Are you Prepared for a Disaster

Not to mention those rough Utah Winters when they first arrived. It’s no wonder they’ve put some thought into survival.

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The main issue I would have in the case of a disaster is related to medications.
I would last a few months and then be in trouble.
Also, survival is completely dependent on the community.
If everything goes sideways people would need to band together and pool/ration resources.
You’d need to re-evaluate your ethical guidelines and be prepared to do things that you would never have considered before the event.
Also, why are there no mention of firearms in the Mormon disaster document?
Ammo should be up there with food and water.
Did 2020 not teach us anything?

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Just a few quotes from the manual…

“One alternative is to plan on defending your home
with force. If you have enough gun-wise people in
the house, and enough fi rearms and ammo, you can
probably pull this off .”

“We’re all going to need as many law-abiding gun-toting
citizens as possible in order to fend off the criminals
and establish some degree of order.”

“No matter how you felt or thought about gun control in
the past, it’s time to face disaster-induced reality. The
gun-control politicians (and the people who supported
them) have placed Americans in a situation where not
only can the police not protect us in a timely manner, but
we cannot lawfully defend ourselves. Criminals unlawfully have fi rearms; citizens lawfully don’t. Intentionally or otherwise, gun-control supporters have created a
situation where an unfortunate number of innocent men,
women and children are going to be in danger during a
crisis simply because they could not obtain the tools of
self-defense.”

"A gun in your hand
is totally worthless against an assailant unless
you’re fully willing to use it to defend yourself.
You must understand that the new rules
brought on by a major disaster may require
you to defend your life personally. "

“The best weapon for home defense is a shotgun
with a short barrel.”

“The other useful weapon for home or personal
defense is a handgun. Although an automatic
shoots faster and loads quicker than a revolver, it
is a more complex mechanism and may jam occasionally, whereas a revolver almost never jams.”

“No matter which guns you get, be sure to get lots of
ammunition. Any ammo you don’t use or need could
be a great trade item after a disaster.”

".It is a terrible mistake to have
a gun and not know anything about proper shooting
and gun safety. If there is a gun course off ered in your
area, take it; ask about this at your local gun shop. "

“Finally, there is a cardinal rule about guns that should
always be kept in mind:
Never point a gun at someone unless you are
completely willing to shoot.
If your assailant senses hesitancy, he’ll move quickly
and take the gun away from you. Your life may depend upon this so it’s essential to accept it completely.
Go back and read the opening paragraphs above.
In a disaster the rules have changed; understand that and you will survive; fail to understand that and you will perish.”

"Guns are like tools, it’s difficult to have to many. The quanity and types of guns required will vary tremendously from
one person to another?

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Maybe the manual is worth a read through

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Any Crescent wrench will shut off your gas and many water meters too. I keep an eight inch crescent wrench secured down on the straps holding the water heater to the wall. You do have your water heater strapped down, don’t you? In earthquake country, if you do not, you are not going to be able to use the water stored in your water heater after it has fallen over and the water is all over your garage floor. Not a bad idea everywhere else that isn’t known to be earthquake country. I don’t know how badly a hurricane or tornado shakes a home. It might be enough to topple your water heater. Straps are cheap and easy to install. If I could install it, so can you.

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I keep a shut off wrench attached to my gas meter, all shutoffs are marked with a tag and instructions. :slightly_smiling_face:

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Here in earth quake country we plan for gas leaks, broken water mains, downed power lines. We had a 5.7 a year or so ago, luckily we didn’t see mass destruction.

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I am really tired of hearing how revolvers almost never jam. They do and it is usually catastrophic. Been there more than once and it usually takes tools to fix it. Revolvers have more parts than you realize and do not like being dirty. The 1911 replaced revolvers on the battlefield because they were more reliable and easier to maintain. I have center fire semi autos that have never jammed. A Keltec P11 had one failure to fire in over 6000 rounds due to a bad primer. I also had an officers model 1911 destroyed by a bad factory round. Stuff happens. That is why police carry backup guns. Magazines are the main weak point on semi autos. Carry a spare and use good ammo.

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Am I prepared for a disaster? No one is ever fully prepared. Something will go wrong. It is your ability to overcome obstacles that will make the difference on whether or not you survive. Yes I have all the usual stuff and maybe a bit more. How many have an alternate means of transportation like a bike. You can hang a lot of gear on a bike. Add a trailer and you can haul more. Several people in our neighborhood have antique cars with no electronics.
I have considered picking up a travel trailer. Not to tow but a life boat. A lot easier to live in than a house with no power. I have boondocked in RVs for months during the summer so I do have experience. I have also wintered in snow. You can do a lot with a generator and solar in a small area and it does not get that cold where I live in Arizona.

