A Spring And Summer Beach Advisory

I’ve never cared for beachgoing, beyond sitting and relaxing at a nice bar or restaurant, and enjoying the weather - if you’ve been to one, you’ve been to 'em all. When standing on a shoreline, do any of you ever realize that you’re on the edge of another type of JUNGLE - underwater for sure, but full of more dangerous and venomous creatures than any other jungle? Jellyfish, stingrays, cone shells, sea snakes, stonefish, and scorpions - believe it or not - are annual residents that undergo population surges at this time of year. The last thing you should wear at the beach is anything that exposes your feet - even a pair of cheapo sneakers that protect your heels and ankles is better than nothing. And when you walk in the water, slide your feet, just as you would going over ice. And by the way, if you collect shells, be very attentive to whether they’re occupied or not, especially cone shells. They’re very pretty, and there’s 600 species of them, but their residents are extremely venomous - at least two deaths have been attributed to them from careless handling.

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Imo, as a surfnut…every beach is different, and during the course of a day, the beach itself changes dramatically.
Only advisory I’d add is skin protection is a must. My dad had some pretty bad skin cancer and I’m in the early stages.
Sailed, fished, swam, snoreled, surfed and skiied salt water from 13-55, no major issue except from the sun.
If you’re fearful, carry a speargun :wink:
Agree with your precautions though. I was happiest once my feet were off the bottom, and always monitor the jellies. We started getting Man of war in long island sound, and more jellyfish in Long Island, Fishers Island and Block Island Sounds, so I started heading to Montauk more often in my saliboat for surfing…all they’re known for is sharks :laughing:

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One of the biggest hazards we have in our mountain lakes and streams is Glass, idiots that throw bottles into the water and think that once they sink they are gone. I’ve been sewed up more than once from stepping on broken glass.

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Wow! For a moment I thought you were speaking of LA, San Francisco, Chicago and NY! I feel much safer in chummed, shark infested waters, than in any blue state! At least, I have a physical fighting chance against the shark!

That sign should be amended to BE STATE SMART!
Don’t be fooled, that is a photo of blue state mayors!

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That “staying on path” in the dunes is important. Freaking ticks galore in sand dunes. I used to run while high stepping going through them, seen them come out of the dunes to the nearest beach towel like nails to a magnet.

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On Saturdays, BEACH PATROL is shown - and sure enough, there’s at least one incident of someone being stung by something. The usual treatment is vinegar rubbed or sprayed on the sting site, to neutralize the neurotoxins and relieve the sharp pain produced until an ambulance arrives. One swimmer was stung under his arm, and the pain was making him seize up, clenching his fists. He ignored the purple warning flag announcing dangerous marine creatures in the water, and got tagged by a Portuguese man o’ war. Depending on the size of the pneumatophore or bladder, the tentacles on these can reach 75’ - since these are frequently washed ashore and beached, they’re an additional danger to beachcombers and bathers, kids and dogs running around.

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If you’re headed for Florida or the Caribbean, learn all you can about barracuda, too. They hunt mainly with their keen eyesight, and are attracted by shiny objects. Wearing jewelry when you swim is an invitation to lose an appendage, or a chunk of your anatomy in a split second. Unlike a shark, barracuda bites are surgical in nature - one scuba diver who lost part of his shoulder said that he felt the strike, but realized he’d been bitten only after he saw his blood in the water. Barracuda encounters are hit-and-run incidents most of the time.

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Urine is a good expedient if you don’t have one of the many commercial applications for jellies stings.

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What do ya think of my two advisories? I thought it was a good time to post them, and I hope they’re taken seriously - how’s THAT for situational awareness?

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Those cities make up parts of the CONCRETE jungle.

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My buddy “Mark the shark” gave up salt water after yet another weekend off Montauk. He and his brother had a 25’ Hydra-Sport kevlar hulled fishing boat, every weekend in season going for shark and tuna. One Saturday, got a thresher and a mako hanging by the tail off the side, they see a wake coming at their boat. Not in the sub path to the Thames, turns out it’s a White big as their boat. Mark tells his brother to cut their catch loose, his brother turns toward their catch, and 2 Whites are inhaling the mako and thresher. Brother defecated, Mark grabbed an axe and cut the lines, flooded one motor in a panic, ran back to Noank, told the marina boss to haul it and sell it. Back to bass…calico bass :sweat_smile:
Yeah, as far as the tournaments go, I used to sail over from New London to Lake Montauk, anchor out and walk across the road to surf…and see the sport fishermen coming in. It’s when they start trolling off the beach is when I’d start to doubt my sanity…but it’s like bear. Don’t be the furthest out, don’t be the clumsiest “lure”.

