Chicago Laws on Firearms and Knives? Discussion on Cook Counties silly laws

I was reading through a Chicago ordinance from July 2nd of 2010 trying to see if it would be okay to move there again. I recently acquired a few things like knives and firearms. I got a glock 42 with lots of trimmings for concealed carry and a microtech double edge knife which could be classified as a switch blade. After reading through I found that the limit “laser sights” which unfortunately is part of the only light I could find with a holster for the 42. Also, it looks like cook county had a section that banned the possession of a switch blade despite a new law for Illinois making it legal to own in Illinois. I was curious if this specific laws would still apply in cook county or if it was updated since the new law in Illinois. The light is more of a frustration and PSA than a question.
This is what I am reading for context:


Also if this is old and doesn’t apply anymore let me know as I am not a lawyer and I am very confused by what cook county deems appropriate. Lots of these things seem silly to me.
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Thank you also for that fine article; I saved it to read. I’m local. From what I personally read, humbly speaking, I read that for legal reasons, in Chicago:

The blade can only be two inches in length at maximum, the sharp end can only exist on one side, not both sides of the blade, and it cannot be a switch type blade nor spring assisted. I think I went through about five blades before I found one that is not spring assisted but opens very quickly with practice.

Among other restrictions, firearms cannot have a laser. So I opted to purchase a non-laser-ed one.

I sometimes carry mace type of gel spray (the kind which emits almost in a straight thin line, not a cloud), flash lights which offer strobe, and a laser light pen (not to use with a firearm, but just in case needed to deter an assailant). I studied Karate as a child, but need to get back into shape.

Stay safe, and healthy neighbor.

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The pdf in this thread states those under 18 year old cannot be in possession of a knife with a blade over 2" long, those over 18 cannot be in possession of a knife with a blade over 2 1/2" long. None of my knives would meet that description, as the shortest is, if I recall correctly, about 3 1/4". My two EDC knives are not spring-assist, but flippers, and open quickly and easily with one hand. So you were a “karate kid”, not the “Karate Kid”? :grin:

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Thanks Dave17; Especially for that clarification, on the 2.5". I think that can make a big difference, because some knives which are of 2 & 1/2 inches, might offer more features, thus offering more choice and options for safety and staying within the “local legal” parameters.

LOL, I never realized that yes I was “a” karate kid, literally, but of course not “the” karate kid. One of my biggest regrets was that I did not continue those classes beyond only a few years, to reach and maintain black belt.

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Upon arriving home from dinner, I picked up my mail and found my official mail in Illinois voting ballot. I had ordered it online, available in my location. I rarely vote, but I completed the ballot and will mail it out tomorrow. I found the options and instructions to be user-friendly. Two polling questions which especially caught my attention were “If those with higher incomes should be taxed higher”, but also interesting to me was the question below on my ballot:

“Should the State of Illinois restrict the sale or possession of firearms that have been defined as assault weapons or of magazines that can hold more than a certain number of rounds of ammunition?”

In my other beliefs to try to mitigate mass shootings, I struggled with that question, despite my owning a few guns already. A beloved civilian relative of mine happened to be involved in a fire fight with a few armed perps who attacked him. He shared that for him, it made a difference that he had more rounds in his magazine, and believes that was why the shooters subsequently fled the scene.

I never thought I’d say this again, but from a humble person who was reluctant to vote; “Your voice can be heard my brothers and sisters, which-ever way you vote”.

Link to Chicago Board of Elections for mail order ballots option:

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Now, put that scenario on your foot. If you were limited in rounds, would those same criminals have fled?

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Arbitrary laws and ordinances like this make me shake my head.
Target lasers are illegal… makes me think the aldermen watch too much Star Wars.
I know it’s probably something about hitting your target, but they fail to understand that the alternative is missing my target. And if I must discharge a firearm in a crowded city, don’t you want me to hit my intended target, instead of the child at the end of the block?

I know I’m preaching to the choir, here, I just can’t figure it out. I love Chicago but their city council is such a hot mess. I could go on for pages about stupid things they’ve done since I’ve been old enough to pay attention.

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I miss Portillo’s :pleading_face:

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I am curious to know if I have a tlr6 on a glock can I cover the laser with tape and call it a disabled laser to make it legal to have the light portion of the attachment? I can write “this makes the laser legal in chicago” on the duct tape that covers the laser if it does.

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Good question Andrew. IDK. Perhaps others who are our neighbors or who reside in more restrictive environments like we do, can chime in, and help us. An old professor used to tell us, “err on the side of caution”. He meant, don’t risk or don’t take a chance – if you happen to live under such a law, too much on the line, too much to lose (legally).

Since one’s not supposed to have a laser in that region, maybe switch grips, or save up for a different model without a laser. If you go for better “sights”, IDK, but maybe ask a gun-smith to set them to your preferred yardage distance, as I had heard that some “sights” are great but not set/aligned on top of the firearm correctly. Stay safe, and stay legal. :slightly_smiling_face:

Sources:

Tape Will not adequately protect you from prosecution. However most of the time when this law is applied, it is a secondary matter. As in, Someone was carrying where they weren’t supposed to be or doing something you’re not supposed to do and on top of that there was a laser on the gun. Now if you had say a bodyguard 38 or 380 and removed the battery to be legal that would be a diffrent question.

[I’m not a lawyer, this is not legal advice]

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If you have a valid FOID card in Illinois you can legally own a switchblade knife in Illinois and that’s the only way you can legally have one😊

Yes but I think that Chicago has laws prohibiting having one specifically in cook county.

For what it’s worth, if someone wants to attack me with a knife, I hope it’s one of those scary switchblade or butterfly knives we see gangs use in the movies, and not a sturdy Ka-Bar or similar blade.

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