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It does get cold in my little corner of AZ but we have a wood stove for heat and a forest full of fuel.

I would eventually like to get a small camping trailer for vacations and a mobile bug out relocation shelter. Right now I have to settle for my old mountain bike with my son’s old kid carrier wagon hooked on the back. He has his bike now and that wagon can hold enough camping gear for the 3 of us.

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EMP-resistant tech

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If you are knowledgeable please start a thread.

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I wish I were.

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Catalogued in my Department of Redundancy Department, I have kept my dad’s old Coleman white gas stove and lantern.
I also have a stove and lanterns that burn kerosene.
Plus a milsurp Yukon stove that burns wood, and plenty of flashlights.

I also keep forestry tools for clearing down trees so emergency vehicles can access my street,
A chain saw, plus a one man crosscut, plus axes. The Department of Redundancy demands it.

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That describes my typical camping kit, along with a 4 man and 10 man canvas (The real stuff) tents.

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You forget one of Chernobyl’s major design flaws, no containment building like ones built in the US. The US specs call for them to be impact resistant to a passenger jet striking them (747 if I recall.) The containment building is also supposed to be resistant to an internal explosion (non nuclear - reactors are designed to melt down, not blow up.) Of course after engineering there are issues with the build and contracting and building the NPP. You are or were in that field so perhaps you may comment on the containment buildings (or perhaps not.)

I have heard that if you are worried about Iodine 131 exposure, dunking one of your digits up to the first knuckle in Iodine will load up your thyroid to prevent absorbing Iodine 131 from the environment for those concerned. Also worthwhile noting the antiseptic properties of Iodine can serve double duty for preppers.

I did have one rather concerning thing happen to me recently, lost water for 10 hours. Drinking water is very prevalent, however I learned it takes about two gallons of water to flush a toilet. If without water for a longer period have buckets ready, know where a lake or pool is, and adapt. Not having water for flushing made me wish I had a pool. So, moral of the story, having food and potable water is important, but water for basic sanitation is a consideration in any major event. Having no water for 10 hours was worse than not having electricity for a day or two.

Lastly, warmth. More people die of cold than heat. I have lost heat due to frozen gas lines and no electricity in the past. Having a gas fireplace may or may not work. Having wood and a wood burning fireplace is important.

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…and they violated every line of safety protocol, and turned off 3 levels of disaster prevention systems, and conducted the experiment without notifying the plant’s chief scientist. Very likely, it was an act of sabotage.

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All things that could happen anywhere to anyone, I would opine…human error and/or sabotage are always possible. Just sayin’

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I did not forget that Chernobyl had no containment. Neither did early USA reactors. 1940’s technology. Containment structures had massive amounts of steel, plumbing and electrical systems in them. It was a massive heat sink. The government models were based on an empty building. Major blunder. I have not worked on a nuke in 40 years. Technology changes and I would expect the newer reactors to be even safer. I would have liked to have the paper supply contract. Everything down to the minutest detail had a paper trail. There are new mini reactors that run on spent fuel from the big reactors. I have worked maintenance on an older working reactor and it is not fun. Hazards are real.
I never heard about dunking a finger in Iodine.
I heard of a guy that complained he could not flush his toilet during a heavy rainstorm and flooding. He was told to get a bucket of water from outside. Duh. I recently installed new low flush toilets. 2 flush mechanisms. 1 light 1.1 gallons and 1 heavy 1.6 gallons. We have a swimming pool. Problem is the sewer goes to a lift station down the street. No power and it will fill up. I have 5 gallon buckets. You can use cat litter, sawdust, cedar chips or even mulch. Gets full, seal it and leave it outside for several weeks. It will be useable for a garden. If you have a farm supply like Tractor Supply you can get liter or cedar chips in their pet department. They also carry food grade 5 gallon buckets for food storage.

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A follow up on gardens. Urine can be used as a fertilizer. It is high in nitrogen and phosphorus. It has been used for millennia. Composted human waste has also been used as fertilizer. You do what you have to do. The composting toilets are similar to the 5 gallon buckets you will need if we lose power and water.
Mother Earth News is still relevant.
You Can Compost Human Waste! – Mother Earth News(feces%2C%20toilet%20paper%20and,flower%20beds%2C%E2%80%9D%20Keaney%20says.

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