I'm a new cop...do I need USCCA?

I’ve been a USCCA member for several years since getting my CCW permit. But I just became a cop and don’t have or need the CCW permit any more. Is there any reason I still need USCCA membership for legal protection?

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I would think so, because you can still act in self-defense as a private citizen. That’s a much different situation than acting as a police officer. Your police training may or may not apply in the same way, and your department may or may not have your back.

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If it wasn’t affecting my finances I’d keep it, especially in today’s climate. You can’t have too much coverage.

Stay safe…

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Congratulations @Paul155!!

Your USCCA Membership would be able to assist you when you are not required to carry for work. I would suggest looking at what the department you work for covers as far as the use of a firearm and if you have to carry when you’re not at work.

No matter what, you are VERY welcome to stay in the USCCA Community!

Stay safe @Paul155!!

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I was always under the impression that once you are a law enforcement officer, you are never “off” duty. So in that sense you are never a civilian. I could be wrong but it could make a difference depending on what state you are serving in.
However, in today’s environment and the fact you could be out of a job in weeks as soon as the police force is defunded, I would keep any coverage you have and USCCA is the best for my money.

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I’m with @Sheepdog556, “You can’t have too much coverage.”

But yeah, you need something for your private life anyway…

Here is something you might not be knowledgeable of,

USCCA would cover your wife, kids, whomever, until out the door…

I am right, right [haha] @Dawn? Are is it property line…

Regardless, whatever you decide in your best interest, hope you stay here on the community @Paul155! && Thank you for what you do professionally.

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I’ve heard different thing from different people, a double check on what the specific department requires is definitely worth it - both for USCCA membership benefits and for general job requirements.

Not exactly whomever :stuck_out_tongue: IF @Paul155 has to carry for work and is able to utilize the work provided benefits, it would definitely be worth it for his spouse (if he’s married) to get a membership for her protection.

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Congrats, tough times ahead - I am fairly new and not a paying member yet - if I had that choice I will stay - you never learn enough

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I am sure the USCCA can still serve you

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They do in more ways than they even realize - very informative good advice suggestion and some great people which has the most value

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Kevin Michalowski is an editor of the USCCA and a police officer. I guess a question is, How much help does the department offer you, in the fashion of a lawyer and support for a legal situation? And would you like to have another back up of legal support?
I hope the best for you! Be safe! I joined the Marine Corps in 1988 to get into Law Enforcement. I had trained for 4 years before then to get into law enforcement but, when I got out of the Corps medically, that was that. As I usually say to everybody, Practice, Practice, Practice!

Kevin’s last name edited for correct spelling. ~Dawn :slight_smile:

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God bless and protect you sir. Thank you so much for becoming a police officer. Your bravery and dedication to our Republic are appreciated and admirable. You have my gratitude and respect sir.

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Please remember, the USCCA member benefits cannot be used for police officers or security guards in the line of duty. There is a separate type of program (not offered by the USCCA) for police officers and security guards’ legal protection.

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As I remember there are professional associations that supply enhanced coverage for peace officers who are members. These vary from state to state if I recollect correctly. Your union or a co-worker should put you on their trail.

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I could not find how to spell Kevins name, thank you!

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