Workplace bans weapons from my own vehicle in the parking lot and beyond?

"The Company specifically prohibits the possession of weapons by any employee while on company property or while performing Company business off premises. This ban includes keeping or transporting a weapon in a vehicle or in a parking area.

The provisions of this policy apply to all property owned, operated or serviced by the Company or where Company employees perform work and to all Company employees, contract and temporary workers, and anyone else on Company property. It also applies to any Company employee off company property, whether or not engaged in performing business or duties on behalf of the Company."

Would I be breaking the Company policy or also breaking the law in CT? Since in CT you are supposed to obey owner bans.

The way this is worded. It sounds like I’m banned from even owning a gun, in order to work for them.

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I think (ask a lawyer) that it is just poorly worded to mean you can’t posses a gun on company property, or on a client’s property when on or off the “clock”.

I don’t think (again, ask a lawyer) they can prevent you from owning a gun on your own time, off company and client property.

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Did you hear that? That’s the sound of me clocking out.
What I do next is none of their business.

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You’re right. It must mean while still on the clock.

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No union. I’m sure they just left out the part where I’m still on the clock. But still, a gun locked in a safe in my own car?

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What if I’m working from home?

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@Salvatore7 Welcome to the community! We are glad to have you!

CT state laws doesn’t address firearms in the workplace. You may want to contact a lawyer or state department of labor.

Best wishes!

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I understand. That’s what USCCA said when I called. But, they also suggested that I post it here in case a lawyer responds. Thanks!

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Who would have thought that Minnesota law says I can. That one for us, the only one.

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Sounds to me that they’re saying you can’t posses a weapon if you work for you the company. It also sounds to me to be unconstitutional. I mean, what if a big company, say Twitter, said you can’t express your 1st amendment right to free speech on or off company time? Oh wait.

I’m very interested in what a lawyer would have to say about this.

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I would have to report that to the police.

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Your company is engaged in CYA, and can set whatever employee rules management wants to avoid serious lawsuits - they can’t control your personal life, but certainly your working life, as long as you’re an active employee (wages, hours, conditions). Incidents of workplace violence have resulted in many companies tightening these rules. FYI

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@Salvatore7
I would definitely speak with an attorney because that seems to be unconstitutional.
Curious to hear the USCCA response. I’m sure someone will get back to you.

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I’m fully aware but also believe that how this is worded isn’t legal. Anyway, I just realized that I may not be able to keep one in my car once they have me traveling to Massachusetts. It’s not worth the hassle at this point. But, since this appears to go beyond that, it would be nice to know for future reference. For example, visitors or patients won’t know until they get to the door, and would be allowed to lock their weapon in their vehicle. So I’m guessing just from that, it would be legal, just if they found out that I did then I could possibly lose my job due to policy. Some policies are null due to legality though. I don’t think I’ll bother calling labor lawyers unless my job is threatened. Lawyers would probably argue this point if needed, and there may be no precedent to give a firm answer. I probably just answered my own question now. lol

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Indeed. I appreciate everyone’s input on this here. I feel like it could be interpreted differently depending on viewpoints.

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  1. The company cannot search your person or your car. They may ask to - and you should refuse. Always.

  2. Do they own the parking lot, or is it public and leased? If the latter, they have no say over what happens in the parking lot.

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@Blacky, Delta Defense is the service provider for the USCCA. We are not attorneys and do not give legal advice. We can show you where the laws are and what the laws say, but we cannot interpret what the laws mean in different areas as each location will intepret laws differently based on numerous factors.

We do work with attorneys across the country who specialize in self-defense law in their locations.

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Maybe start a bill tailored after us here in Florida…

Florida’s “Bring Your Guns To Work Law” | Florida Employment Lawyers (floridalaborlawyer.com)

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That line is the one that gets me. I’m not sure if a company can tell their employees what they can or can’t do in their off time (granted, companies that do random drug tests are in a way doing that already). :thinking:

A couple of points in CT law that may affect you, CT is an at-will employment state (meaning they can fire you without any specific reason without warning) and they can prohibit you from carrying on the job. Here are two references for you.

CT is an at-will employment state:
https://www.cga.ct.gov/searchresults.asp?cx=005177121039084408563%3Ahs1zq3ague8&ie=UTF-8&cof=FORID%3A10&q=at+will&submission=

And they can prohibit you from carrying on the job in CT:
https://www.cga.ct.gov/2005/rpt/2005-R-0489.htm

Is there an option to change jobs? That might be your best bet when it comes to your self-defense options, @Salvatore7.

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That clause about working for national defense forced me to drive 1-1/2 to 2 hours back and forth to work unarmed in Orlando until I retired. Unfortunately life is filled with tradeoffs.

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