Are you Prepared for a Disaster

That is where i got my supply from,and that is where I spend about 2k a month stocking all kinds of supplies since 2020, i use the what if scenario!

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In Highlands,Texas where I was born and raised we had a road leading we called under the hill,we had a sewer plant there and tthe concrete open top tanks that human waste would be pumped in and was open air dried out and trucks would get the dried human waste and deliver it to the surounding farms as fertilizer

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Thanks for the tip, I am deep in the 'burbs. Have a feeling though if the worst was to happen bugging out would be the best long term strategy.

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I’m a big believer in that. Large metropolitan areas are the worst place to be if society breaks down. There are simply too many predators and not enough food for all of them. Cities are modern marvels, but are completely unsustainable without massive and constant resource pushes.

In this theoretical collapse, though I do think there is an ideal size town or village, where people can help one another instead of eating each other. I don’t know what that size it, and it probably varies depending on location. But people are more likely to survive and thrive when they work together, and this would be the key to rebuilding society.

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BTW, for those of you that may have traditional geiger counters. You should know there are huge differences in the amounts of radiation that can be measured and counted. A standard Civil Defense CDV-700 can oversaturate and read 0 cpm in a strong radiation field. Learn the difference in CPM or CPS, and Measuring in Micro Roentgen per Hour, Milli Roentgen per hour and Roentgen per Hour and know the difference in REM versus Roentgen. Know what Sievert means or Gray. This is of course if you are concerned with a radiological hazard. Don’t rely on movies, the old Civil Defense manuals are better than the crud you will find on some websites. A word about equipment as well. The old Civil Defense CDV-700’s are pretty good, great for a hobbyist and better than nothing for survival, but the old CDV 715, 717’s and 720’s most likely will not work. EcoTest makes some pretty good radiological detection equipment, as well as Polimaster, Thermo and Ludlum, but it gets pricey very quickly. Remember, you get what you pay for.

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For us it’s the opposite, we live in a food belt, literally. A small (10.000 people) close knit community with a lot of farmers markets and roadside stands, large fruit orchards, dairy and beef cattle, goats and sheep. We grew some of our own food this year and will expand next year. We also have a large Amish community that grow food for themselves and for sale, if we run out of gas we can always hitch a ride from the Amish. :rofl:

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The problem with bugging out if you have not already established yourself in a bug out locations is that you and however many other people consider bugging out will be strangers in a strange land. Do not feel you will be welcome. Small towns are famously and notoriously close knit. That means they support each other and look with suspicion on strangers, especially when the strangers show up with nothing in their hands and want the natives to share what they have. Do not be surprised if you find road blocks on small towns with no entrance allowed. Don’t be surprised if warned that if seen again, you will be shot.

If you are looking for a place to bug out to, research it first and learn what the local problems are, Visit it on day visits and if accommodations are available, stay over for a week or two at different times. Establish a cache in that town so that when you and your family show up on shank’s mare with just the clothes on your backs you will have supplies available to you and won’t have to rely on the possible kindness of strangers. If it is a situation of sufficient magnitude that you feel you have to leave your home, and it is nationwide, you can depend on people hoarding what supplies they have on hand and will be willing only to barter as opposed to give. If you have nothing to barter, what will you be willing to do in order to live?

Put yourself in the place of the typical homeowner in a 10,000 people small farming community. Would you welcome refugees from the big city 100 miles away who show up dirty, unkept, penniless, and starving on your doorstep with open arms? Or would you be suspicious, distrusting, unwelcoming and refuse to gift them food and other supplies because they didn’t prepare for the emergency?

I have been reading about, studying and thinking about end of the world events such as a massive CME since I first learned about the Carrington event more than ten years ago. Had I the uninterrupted time, I well could write a book about survival. There are several books out that I have read and I will recommend one. Steven Konkoly’s book on survival written with another author whose name I do not recall at the moment. It is a common sense approach to survival that other writers seem to lack such as the author who is an “expert” on planning survival who asserts that one can cover 150 miles in three days pushing a grocery cart. That is so ludicrous as to almost not be worthy of a response. I don’t care what you did when you were 20 and in good physical condition and urged on by a dedicated sergeant, if you are now 40 and the most exercise you get is ripping open the 12-pack packaging, you are NOT going to cover 50 miles for three consecutive days. 21 years ago, I had trained for a vigorous hike that turned out to be just a tad more vigorous than I anticipated. We averaged 50 km a day which is 30 miles a day for a week. I won’t go into all the details, but it was grueling and only able to be accomplished because of detailed planning and organization by the sponsoring group. Pushing a loaded grocery cart??? No effing way, even over paved, unblemished surfaces. Nuff said. Survival is not the topic of this list, so I will quit here.

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