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I know for a fact that there are also big sharks in Long Island sound by the size of the bite marks on very large Striped bass. I got hooked on skin diving in Barbados and key west big time. Tried it in the Sound and about 3 feet of visibility, couldn’t see the bottom until you could touch it and I’m not into wet suits. I’m done, stick a fork in me.
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Had a wounded bluefish bouncing off the bottom under me one day snorkeling Watch Hill Passage. Freaked me out, 15 pounds of writhing shiny bait… I’m looking for my kid, he’s heading further out…and yeah, clearer than the Sound, but you don’t see anything until you DO. I could see my kid 30’ away, but nothing else,with that damn blue sending SOS signals…
I used to snorkel at Block Island, Crescent Beach. It was real nice, spaced rock and sand,pretty clear and good fish life. Then a hurricane messed it all up.
My buddy Mark estimated the Whites that ate his sharks and bit his gunwale at 23-25’. His boat was 25, so direct comparison, and definitely not a guy to exaggerate. Half the shop had shark jaws from this guy.

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I’ve spearfished and Florida lobstered (big crayfish) from Daytona down to Sebastian for the last 30+ years. Most times the visibility is 100’+ in the first 30’ down. It usually drops to 5’ to 15’ visibility past 30’ deep. Most of my diving was 80’ to 135’, so definitely in the low vis arena.

One day I was doing a safety stop at about 20’ deep in the 100’+ vis area. My buddy’s 28’ boat hull was in clear view about 20’ off to one side of me. The biggest shark I ever saw in my life came swimming right under the boat – this shark dwarfed a 28’ boat! No worries though, it was a harmless (to me) whale shark. Definitely one of those never will forget experiences. :+1:

The Doctors are not encouraging of me to ever dive again since my 6-bypass surgery last year, but I feel fortunate to have experienced a lot of memorable outings. My last, and might literally be last, dive was around 80’ to 100’. I had a pretty nice stringer going, checked the gas in the tank, and it was time head for the surface. I saw one more nice fish to shoot, so took the shot and started heading up with the last fish on the spearshaft, i.e., empty speargun. As soon as I started toward the surface a 6 to 7 foot Sandbar shark started circling me. Sandbars are in the Bull shark family, but are usually not very aggressive towards divers. This one didn’t get the memo. I bludgeoned the heck out of it several times with the muzzle of the unloaded speargun. It circled me all the way to the boat. Once I was safely in the boat it swam a couple of laps around us, ala Jaws style, with the dorsal out of the water :slight_smile:

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WHY was this animal killed? Did you EAT it? My guess is because it was BIG, it was a SHARK, it was EVIL, and you COULD. This ranks right DOWN there with trophy-hunting - KEERIST!

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That was a catch and release.
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@KURT17 >>> Come Bock, Come Bock, Ok now that its safer in the water, stay out of the car and get in the water. I bet your ass
you couldn’t get eaten by a shark if you wanted to. Don’t worry be happy.

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@KURT17 >>> It’s a darn good Topic and, there are countless bad things that can happen in or on the water. I use to feel safer on a power pole than on the ground because I was Careful, a few coworkers not so much.
Point is “ it is important to be Careful in And on the water, but more so on land “ ( disclaimer regarding sea pirates ).

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Back to @KURT17 original topic, I unfortunately can relate to jellyfish and Lionfish encounters being pretty painful. :-1:

Regarding eating sharks, I do occasionally keep a Black Tip caught on rod and reel. They are very plentiful and I think they taste good. I also like Lemon shark, but they don’t seem to be as plentiful, so have not kept one for many years.

I will also keep and eat Barracuda (aka Spotted Wahoo) up to about 3’ as I consider them as good or better than some species of grouper. Past the 3’ size the meat seems to change to about the quality of mackerel, so I release the big ones. BTW, those choppers in the front are nothing compared to the set in the back :smiley:

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