22 caliber ammo concerns

When my Dad passed, my mother gave me his old 60’s model German 22 revolver. It is chrome with pearl colored white handles, and a leather holster - and an older box of ammo - pre barcodes on the box.
Loaded it up and it was bang click, click, bang etc. I suspect it was the gun’s age but I also loaded up my Henry AR-7 survival rifle and experienced at least 3 no fires in each 8 round magazine. And then I would reload the dud rounds and they would fire.
That was over 10 yrs ago, I figured I’d just put it in the drawer since having other pistols, didn’t pursue figuring out how to identify whether it was gun or ammo issues, now I’m going to buy a new box of ammo and see if that could be the solution. It would be nice to have a useful revolver around for other members of my family to use if need be.
Is there inherent issues with rim fire 22 caliber pistols & revolvers? There seems to be a bunch of new ones coming to market now, I like the new Kel-tec 17 round pistol but in the back of my mind I recall those failure to fire episodes. Whatcha think about rimfire handguns? Is there a Premium 22 caliber Brand?
Thanks in advance, Bruno

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Hi @Bruno - I would highly suggest having the gun inspected by a gunsmith to ensure nothing is wrong with the gun. I’d also give the old ammo to a range or gunsmith who disposes of old ammo.

There are a number of great .22 handguns out there. M&P, Glock, and Ruger all have .22 pistols - I’m sure others do as well those are just the brands I’ve shot personally.

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I know glock is a really well trusted brand. I have a glock 45 and it hasn’t let me down yet. So a .22LR from glock I’d only assume would be amazing

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Misfires are more common than one really wants to admit. You did not specify what the old ammo was, but I would not immediately blame the gun, especially since it happened with the same ammo in two different guns. The fact that it went bang the second time you hit it also suggests its the ammo. Of course, having the gun checked out by a gunsmith is always a good idea. But the standard (and yes, I am sure people will argue with me on this) is the CCI mini-mag. Get a box or two of mini-mags and see if the problem persists you can decide if you want to investigate further.

As for .22’s, Glock is actually relatively new to the .22 world, releasing their .22 firearm within the last 6 months to a year. I have a S&W M&P .22C and it is great, but the Ruger MK IV is more accurate. Also, if you are into customizing, you will want to go with the Ruger. They can be tricked out like the 10/22 through companies such as tandemkross and volquartzen just to start the list of companies making aftermarket products from triggers to barrels.

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@Brian139 , I agree that the ammo is most likely at fault since duds fired in the Henry.
The priming compound in rimfire ammo is in the lip of the case and, if cheaper ammo, may not have had enough added at manufacture or, it could be that due to age, compound is less volatile and the Henry had a harder firing pin hit.

@Bruno try some fresh ammo, it doesn’t need to be premium. If the pistol doesn’t reliably ignite it, have a 'smith look at it. The firing pin may be worn, the pin may have caused a dent at the rear of the barrel from dry-fires over the years, firing pin spring may be weak, or, it could simply be gummed-up oil restricting pin movement.

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@Bruno OOPS! I just reread the OP and noticed ‘revolver’. Scratch the gummed-up oil and barrel dent ideas.
Worn pin or weak spring is still a likely culprit. Also, check the cylinder for any play back to front and then try to wiggle it left to right to check for a worn yoke.

I’m really suspecting the ammo age in this instance. No telling how it was stored.

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some brands are more common to have dud rounds from personal experience I have quit buying Winchester rounds for my 22 mag as approx 1-5% have been duds

Also some firearms are finicky about ammo so after having it checked out (NEVER ignore Dawn) I would try different brands to see if that makes a difference

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No worries. Modern rimfires with modern ammo should perform very well.
Never dry fire a .22lr!

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Hello

Save and preserve the old Ammo the best you can, if you have the original box all the better. There are collectors of old ammo or it can even be put in with a display case of the firearm. Family heirloom firearms are wonderful.

On a modern 22 there have been a lot of good suggestions. My top 4, in no particular order.

Glock 44
Taurus tx 22
Ruger 22/45 gen IV
MnP 22 compact.

Have fun and stay safe

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Your old “German” revolver may be anything from an RG (junk) to a Korth (ultra high end). You need to clarify exactly what you are dealing with. A good quality older revolver mat simply have a weak spring. If it’s a decently made weapon there’s no reason it won’t work weak for years to come if it’s maintained. A gunsmith can easily check out your old revolver. As for the ammo, it very well may be the entire issue. Cheap rim fire ammo can cause issues, and if it’s really ond, I’d just stick it in the box and put it up or sell to a collector

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German 22? What brand is it? if its a RG then wait for the next gun buy back and get rid of that bomb.

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I’ll have to get it out and look, I know it says Made In Germany, is more than a six shot and it was my Dad’s pistol, he actually passed away 17 yrs ago today. I’m going to keep it & not load it. I’ve learned a bunch about 22’s since posting the original post, the combined knowledge of this group is phenomenal and I’m grateful to EACH of the people who reacted & shared insight. Thanks, Bruno :peace_symbol::purple_heart::pray::sunglasses:

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Since its a hand me down then keep it in memory of your dad. But i wouldnt fire it if its a RG.

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