Grip safety on your concealed carry

I know grip safeties have been on handguns for a very long time and many people have defended them selfs with a firearm with a grip safety. But i started to wonder is a grip safety a good ideal on a concealed carry gun. We practice are draw from the holsters. Well we should be practicing it and if you do it enough you get pretty good at it but there are still time we don’t always get the perfect purchase on the grip and with a grip safety you have to have it griped right… Now through in a stressful self defense situation. What is your opinion

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If you practice with grip safety there is no way it would bother during the draw or delay the shot. It is just there. You put the hand on the grip and cannot miss it. Unless you are doing it this way: :ok_hand: or :pinching_hand:

I was never a fan of the grip safety on a pistol. Maybe that’s a reason I got rid of it also. I should have made a better choice. Anyways that’s just another thing you gotta worry about when trying to get a better purchase. It just didn’t work for me. But I’m sure it would work for others.

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Stressful situation your grip my not be perfect an there for you wont full engage the grip safety.

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No matter how stressful the situation is you always put the hand on grip. Grip safety is located on the spot which cannot be missed if you want to pull the trigger.
But it might be only me… I cannot say that it works for everybody. However I’d say grip safety is more convenient than thumb safety in stressful situations. You cannot miss grip safety, but you can miss thumb safety (it has happened to me during classes).

Like I mentioned - practice is the key.

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My daughter’s .380 EZ has a grip safety and it’s fairly stiff. Which is causing her to shoot more left than she likes so we are working on her left hand strength.

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I also have the MP Shield EZ and love the grip safety. I actually love it. The only times I have difficulty with it is when I’m holding it with both hands. I tend to shoot more to the left also, but still close to the mark. I have learned that I’m a far better shooter with one hand on any gun than with both hands. I try to focus too hard when I have both hands on the gun. I know I need to practice much more with two hands.

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I shoot a 1911 a lot, own more than a few, and carry one daily. I have never ever had an issue or even noticed it. I think the better question is, has anyone ever had an issue with a grip safety? I have not, nor have I seen anyone have issues with them, and that includes new shooters with little to no knowledge of proper grip, just picking it up and shooting. And this goes for other guns such as XD’s as well. I guess the same theoretical argument could be made about my Glocks and their safety trigger. In a stressful situation, it is possible for me to not grip the gun properly and not be able to engage the trigger properly and not be able to fire the gun.

That said, the spring pressure should be just strong enough to accomplish the task, not so strong that it impacts the user’s ability to shoot it as @Zavier_D mentions.

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I carry mostly 1911 variants. I own and have owned a bunch of them. I have fired probably hundreds of them over the years from old military guns dating back to the early 1900s to modern high speed fighting guns. we are talking MANY 10s of thousands of rounds… and not ONCE has the grip safety ever been a problem even when drawing and shooting from “unorthodox” positions under a lot of stress.

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Are you drawing from inside the waste band or out side the waste band make a big difference I do know that in a class of 15 we we’re all told to to carry aiwb with a Springfield XD. We were attacked from behind all of us ended up on or stomach with trainer on top simulating be hind attacks and as 90% were able to draw the gun in this position more then half did not engage the safety far enough the first pull of trigger. But i guess there is a difference in range training and true force on force training where someone may be really trying to take your gun from you and get a hand on it and impedes you frim grip

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I have been shooting a XDs for a few years now and have never had an issue with the grip safety.

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Hi Shawn,

I carry mostly AIWB nowadays. In any case, exactly because of potential scenarios as you describe, carrying a firearm is only part of my total personal SD plan. Anyone that tries to attack me from behind will find out that there are two knives on me that can be deployed SWIFTLY while my arms are pinned down and if you are on me you will be bleeding profusely from a bunch of highly undesirable places before you figure out what is going on.

Also if you have your hand on my gun trying to take it away from me you are close enough for me to cause a whole lot of damage to you and you will have a broken hand (at the very least) in seconds. There is no point in having a wrestling match for a firearm if I can use other knowledge/skills to disable you without firing a shot.

Yes there is a big difference between “range training” and actual “force-on-force” and one is BOT substitute training for the other. But if someone has a hand on you and it impedes your “firm grip” on your firearm, you already screwed up and lack of a grip safety in an of its own will not be your saving grace because you are lacking training in other areas.

Stay safe!

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There is a real difference in even simulated force on force training. People with guns get very complacent vs other weapons. Guns are not magic wands in CQB. I would posit that if we are in physical contact at CQB I would prefer a blade.

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Great points thank you

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My EDC has anywhere from 4 minimum to who knows how many blades. Much like you I will do my utmost to make an assalaint wish to be elsewhere

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That is very true and i agree 100% that is why i carry 2 blades but this training exercise did make me think about a grip safety as i had never fired a gun with a grip safety until then as i have always carried a glock 19 or m&p and dont get a chance to shoot many other guns …but my lack of knowledge with that type of safety left me to ask this question

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Also if you have your hand on my gun trying to take it away from me you are close enough for me to cause a whole lot of damage to you and you will have a broken hand (at the very least) in seconds. There is no point in having a wrestling match for a firearm if I can use other knowledge/skills to disable you without firing a shot.

Yes there is a big difference between “range training” and actual “force-on-force” and one is BOT substitute training for the other. But if someone has a hand on you and it impedes your “firm grip” on your firearm, you already screwed up and lack of a grip safety in an of its own will not be your saving grace because you are lacking training in other areas.

I am in the same thinking as you but as a grown 35 year old male I stand 5’6 weigh 130lbs and 4 rods in my leg and hip . I do have some formal fight training and not weak by far but i do know that that are a lot of guys out there that are a lot bigger and stronger and faster do to injury that if someone 6’2 270 lbs grabs a hold of me or my firearm im not positive i would be able to brake his hand. But also i understand the importance of other tools knifes fight training and its up to us to do those things but there are people out there that don’t know how to fight or don’t carry a knife for self defense and they are in that situation

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Carrying all of that is nice along with a extra magazine the edc flashlight the ankle med kit but. I spend 10 hrs outside working climbing in and out of holes and carrying 80 lbs missionary stones busting up concrete. All that said to say sometimes your job dictates how much you can carry .

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I’m not saying everyone should carry like I do. I’m retired/disabled so I rely far more heavily on tools than most do.

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