Best 9mm handgun for a woman to carry concealed

What’s the best 9mm handgun for a woman to carry concealed? My wife isn’t strong enough and can’t rack the slide on my S&W 9 shield and .380 ammo is pricey compared to 9mm.

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Ruger LCR 9mm.

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I would suggest going to a range where she can try some out. There are more options than people could mention. THe best gun for her will be one she is comfortable shooting and carrying and it’s as personal as clothing.

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Best practice would be: rent and test. CC firearm has to fit and be comfortably.

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This^^^^ for the win.

Add to it, find an “All Girl’s Gun Course”. Buy her a class, take her to a nice breakfast / lunch / dinner and drop her off and let her go.

IMHO the WORST instructor is your spouse or significant other, no matter how experienced, ESPECIALLY when getting her/him started.

She doesn’t understand your mindset on the range, she doesn’t understand your opinions, she doesn’t understand your experience (or lack there of). The list goes on. Let her make a decision that will be as personal to her as your firearm is to you. You already stepped in it by saying “9mm handgun for a woman”.

Cheers,

Craig6

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She knows what she is doing. We’ve gone to Front Sight and other training and we are at the range at least once a week. The only item of concern is that .380 ammo costs nearly 40% more.

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Ummmm so I’ll ask the obvious question. With all this training what did she shoot then? Again with that much training she should be able to get past the gun store “Now little lady, that’s a lot of gun…” counter cowboy.

Is this a present?

Not trying to offend but if the both of you have been to Front Sight and others she should have a pretty good grip (see what I did there :laughing:) on what she likes and can handle. I get that $$$ are an issue, believe me I understand that, I’m at a loss as to why she isn’t telling you what she wants.

Cheers,

Craig6

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No offense taken. She shoots well with her S&W .380 Shield and the slide pull is light enuf for to handle it well. We shoot often enuf that the ammo costs mount up so just looking. Just searching for a 9mm she can pull the slide on more easily. Female friend shoots a Glock 19. She has severe rheumatoid arthritis but she has a red dot sight that she can use as a handle to rack the slide but she doesn’t carry daily as we do.

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@Fred9, if the choice is yours, not her, just find whatever fits you, then let’s her try :slight_smile:

  • Walther PPS
  • Sig P365
  • Ruger LC9/EC9

I’ve tested PPS (rental) - very easy, smooth to rack the slide

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Find an event like the Shooters Roundup in Morristown, MN that we just went to. Pay $10 to get in hand a factory rep your drivers license, go to the ammo counter and buy ammo and shoot it. I did that on Saturday trying out every single 10mm pistol.

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@Fred9

Reloading is a viable option for range ammo for both of you. You can easily duplicate any SD ammo with ball at doggone near half the price. A pound of powder would last the both of you a good amount of time. If you are looking to spend $300 - 500 for a new bang stick you can get a whole bomb proof reloading set up and 1K of ammo for the same price. I’d be glad to walk you through it and you can decide from there.

Cheers,

Craig6

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Research ! Find a good shooting range that you can rent for the day a pistol of your choosing. Take a good feel and test how it fits your hand and manage recoil. The people
here, that have answered your questions are very right and very helpful.

Pick out what you want and can safely operate. You are the best.

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The best handgun for concealed carry-for a man or a woman-is the right one. What do I mean? A personal defense concealed handgun has to be RIGHT for YOU. It doesn’t matter what anyone else thinks of it.

First, you can eliminate any brands or models that are known to be of poor quality or function; don’t waste your time or risk your life.

Next, cross off any that don’t work with your carry style. Many full size handguns don’t conceal very well, depending of course on your particular size and shape, as well as your clothing styles. That being said, some carry positions can work with a larger/longer arms, such as shoulder holster. Appendix carry may require something smaller in order to be secure and comfortable while bending or sitting.

Now you can start handling various models. You need to find the right ergonomics, something that fits your hand and grip, that feels natural when you hold it. Look for one where your finger falls naturally on the trigger and allows a smooth press without the muzzle shifting.

Finally, test fire as many as you can. You’ll want the caliber/power level you can manage smoothly, quickly, and accurately. The finest weapon in the world isn’t suitable if you can’t hit what your aiming at or control the recoil.

Once you’ve made your choice, train! Make use of all the materials you find here, take classes if you can. Visit the range regularly to build the skills you need, then keep going to maintain them.

Keep this in mind from beginning to end: a concealed carry weapon is a very personal thing. It’s as intimate as your favorite underwear. It needs to fit just as well and feel just as comfortable all day long, so you don’t even notice it. And, if the time ever comes when its down to just you and it, it needs to bolster your confidence and help you get through that time successfully.

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One of the things I love about my membership at Shoot Point Blank is that I can rent as many guns (one at a time) as I like at no additional charge (other than buying ammo from them when i am renting - at least 1 box). I can shoot a magazine through one then swap it for another. When friends talk about wanting to try a certain gun, it gives me an opportunity and a reason to take them to the range to try some out. In some cases it has turned them off to what they thought they wanted and/or turned them on to another option. Either way it is always win-win!

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Thanks. Where is Shoot Point Blank? I’ll ask at our range. She can, and has, rented different guns. Would be interesting to see if we can try a number of different guns on the same visit.

Thanks

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If she can’t easily rack a slide, recoil on an LCR might be a concern.

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if that’s what works for her, buy her all the .380 ammo she can shoot in practice, and enough defensive rounds to keep her fully stocked. :smiley:

That 40% means nothing when compared to the gun she won’t practice with because she doesn’t like shooting it, the gun she won’t carry because she doesn’t trust it, and the gun she can’t rack in an emergency when her life depends on it.

Her ability to stay alive… or possibly keep you alive… depends on it.

Is your life worth that 40%? Is hers? :thinking:

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100% of all this ^^^

If she hasn’t tried it yet, lots of people (not just women) with hand strength issues love the M&P 380EZ - super easy to rack, very manageable recoil, not too tiny or too big to grip well.

A female instructor, BTW, may be able to teach her how to rack using the way women’s strength is best deployed, so that might not be a problem with her current gun after a lesson or two… and trust me there ARE things female instructors teach that are different from what a lot of male instructors teach. not saying “all”, but you’d be amazed at some of the things that some experienced male instructors should know for teaching women and don’t.

That sounds like a sideways track for getting yourself another gun :wink:

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If she can’t rack a slide consider a snub nose revolver. The make models with discrete hammers so they don’t catch while drawing.

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Maybe. My wife can’t rack the slide on a semiautomatic, she has fibromyalgia and RA. But, she can handle my .357 like a champ. It is a full-size beast, so @Fred9 would have to try one out. Ruger also makes the SP101 in 9mm. It weighs as much as a Glock 19, so the recoil should be extremely manageable.

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