Waukesha South High School on Lockdown

Gunshots in another high school’s hallways this morning… and this one hits very close to home for me. I live within 15 miles of this high school and my sons have both wrestled in that high school’s gymnasium.

It sounds like an isolated incident, thankfully only one person was injured.

Have you been affected by or close to a school shooting? How do you deal with the aftermath?

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Gunshots were exchanged between a student and a school resource officer inside Waukesha South High School in Wisconsin, according to school officials.

From USA Today

My nephew has been threatened as a target of a school shooting. It was pathetic how the school and law enforcement handled it. So I referred the family to the book Gift of Fear. I told them to take the book seriously and never feel bad if you’re wrong or overreact.

I also called him and told him some red flags if the kid had a gun. Basically told him to look for major attitude changes. If he’s unusually quite and disconnected, if he’s paranoid about keeping his bag very close to him. If he’s walking and moving unnaturally or favoring a side. And if he sees any of this and feels that fear don’t ask permission just quietly leave. Not to the principal office leave school call your parents and meet up in town. Where his school is located it is in a very safe and populated area and his parents are only 20 mins away.

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I’m so glad you were able to give him some pointers, @Sheepdog556! I’ll have to check out Gift of Fear. Here’s a link to the book on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Gift-Fear-Survival-Signals-Violence/dp/0440226198/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=gift+of+fear&qid=1575315708&sr=8-1

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I downloaded the audio book. It was super easy to listen too. Sounded like a Lt. Col Grossman lecture. Very easy to listen too. I also bought the book because I enjoy being able to reference things

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It sounds like the police officer handled the situation very well:

…the school resource officer “immediately responded” to the classroom and tried to secure the classroom by getting other students to safety.

Officers from the police department and sheriff’s office responded to the scene, and tried talking to the 17-year-old male student to “deescalate” the situation, Jack said.

The school resource officer, an 11-year-veteran of Waukesha police, “was forced to discharge” his firearm, he said. The officers immediately administered life-saving attention and evacuated students from the classroom before placing the school on lockdown.

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I am very sorry your nephew has to go through which no kid is expected to go through. Hopefully, this experience doesnt leave any scars.
You are doing the right thing by teaching him to trust his intuition and his eyes over school officials’ and police. Heaven forbid anything happens they will hide behind “no constitutional right to be protected by police”.
It is beyond me what reason exists not to throw the kid responsible for threats out.

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He’s a tough kid. He’s already been through stuff that would break most grown men. I’m excited to see what he’s gonna do.

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You never want to see it end with loss of life, but if there’s going to be loss of life I’m glad they limited the risk to innocent people.

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News is now saying a Waukesha LEO and not the resource officer fired his weapon.

Should we be surprised when children fear no higher authority because they choose to act like the animals they are taught they came from?

Here is something I pulled off FB that is worth the read. Jonathan Krause seems to be the original poster.

Jonathan Krause

I’ve been trying to keep it light on this site but I have to share some of my experiences from today around Oshkosh West High School.

First, our Lieutenant Governor and our local State Representative were quick to post on social media that Republicans were responsible for both of the incidents at Oshkosh West and at Waukesha South this week because they “refuse to do something” on gun control bills. I found the timing and the claims ludicrous, as those of us covering the story already knew and were reporting that the assailant at Oshkosh West was armed with a knife–and the gun was used by a police resource officer. And as we would find out this afternoon, the student in Waukesha was armed with a pellet gun–not a firearm. It certainly makes the case that our existing laws worked in preventing these minors from actually possessing a real gun.

Secondly, I got to witness the most boorish behavior by parents as they attempted to pick up their kids from Perry Tipler Middle School. One man nearly ran over a Community Service Officer at the intersection of Witzel Avenue and Eagle Street because the CSO wouldn’t let him turn onto Eagle when the traffic pattern established by the police required everyone to go down a few blocks and double back so the buses could get the kids to the school. That was followed by profane yelling from the driver and a stern warning from the State Trooper also on the scene. And then, while talking with parents picking up their kids, I witnessed at least a dozen other parents profanely berating school district personnel trying to direct them to the lines outside Perry Tipler for student pickup. Many were refusing to provide photo ID as required by the district’s plan. Others refused to wait in the long lines and felt they should be entitled to just bust into the building, grab their kid, and go before everyone else.

Those of us in the media have fully expected to cover something like today’s events for some time. Not because of our “gun culture” or a lack of gun control laws–but rather because of the examples that today’s parents set for their kids–furthered by the lack of accountability within today’s education system–that not only breeds but fosters the youth unable to deal with challenges on their own.

And if lawmakers want to “do something”, how about working on measures that require school districts to remove disruptive or threatening students and prevent them from returning to distract or enact violence upon their classmates? Or how about returning to involuntary commitments of those that exhibit patterns of violent behavior, as we did for centuries before our blind faith in psychotic drugs and therapy kept those who would do us harm on the streets. I’m willing to pay more in taxes for it, as it will keep us a lot safer, and protect our Constitutional rights.

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Because the school get paid per students attending. So trouble making still bring in money.

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