September Is National Preparedness Month 2023

I guess in SHFT scenarios, the local coal fired plant will continue to operate and provide you with power. Just as the grid did in the Texas ice storm a couple years back.

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Coal oil or NG they will be just fine.

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Lots of lists and ideas to get you prepared. :slightly_smiling_face:

Emergency Preparedness Resources – Be Prepared - Emergency Essentials

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And they will be working and sending you a bill during a SHTF event. Magical thinking by non-preppers in my view.

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Well you view doesn’t match the reality that is out there.

What happened in TX was a very short term event and not even related to this discussion.

Here in Florida after a hurricane the loss of power can be as much as four weeks and most of us get by just fine.

So don’t preach prepping to me until you can demonstrate you can do it better that we can down here.

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And after Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico’s centralized electric grid was pretty much destroyed. And after the tsunami that destroyed the Fukashima plant, it’s still not operating. I prefer solutions that provide me with power without waiting for centralized, government run or regulated power providers to figure out to become functional.

You may be willing to live without power for 4 weeks, but not me. Pumping water from a 680’ well requires electric power.

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I don’t live without power, I have backup generation and stored fuel, that is known as preparing.

I guess you don’t get that concept.

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Some thoughts on sharing. :thinking:

Some Ground Truth–
The “Us” & the “Them” in a Societal Collapse

Originally posted at www.SurvivalBlog.com
Copyright 2012
I am a retired Army warrant officer working for the Army
teaching Electronic Warfare and Signal Intelligence. I only
started reading your blog last week. It’s addictive, but
slightly disturbing.
Having worked for the Army for 27 years in a number of
different failed countries I may have a unique perspective
on survival that I would like to share with your readers. I
believe most of the “survivalist community” is vastly underestimating the impact that other humans are going to have
on their plans. Hunkering down and waiting for everyone
to die off is a simplistic plan and I believe has almost no
chance of working. You may be able to hide your retreat,
but you can’t hide the land it sits on. That land itself may
become a scarce commodity if the US transitions to an
agrarian economy.
Food is the key resource. Most communities are at risk because they simply don’t have enough calories stored to get
them through any kind of crisis. But, storage is no more
than limited capital to allow people time to grow more
food. Food production requires land…if your retreat is sitting on farmable land, it will be a scarce resource.
Carrying capacity of the US using non-petroleum farming
techniques is far lower than most of your readers probably
think. Also, most areas of the US, especially cities, don’t
have anywhere near enough farm-able land to go back to
some kind of agrarian pattern. Without public infrastructure and modern transportation, we are going to experience a huge die-off caused mostly by starvation. In a total
collapse scenario without immediate restoration of the
economy, basically everyone who lives in a city is doomed
unless they can take over some kind of farm land.
If you live in an area without enough farm land, you will be
a “have not”. Period. I don’t care how much food you have
stored in your basement.
Here is my key point. These teeming millions will not just
starve and go away. I believe that anyone who thinks they
can defend a working farm against raiders is deluding
themselves.

