Skill, Luck or Both?

I’m going with a big dose of Luck. :slightly_smiling_face:

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445 ft lbs energy at impact.

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1.44% hit rate.

Whats up with the scope though?

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[image]

tacomhq.com

Charlie TARAC - tacomhq.com

• The Charlie TARAC is a periscope that optically shifts your target image higher so you aim higher to compensate for bullet drop. The result is an optical, not mechanical, elevation gain to shoot beyond your scope’s travel. • Targets that exceed your scope’s travel, return to zero, deploy the Charlie, and dial the difference.

https://tacomhq.com/charlie-tarac

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69 try’s for the first hit? OK. But if he didn’t make the second hit on the 70th shot I’m calling it luck.

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Yup, and they admitted it wasn’t repeatable. Sooo… Luck, a whole lot of time and money spent on luck.

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At that distance he is literally shooting a probably 45 degree angle just to get it that far.

So luck plus alot of patience and money.

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But, they have a framed world record to hang on the wall.

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100 people will try to repeat this. 1 person will come up with .4160 round to make the hit rate 75%

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If the hit rate is 1.44% according to Alexander8 I would call it bad luck.

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1,092 moa adjustment. I worked with numbers all my life, and that boggles my mind. The scope mount rail on the rail cracked me up, especially considering they weren’t shooting.22lr lol.
Aim for the sky, and hope no Cessnas are out sightseeing.

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The rifle was only at about a 16.87° angle depending on bullet drop. I would have thought it was more than that. Assuming 1” is 1 minute.

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60 minutes per degree, so that’s 1,012.2 minutes right there. Iirc, 1 moa is 1.014" at 100
yards. Got 100 yards 77.4 times over. Good detail here. 24 seconds airtime, 12" bullseye which the msm article I read didn’t mention, and had the keyboard warriors saying the team sucked and they could do better. At 4.4 Miles, Wyoming Team Sets New Rifle Shot World Record | Cowboy State Daily

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From your linked story, it stated it was an 8" bullseye:

the 69th attempt that morning, to land inside an 8-inch orange bullseye. The bullseye had been painted in the center of a white, rectangular target measuring 120 inches wide and 92 inches tall.

I did not see anything showing the angle of the rifle as fired, however, the story mattm posted stated the rifle was on a ridge, so it would not need to be at as sever an angle as if it were on the same elevation as the target. Regardless, still amazing to hit with a rifle at that distance - 24-second flight time.

The angle of the rifle’s barrel, coupled with shooting from a ridge above the target, accounted for the arc in the bullet’s trajectory

From the linked story by the OP:

The target’s dimensions (120 inches by 92 inches) made it 1.54 MOA wide and 1.18 MOA tall at 4.4 miles.

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Looking at the rifle, I would say that technology also played a part. That’s not my Dad’s 30-40 Craig with open sites!!

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If you read this article: World Record Extreme Long Range Shot 4.4 Miles - Nomad Rifleman they tell about the whole process and credit a lot of it to just plain blind luck. Fascinating article, though…

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Absolutely, that hit was nothing BUT lucky. The first 68 shots were unlucky and unskillful. :confused:

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Out of curiousity, I looked up flight time for artillery shells. WW2 stats showed as long as 42s.

Lucky to have such a gun and scope, but 68 shots to correct for errors?
Unless the wind kept changing on him, he should have been able to walk it in to the target.
I suspect he was over compensating for a while…

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