Uscca instructor

Strongly considering becoming an instructor for 2 reasons. 1 to keep up my own skills and 2 think the uscca is great and want inform others but not really sure where I would teach…don’t want the hassle of starting a business with building insurance etc…anyone have input on this?

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If you have the time, money and training area, go for it. Lots of instructors here to comment. :us:

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@BRUCE26 ok but wouldn’t it be somewhat a waste of time if I don’t actually instruct?

I’m interested in this topic, as well. I don’t really have the aspiration to teach classes, and I doubt there’s room in my market for one more instructor. I’m just curious about additional training. There are a few places to train around here, but none of them are offering classes that I feel could really build me up. My thought was that if I trained to the level of those who are doing the training, that would give me an improvement goal.

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There is a difference between building one’s skills and learning how to teach a subject. Becoming an instructor involves a good deal of the latter.

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Are you saying that the work to become an instructor is more about teaching technique?

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I was writing in more general terms. I’ll let a USCCA Instructor comment on USCCA’s specifics.

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@Ouade5 the impression I got from the instructor program overview is yes…most of the focus is on teaching techniques

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OK. That would be helpful to know, either way. I have been a teacher and a coach, both in public schools and in business. If the USCCA instructor path is more centered around teaching techniques, then it’s not what I’m looking for at the moment. I’m more concerned with improving my technique, learning alternative techniques, and increasing my knowledge of firearms, including legal considerations.

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I believe the USCCA instructor certification requires that you teach a certain number of classes/students every year to maintain your certification. That is the main reason I haven’t looked into taking the classes. I have no time/ interest to teach outside of my family and neighbors at the moment. The training could be useful for me to help them learn. But the certification would expire before I might want to use it in the future.

Will be using my funds for personal skills training.

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@Ouade5 as far as training it’s pretty impressive the amount of training materials on the uscca website…including legal. The ask an attorney section has around 21 hours of video

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@Shamrock good to know thanks

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Maybe I’ll just wait until USCCA has a “Certified Smart-aleck” and then go that route.

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I took the USCCA “Introduction to Defense” course last year in January. The most personally valuable part of the class was a small change to my grip suggested by the instructor - the entire class was valuable, but that was my biggest takeaway.

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@Shamrock may as well use the money for more rounds lol

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So I guess what I should be looking at is the Level 3 qualification from USCCA. Except I’ll need to upgrade my membership and find someone in my area who can lead the range instruction.

Ammo is always good. I eventually want to do some force on force training.

Though now I may need to save up for some additional smart-aleck training before @Ouade5 nocks me off the top of the smart
-aleck hill;)

:point_up:
Yeah…

To have “USCCA Instructor” badge and don’t teach… might be considered as wasting the money. I’ve never seen any skill nor knowledge improvement just being Instructor. It’s good to be an Instructor, so you can teach if time comes, but at this moment you just pay to gain teaching techniques, not firearm knowledge.

I’d invest the money for USCCA Classes (Defensive Pistol, DSF1, DSF2) - this knowledge and skills stays with you forever…

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@Shamrock what’s force on force?

You train real scenarios with non deadly firearm, fe. airsoft guns.

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