Draw time from concealment

As I been working on my speed and precision shooting, I been wondering how fast do I need to be ? Using a shot timer today my times are around 2.5 seconds with splits at .38 seconds. I’ve read the national average is 1.5 second from first draw.

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No way to know how fast you “need” to be unless and until, God forbid, you need to draw to use the firearm.

No, the national average is not 1.5 seconds. For actual people who conceal carry, from concealment, to hitting on target, it’s not that fast, I promise

A good general goal is 2.00 seconds to react, draw, and fire for 1 hit let’s call it an A zone at 5 yards. I’d wager most who carry regularly and shoot semi regularly are in the 2.00-2.50 second range, and I don’t mean that one perfect execution high water mark they get when it all goes perfect on the range, I mean consistently repeatable, from concealment in actual daily clothes, going “from the beep”.

The faster folks are in that 1.5-2.0 range, and only serious people and/or professional types are likely to be 1.0-1.5 in actual daily carry clothing and gear.

You aren’t doing bad at at all 2.5, keep working on it and aim for that 2.0 mark.

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I agree with 2 seconds and accurate shot.
Whenever you are in self defence situation you mostly need to focus on decoy, movement and seeking for the cover. There is no reason to risk fast draw standing still.

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Remember the words of Wyatt Earp: Speed is fine but accuracy is final.

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Agree with the most important aspect being accuracy.

John Correia (Active Self Protection) often lists a “standard” of 2 seconds for civilians, 1.5 seconds for professionals (aka LEO), and 1 second or less for competition.

That means clear whatever concealment (or retention for a duty holster), draw, and fire 1 accurate shot. I don’t know exactly what he uses as the reason for those times, but they seem like as good a benchmark as any to aim for. Watching his videos he will often mention “if you had a 1sec draw, you could draw HERE but if you have a 2sec draw then you have to draw HERE” and it’s interesting to see that the faster your draw is the more options you have if you get into an encounter.

You will find that the more you practice, the faster you get. And if you stop practicing for a while and test yourself again you have regressed, but a little bit of practice will get you close to where you were before. So make sure you practice regularly to keep up this perishable skill.

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Hmmm… do you draw on a drawn gun? :thinking:

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“Wait your turn”

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Never draw on a drawn gun, just like Nathan said, wait your turn! Remember you only have to be faster and more accurate than the other guy!

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Those who have watched much of Active Self Protection will have seen a time or three a defender successfully drew on a drawn gun by waiting their turn. It’s just another one of his catch phrases

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Faster and more accurate than the guy trying to draw and shoot you.

:grinning:

Your times are good, speed up your time slowly, and keep your accuracy. Then increase your distance. Rinse and repeat.

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Agreed. It’s not a duel.

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I practice my draw often with a laser gun. I really haven’t timed myself but I am extremely comfortable with drawing my pistol, extending, getting the front sight on target & Firing. I went to the range yesterday but unless I get a private bay, I don’t draw at my booth. I do fire the entire magazine at a rapid pace to ensure I am hitting metal which is 15" away at my range. Tried to upload a video but it didn’t work. 18 rounds from my new Canik with 18 hits in 13 seconds { that was the length of the video}. Slow is smooth & smooth is fast. I also practice dropping mags & reloading as well as jams. Yesterday I had a few faulty ejections with my Glock 26 but I was shooting crappy reloads

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I suspect many LEOs practice less than many civilians.

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People who get to practice drawing and shooting together should consider themselves lucky. Where I am, ranges’ policies are against even starting from compressed low ready, have to practice draw and dry fire at home.

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Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.

Sometimes, you gotta put away that timer and focus on technique.

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Three PDs qualify at my range. Other than two individuals, the only time we see any of them shooting is the week before qualification. And, BTW, they can shoot for free (we don’t charge them and the PD gives them their ammo).

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** HOW BOUGHT YOUR RANGE ** Scott’s statement is a little to strong but the point is practice carefully **

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Realistically the average will be in the 2 second range, because of clothing and situation.

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I shoot at the Shawano Gun Club an outdoor range with 5 pistol bays with concrete wall in between and you can practice how ever you want safely. Many times no one else is there. :+1:

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Another related topic if you have not been there yet. :slightly_smiling_face:

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