Shooting grip. Different?

Hi all,
Just wondering if you all have seen the new Lena Miculek tv ad?
Reason I am asking, something that I saw raised an eyebrow and intreged me…
Lena was shooting a 365 with her support hand trigger finger wrapped around the trigger guard. I thought humm, interesting…
So just for the heck of it I tried the that style of grip during my dry fire drills and had a couple of conclusions…

  • by wrapping your finger around the trigger guard(I found) feels as though you can pull the gun down for a faster follow up shot( will test theory at the range) it also seemed to open up more area for the support hand to cover the week side of the gun.
  • It did feel a little in natural to me, I guess with all thing practice, yet I also found that my middle finger had to use more strength to stay wrapped around my strong hand. Again, just more practice and the gripper weight system will fix that…
    I have medium to large hands, I also tried on my HK vp9sk, cz PCR and my cz p 01 tactical.
    Was curious what all your thought were? Do you shoot this style,or have you been and what have you found to be results?
    Thanks all!
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In training we were all taught by the instructors, to do it the NRA AND USCCA way.

After my small fortune of ammunition, after a solid 10, 000 rounds, I found out a few things.
When you were using .40 SW ,45 ACP, and 9MM, Compacts and Sub-Compacts you could gain better control by operating your Firearm this new way. Respectfully, it is great at practicing, but it is a bad habit to take over you and hard to break. Real life needs for speed and control for emergency reasons. You have to find a firearm that fits properly in your hands and I use a 10 mm now and it is easier to train with. It shoots better than a .44 Magnum and accurate.

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I have been doing some dry fire with that grip, I must say it is funky. I do feel like you could have more control for sure. Next time I go to the range I am going to play with it and see what the results are. I will post here after

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I used that grip for many years for the reasons you stated.

An RO that was a retired Police firearms trainer came over to me and said “Gary, you shoot really good, would you like to shoot better”? The only thing he did was change my grip to the “Combat Grip” which is described in extreme, lengthy detail in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jVbvwWtWIA

Even though some pistols come with texture on the front of the trigger guard, I will never go back. If you do a torque analysis, you will discover you have more power/control over recoil with both hands on the grip.

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I haven’t seen her, but I’ve seen few other people gripping this way. Mostly with winter gloves.
I’ve tried this method…but looks like muscle memory already took over and I don’t see it comfortable.
However what I’ve noticed - sometimes during fast draw stroke I accidentally grip this way (I treated it as bad grip). Because there is no time to correct the finger position I just shoot like this.
So looks it is a good idea to practice it from time to time, like one hand shooting.

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Look at the front of the trigger guard. See the serration and the concave design of the front of the trigger guard itself? It’s there for a reason. This is more pronounced on some models of pistols, tending to be featured most prominently on newer versions of compact and sub-compact semi-auto hand guns. But you will also see it is very common on Glock and Springfield XD hand guns of all sizes (and more pronounced).

I’ve been teaching this grip for over a decade to people who show up with a pistol bearing this feature. My EDC pistol was a Sig P250C from 2012-2018. It’s really all a fit and comfort thing. Your grip should feel as natural as possible. And that may require minor modifications (NOT fundamentals changes…tweaks) when you change pistols.

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Yep, serrations on the front of the trigger guard are like the picture you have in your hallway that you see all the time, then don’t see anymore. UNTIL your friends/guests come over and say Nice picture and you reply what? Oh yeah, thanks! :rofl:

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I had to go and look. Her dad does not shoot with his finger on the front of the trigger guard, so I would suspect it is a way for her to be faster in competition and to bring/keep the pistol down out of recoil when fractions of a second count.

I have tried shooting that way and it did not feel natural for me so I keep using the standard combat grip.

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Interesting. I had to look it up.

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I usually use a Weaver Stance, though I am comfortable with and have trained with both the Weaver and the Isosceles. I have put my off hand index finger on the trigger guard, at times, especially with a firearm designed for such as the trigger guard has a concave form and serrations.

But, it is whatever you are comfortable with, that has a strong firm grip on the firearm.

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You know, that doesn’t look like a bad grip. Next time I go to the range I am going to try it. I’m going to try it with both my Ruger LCP 380s. I’ll let you know how it works out.

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@Johnnyq60,

I tried it on my SR9C but it doesn’t have serrations on trigger guard. Could work on XDS but I don’t want different grips on different guns. Will stick to standard.

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I hear you brother :+1::+1:

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@Ferdinand1

That’s the exact grip I was trained with and used post military.

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It seems like a comfortable grip my brother.

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It is comfortable and one thing I really like about it is that it aligns your thumbs correctly.

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We are talking about this grip so much we all have to go to the range soon and try it, I’m curious.

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I do not personally use this grip or advocate for it, but… Grip and stance rely heavily on properly executed fundamentals in order to shoot accurately. Not all grips or stances are the same for different individuals. For example, if you took every baseball player and had them stand and grip the bat exactly like Ted Williams not all of them would be successful, in fact I would argue very few would be successful. But regardless of the stance or grip, if fundamentally sound, success will be found.

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Fundamentally any grip you choose and practice with can be very effective given the appropriate amount of practice. The issue with the wrap your off hand finger around the trigger guard is that in a high stress situation your hands will clench and in doing so that finger will pull the pistol off target. Anatomically speaking your hands are trying to make fists and in an extreme circumstance you could actually disarm yourself because your right hand (a$$UMeing right hand dominant) has been trained to be firm but relaxed. That is a bit extreme but you get the point. If BOTH hands are CLENCHED then the grip even while under strain remains the same with both hands locked together. Anytime you extend a lever away from the fulcrum the effect is proportionately more significant. I played with this some decades ago, got good at it and then changed grip and got better across multiple platforms YMMV.

Cheers,

Craig6

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Everything old is new again. That’s how we used to do it in the 80s and it’s becoming popular again. Not new, just different from current doctrine and might become current doctrine again. No general best way of doing it. Just have to try and see if it works better for you. I used to shoot that way and never felt natural. I like my grip now but I’ll play with it to see how it goes.

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