Actress accidentally killed in her sleep

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“…cleaning his gun when it accidentally discharged”
NO, It did not accidently discharge, the firearm was loaded on purpose. He knew or should have known there was a round in the chamber and that the firearm was ready to fire. If he didn’t he had no right to be handling the gun, “he had forgotten it was loaded”? Doesn’t matter if he “forgot” or not, he didn’t check, he didn’t manage the muzzle, he didn’t handle the firearm safely.

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I always have a huge issue with that excuse. Even dry-fire, with the rounds not even the same room, one should still be practicing safe handling. Clearly the trigger was pulled/pressed while the firearm was pointed in an unsafe direction - that is not an accident, that is negligence. I know many Glocks and some others require a trigger press before disassembly, but not practicing safe handling is just plain stupid, not accidental.

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Cases like this, it’s like DUI. When the driver crashes, it’s not an accident.

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Not an accident, but negligence.

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First step in every firearm owner’s manual ever written regarding “Cleaning your firearm”. “MAKE SURE YOUR FIREARM IS UNLOADED…”

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This just makes my blood boil. Can’t handle a gun? Then don’t mess with it.

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My condolences to her family. Another sad story of one life taken because of someone not thinking.

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I don’t get how people can be so irresponsible.
When you have a gun in your hand, every move should be thought through and deliberate.

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Years ago I learned the lesson of ensuring a gun is no longer loaded. I was living in Panama and heard a helluva racket on my rear deck. I grabbed a cheap .25 caliber auto cuz it was easily accessible, racked one into the chamber and headed downstairs. The racket was a monkey going absolutely hambone on my storage room door to get at a bunch of bananas I had cut from my banana tree and hung earlier in the day. I chased him off and headed to the bathroom (you know, since I’m up may as well go, but I digress). After I finished I dropped the mag and racked it. Not surprised that I didn’t hear a bullet hit the floor as the bathroom was carpeted. No hammer so I pointed it away from me and pulled the trigger and BANG! You don’t know how loud a little .25 is in an 8X10 bathroom until you do it. Scared the bejesus out of me. Ever since then, I lock back the rack and also check with my eyes. A little expensive a lesson as I learned what a .25 can do to a porcelain sink.

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As a former Special Agent with a major Federal Law Enforcement agency, we are required to qualify at a supervised range in the presence of a firearms training officer. At the end of our qualification we must clean and reload our weapons. After a training session, while tending to my weapon, the agent next to me started cleaning his weapon (a revolver) and, for whatever reason, pointed the weapon at the floor and pulled the trigger. This was followed by an deafening blast as the gun discharged. The agent had several years experience and was quite familiar with firearms. There is no excuse for a potentially lethal mistake as this. he was suspended for a week and had to go through a retraining course in safety. The agent 1. should have properly cleared his weapon, 2. checked to see if it was loaded (he may have missed a chamber while he was clearing it, and 3. never have pulled the trigger outside of the firing range. Another incident occurred when agent was showing me a new weapon he had purchased. I asked if I hold the weapon and, upon agreeing, he cleared the round from the chamber (automatic pistol), dropped the magazine, aimed at a clock on the wall, pulled the trigger, and shot the clock off the wall. He forgot the order of clearing a semi automatic weapon is to drop the magazine then clear the chamber. Otherwise there is still a round in the chamber. My point is that we all make mistakes, even the most well trained can screw the pooch. Like driving a car, hitting a golf ball, or flying a plane, familiarizing yourself with the weapon and how to handle it is the most important part of owning a gun. A fatal mistake is not the proper way of learning to use a gun.

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I’ve been around a few negligent discharge events, both as a civilian and military, without any injuries. Once overseas I stopped at the MP hut to see a buddy and two MP’s came in off watch and starting to do their quick draw routine. My buddy said they do it often and when I said are you guys nuts, they decided to show the stranger their 1911’s were empty. They aimed at a bunk and pulled the triggers. One went click and the other put a round through the mattress and into a foot locker. They managed to cover up the incident but it was a real come-to-Jesus event for the MP company.
As a civilian after a group of us finished bird hunting we had unloaded and cased our shotguns. One guy was still messing with his gun and pointing the muzzle towards where the dogs were. When someone told him to be careful where he pointed the gun he said it was empty. He pointed at a dirt mound and pulled the trigger. After the gun discharged all you heard were apologies and he was visibly shaken. I never saw him hunting again.
I guess you could say some form of muzzle discipline prevented any serious injury. However, these were experienced gun owners that had taken a cavalier attitude toward gun handling. Maybe we can borrow from the old saying of measure twice and cut once. Check what you are doing more than once, it won’t make you less proficient and it might make you safer. When I get static for being careful I just say I hate the consequences of making a mistake that can be avoided. As @keith129 said you need to get familiar with your firearm.

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First thing I was taught. Treat all guns as they are loaded. I have always done this. One of my best memories of CCW course that I had to take to get my permit. Our instructors anytime a handgun was going to change hands is that it be cleared and handed to the recieving person barrel down, Slide locked and Magazine well so that the person could see through it. Even though I always cleared my carry before this. I adopted this way after that. Always safety first.

                                                                                              Have a great day
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My son thought I was crazy when I was teaching him, I’d take the gun, drop the mag, rack it 3 times, look into the chamber, feel the chamber and with the slide locked back I’d hand it to him muzzle down and away THEN I’d tell him “now that you are responsible for that firearm you check it just like I did”. Of course, at first, he’d say “but I just watched you clear the chamber why should I do it ALL again?” My response, “I checked it for ME now you need to check it for YOU”.

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Yep, He might have thought you were crazy. But I think you were crazy like a fox.

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I used to see the red cans with sand outside the Provost. Always wondered how many .45 and .38 slugs were in them.

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I’ve never understood why someone would pull the trigger as a way to ensure a firearm is clear. Can’t you just pull it back and look?

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Cringeworthy :woozy_face:

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The unbelievable moron in the gun shop represents a lot of clueless people. He’s facing some serious consequences and better hope his friend survives.

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Supposed to visually and physically inspect the chamber. At no time did he did that. Shame.

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