsters.
No one can tell you what is best for you, you have to experiment for a while.
While some seem to think S.O.B. is awkward or slow, I feel pretty confident I’ll have a green dot on my target while others are still digging around in their pants.

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