Frog lube issues

My Son (retired Marine) is a big time gun guy. He started using Frog Lube a few years ago. Recently he’s not been shooting must so his weapons have “sat” a good deal. Now he is seeing problems with them gumming up and not functioning properly. A quick internet search shows a lot of similar issue. It seems if you shoot/clean a lot you’re ok, but if a piece is stored this stuff turns to taffy or maple syrup😳. Just a heads up folks. If this is on a piece that doesn’t get fired often you are looking at a potential issue…

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I have heard of this gummy residue happening on several other forums.
I use Hoppes, seems to do a great job.

Larry

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Frog Lube always presented like a solution without a problem to me.

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I too use Hoppes #9 and a decent oil. Always works. My Son has learned (painfully) that newer isn’t always better. As noted above, sometimes it’s simply a solution in search of a problem

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My choice is “Gunfighter Lube” This product holds up great even when I fire my AR 15 ;500 rounds hot. Does not gum up at all and keeps my gun lubed all day when firing hot.

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I have a kit of frog lube in my big box of gun cleaners and lubes. I have not used it. Why not? Frog lube is a commitment. There are a lot of people who are very happy with Frog Lube and from all indications, it works very well. BUT you hear a lot about people who’s firearms gum up and dont function. Now, on to the commitment. Frog Lube is not a product that you just pick up your gun and oil and grease up your gun with it just like you have in the past. There is a process to remove all old oils and greases completely before applying frog lube, and there is a process for that as well. If you follow their process, it will still “gum up” a bit, but the amount on the firearm will not be enough to impede functioning and once the firearm is used, the frog lube will turn back into its natural non-gummy state. So if you want to try frog lube, get the lube and the degreasing kit and follow the process. If you try to just run it on top of the old oil and grease, you will run into issues. If you dont follow their directions and leave too much on the gun (guys who run their BCG dripping, I am looking in your direction) you will not like frog lube.

But by all indications it is a great product. I really want to try it out, but that means picking a firearm and committing it to Frog Lube.

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CLP Break Free - great stuff, can be used to clean and lubricate. It is magnetic too, so spreads out along the surface.

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I understand all the bio-based lubricants suffer that same issue of gumming-up when stored for long periods. I, too, had initially thought they sounded good. I then researched them and discovered the unpleasant underbelly. As Brad stated, it is a solution looking for a problem. Unfortunately, it is the problem, kind of like a doctor writing prescriptions, the “cure” comes with side effects at times worse than the problem.

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I’d strongly encourage you to look up “Frog Lube issues” before trying it on anything you really want to work. A lot of folks are reporting problems. To me, frankly, why bother? If you have a known product that works well, why mess around with an unknown and interject yet another variable into your systems functioning?

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I use breakthrough clean battle born .

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A number of years ago I did a stint in the hydraulics industry when bio-fluids were evaluted. You know, the EPA and spotted owels and other such motivations. I have avoided bio-oils since (except for on my salads). Bio means Bio. They degrade &/or go rancid. When they do, they are no longer good for the things you would like an oil to be good for.

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Does ethanol stand in this space? Everything I owns runs much better since going to E-free fuels.

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Sort of but not really, alcohol being a by product of fermentation. Ethanol has approximately 30% less energy by volume than gasoline and less lubricity as well, generally speaking.

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Great stuff if you don’t like your face or weapon.

My experience:
Picked up a Beretta M9 years ago. I carried one before.
I have a couple of 92s with thousands of rounds through them.
I cleaned the M9 (new) used Wilson’s Combat grease ran a CQB coarse (1000 rounds) went to a show was told of the AMAZING Frog Lube. Bought some. Cleaned the weapon followed the directions used Frog Lube. Went to the range put 100 rounds (147 grain bullets Federal) down range.
The weapon felt ‘tight’ and before the next mag I racked the slide wiped off the excess Frog Lube and loaded the next mag. Four shots into the mag and a weird discharge the next thing I knew was the slide hit me in the face chipping both front front teeth. After I wiped the blood off my face. I picked up a tire-n-true 92fs. Inserted the mag and finished the mag.
Called Beretta after showing the weapon to a gun smith.
Beretta sent Fedex to pick the weapon up at the range. ??
In 48 hours I had a new M9. I sold it that day.
Only conclusion is Frog Lube caused it. Beretta would not confirm but I had to have two teeth fixed.
Riddle me that…!!!

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