Uscca plead guilty and you’re not covered!

I keep hearing people complain about the USCCA like the one below.

You plead guilty…… you’re admitting fault to the situation. They’re not here to get you to plea, they’re here to help support you fully legally defend yourself and clear your name when you’re not in the wrong.

Also I don’t think it puts a good name in the USCCA when headlines read

“USCCA DEFENDS MURDERER AND HELPS THEM PLEA OFF THEIR CASE”
And then the details in the article states how USCCA should be disbanded, because USCCA is no longer representing legal responsibly armed Americans, they’re representing criminals and their reckless acts and helping them get off on there charges.

Now the USCCA is going to be in more hot water and a push for more states to outlaw services of USCCA like Washington State and New Jersey, and further pushes the narrative that this isn’t self defense insurance this is murder insurance.

So remember.

You plead guilty, you admit fault.

USCCA only covers those that aren’t.

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Great point, @Forensic_Wow! USCCA membership benefits cannot assist when it’s an illegal activity. All of the details can be seen here:

View Self-Defense Liability Policy

Thanks for sharing the details, @Forensic_Wow!

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I seem to remember a coupe of related discussions on this board, but can only find one for now

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I saw one tuber complaining that they gave him a script to read… the comment I left was hey DA, I’m pretty damn sure every company would require you stick to the script so the business wouldn’t get sued for something you promised or such.

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I’m not a lawyer, however I stayed in a Holiday Inn Express once or twice!

I have been in a position of representing clients in their attempt to get VA benefits. (for free)

If the client fails to accept my advise and wants to deal with the system in his/her own way, I have to look for the exit.

You engage representation because you want the benefit of their expertise.

My suggestion is not trying to go it on your own. Use the attorney!

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I am an attorney and this is not as simple as it seems. When all things are black and white, answers are simple. Very few things are purely black and white and there are more than 50 shades of gray.

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You mean “50 shades of gun metal gray”

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Absolutely! Let the professional guide the way. IMO

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Are we saying, if I follow the advice of the lawyer and I’m found guilty that I forfeit all of the benefits of the policy?

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Due process. From what I read USCCA attorneys will do their very best to overlook evidence, point out things that the prosecutor and police missed, and get the case dismissed before it even goes to trial.

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There is no such thing as plead guilty to get it over with ! Bruh! If it was rape would you? Murder would you ? I can’t…… you never plea to something you haven’t done. I don’t know. Some of you are not doing the right thing. Educate each other they have resources here are they really members. First my gun is concealed and not shown until it’s used. Second every bullet in my guns has a lawsuit attached to it I hate to think about it we are not police , we don’t get the benefit of the doubt or qualified immunity we get a trip to jail they sort some things out and then you post bond ideally and await trial in this course of action I never mentioned we plea to a lesser charge of what manslaughter, in protecting ones self know enough to not say a word

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I get to spend a fair amount of time with one of our Network attorneys. He’s a really sharp guy with a swift tongue. On one instance a person asked him how many cases he has lost. Without missing a beat he said, “Every one where my client has opened their mouths and said something stupid before I got there.” :rofl:

You plead guilty to a criminal charge it’s the equivalent to asking your insurance benefits to help you re-build the house you set on fire. Give THAT one a try and let me know how well it works for you.

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I actually like that anology

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Ron White- " The cop told me I had the right to remain silent but I didn’t have the ability." When the cop advises you of that part of Miranda, that’s the last time he’s your friend except for the part that says “anything you say CAN and WILL be used against you in a court of law!” Be nice, but SHUT UP!! The cop’s job is to gather information about the incident. That’s all. You can’t win your case talking to the cop but you can lose it for sure. Let the attorney do it for you when the correct time comes.

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Everything you need to stack the deck in you favor is on the script on the back of your USCCA membership card. Follow the instructions and only say what it tells you to say!

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Also I would like to add on to your advice….

THE COPS CAN ASK YOU QUESTIONS THAT THE COURT CAN’T!!!

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One plus one equals two.

Common sense 🤦

But I know it’s rare today😐

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Excellent point, Enzo_T. The process has been studied and re-studied to bring about the correct results. This organization is here not just to make a profit, but to bring about a result that is advantageous to the member. This needs to be understood and internalized.

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There’s that, too. I should have included that in my post.

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There are a lot of unknowns in this. I worked many civil insurance defense cases where the insurer defended under a “reservation of rights” where there were questions as to whether coverage existed. Most of these cases were resolved without a final resolution of the coverage question or with a favorable result for the insured.
But the realities of litigating a case are not simple. For instance, say you go in to a place that prohibits firearms and you are involved in a self defense incident. Would you be willing to plead to a minor criminal trespass charge to avoid the murder or attempted murder charge? What I do not know is how the insurer will look at such a plea Yes, it is a guilty plea but is not related to the actual self defense claim. There is also the reality of the costs/expenses of litigation. Most insurers I have worked with want to minimize the costs/expenses incurred. If faced with the question of whether proceeding to trial on a major felony charge or allowing the insured to plead to a violation or misdemeanor, at a fraction of the cost, I would be inclined to believe the insurer would lean toward the latter. And the plea to criminal trespass significantly hinders the civil claim for the monetary damages for bodily injury or wrongful death.
Insurance companies are in the business to make money. The way they make money is by saving money.

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