  1. People are dangerous. They are the most dangerous animal on earth. You can never lose sight of that! In almost
    any society breakdown scenario you can think of, you will
    be surrounded by starving predators that are much more
    dangerous than tigers. In the USA, every one of them (or
    at least the vast majority) will be armed with firearms. The
    ones currently without firearms will obtain them by any
    means necessary including looting government armories.
    These are thinking-breathing and highly motivated enemies.
  2. Raiders, defined as “outlaw looting groups” may be a
    threat for a very short period, but I really don’t see groups
    of more than 4-6 ever forming…they will be quickly replaced by much larger groups of “citizens” doing essentially
    the same things, but much better armed and organized.
    An Example: A few hours after Albania’s political crisis in
    1998, (which was caused by a national lottery scam), almost every adult male in the country procured an AKM
    from government stocks. Armories were the first targets
    looted. I flew into Tirana packing a pistol and a sack of money, naively thinking I would be able to move around the
    country and defend myself. What a laugh. Everyone had
    me outgunned, and the vast majority of them had military
    training of some sort. I never got out of the capital city.
    Every road seemed to have roadblocks every few miles,
    blocked by armed local citizens.
  3. Without central authority, people don’t just starve and
    go away. They form their own polities (governments).
    These polities are often organized around town or city government or local churches. They may call it a city counsel or
    a committee or a senate.
    Some Ground Truth–
    The “Us” & the “Them” in a Societal Collapse
    408
    The bottom line is,
    “We The People” will do whatever
    “We” have to do to survive.
    And that specifically includes taking your storage goods.
  4. When (not if) a polity forms near you, you had better
    be part of that process. If not, you will be looked upon as
    a “resource” instead of a member of the community. The
    local polity will pass a resolution (or whatever) and “legally” confiscate your goods. If you resist, they will crush you.
    They will have the resources of a whole community to draw
    upon including weapons, vehicles, manpower, electronics,
    tear gas, etc. Every scrap of government owned equipment
    and weaponry will be used, by someone. Anyone who
    plans to hold out against that kind of threat is delusional.
  5. The local polity that forms is almost certainly going to
    make mistakes. Some of them are lethal blunders. Odds
    are, the locals will probably not have given a lot of serious
    thought to facing long term survival. They will squander
    resources and delay implementing necessary actions (like
    planting more food or working together to defend a harvest). They may even decide to take in thousands of refugees from nearby cities, thereby almost insuring their own
    longer term starvation.
    A much better approach is to be an integral part of the
    community and use the combined resources of the community to defend all of your resources together. This would
    be much easier if a high percentage of the community were
    like minded folks who were committed to sharing and cooperating. Because any community with food is likely going
    to have to somehow survive while facing even larger polities, like nearby cities, counties or even state governments.
    Don’t expect to face a walking hoard of lightly armed, starving individuals. Expect to face a professional, determined
    army formed by a government of some kind.
    A small farming community can probably support a few
    outsiders, but not very many. The community will need to
    politically deal with outside polities or they will face a war
    they can’t win. Hiding the fact that you are self sufficient is
    going to be hard. You can’t hide farm land.
    Defending your resources against the nearby city will be
    even harder. You may be able to save the community by
    buying protection with surplus food…if you have prepared
    for that. You may indeed have to fight, but stalling that
    event for even a year could mean the difference between
    living and being overwhelmed. In any case, your community needs to go into the crisis with a plan. You may be able to
    shape that plan if you become a community leader instead
    of a “resource”. With Very Kind Regards, - R.J.
    Charity in Disaster Situations–Insuring the
    Cohesion of the “We”
    At the risk for sounding preachy, I’d like to re-emphasize
    the importance of storing extra logistics so that you can be
    charitable when disaster strikes. Charity is Biblically supported, and makes common sense. (I strongly advise it,
    regardless of your religious beliefs.) When the Schumer
    Hits the Fan (SHTF), you will want neighbors that you can
    count on, not people that you fear or distrust. By dispensing copious charity to your neighbors that did not have the
    same foresight that you did, you will solidify them as strong
    allies instead of envious potential enemies. In describing
    communities, psychologists and sociologists often talk in
    terms of the “we/they paradigm”. Typically, this is used in a
    negative connotation, such as when they describe racism.
    (And rightfully so–I loathe racism.) But I can see something
    positive in building an appropriate “we/they” distinction
    during a societal collapse–the distinction between your
    local community and predatory outsiders. Just ask anyone
    that has ever lived “inside the wire” at a Forward Operating
    Base (FOB) in Iraq. Those soldiers will tell you that they felt
    a strong cohesive bond, and were absolutely determined.
    to repel anyone that attempted to attack their FOB. Their
    steadfast resolve can be summed up with the words: “They
    are not getting through the wire. Period.” Dispensing charity helps build a cohesive “we” and draws into sharp contrast the “they.” (In my view of the near future, the “they”
    will likely be roving bands of criminal looters. Imagine a
    situation like in the movie The Road Warrior, and you are
    inside the perimeter at the refinery. Can you see the appropriate “we/they”?)
    By logical extension, you can dispense significant charity
    only if you have it to give. Clearly, you must stock up above
    and beyond your own family’s needs. So, for example, if
    you calculate that you need 300 pounds of wheat for your
    family, don’t buy just 300 pounds. Instead, buy 600, 900,
    or even 1,200 pounds. That might sound expensive, but
    presently you can buy 50 pound sacks of hard red winter
    wheat for around $7 to $8 each. About 45 pounds of wheat
    will fit in a plastic 6 gallon food grade bucket that costs just
    over $2. Or even if you pay more to buy wheat that already
    packaged for long term storage in buckets (from a vendor
    like Walton Feed), a 45 pound bucket of wheat still costs
    just $17.15. Beans and rice are similarly priced. Consider
    that extra food as a key to building a “sense of community.” Even for even those of you that are non-religious,
    dispensing charity will be part of your “we/they paradigm.”
    insurance. If purchased in bulk quantities, it is also cheap
    insurance. Don’t neglect buying your family that insurance!
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Love those prices! Shows just how much inflation there has been in the last 10 years.

One issue with having some extra to give to neighbors is that if you don’t have enough to give all the neighbors all they need you are likely going to get a lot of knocks on the door once word gets out that you have a good enough supply of food that you are giving some away.

Many if not most of the people in my town are more prepared than most but I suspect things would get pretty dicey in an emergency lasting more than a few weeks where outside help wasn’t available. The forest would run out of animals pretty quickly and a can’t afford the small barn worth of grains it would take to feed everyone for an extended period of time. Even at 2012 prices.

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@Shamrock Thanks for reading it. This describes a situation where you may have to buy your way into the new order or have it taken away. All for one and one for all. :thinking:

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Thanks for posting. I like getting different takes on various scenarios. Given the current economic and political challenges I have been doing a lot of looking into what happens when societies break down and how human psychology might play into all of that. Ideally we won’t have a full on meltdown and will just have to deal with something along the lines of a Venezuelan style economic meltdown where things are bad but survivable by most.

But looking at worst case scenario I could see some of what he describes happening in small communities with a fair amount of resources, like farming communities. The polities might be more benevolent under those circumstances though I suspect a lot of them would quickly develop hierarchies that might not be quite so one for all. There are always those that try to take advantage of situations and they often seem to find their way into positions of authority.

I do think in a serious long term breakdown in areas with less resources that the “polities” will likely take on a more warlord like appearance. These groups might start small by picking off individual households but eventually larger groups would form and challenge other groups for their resources. In that case if you don’t have the strength to resist the warlord your likely choices are hoping you have something to offer so you can join them, fleeing before they knock down your door, or dying in place.

Then there is the issue of the corrupt government desperately trying to hold on to power. I could see federal, state and even some local authorities running around appropriating resources from those who were smart enough to prepare for bad times and then redistributing what they didn’t keep for themselves in order to try and maintain control over what is left of the unprepared masses.

I think a lot of people would be forced to do a lot of things they would never dream of doing in a civilized world. Hope no one ever forces me to have to make those choices.

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The LDS Prep goes into many real life scenarios when you have time to read through it. :slightly_smiling_face:

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My goal here is to get as many people as possible to think about preparing. I will try to post all month.
I have been prepping since 2005 after watching the gubment drop the ball during Katrina.
I started out with $50.00 in 2005 and turned it into a multi thousand $ endeavor, this is my retirement stash. :slightly_smiling_face:

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If you are looking for “non GMO” seeds I recommend. If you are in the growing belt.
Heirloom and Open Pollinated Seeds - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds - Heirloom and Open Pollinated Vegetable, Flower, and Herb Garden Seeds (stclareseeds.com)

I buy an assortment every year and vacuum seal them and store in the freezer.

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I give up.

thank you for the link Bruce26
it is what I was looking for

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If you’re referring to Wannabe Dictator Joe - Joe Banana - you’re 100% right. I’ve gone over my preps thanks to BRUCE26 but I’m concerned about these purported lock-downs No worries in my neck of the woods but if the wife and I were to take a drive to a blue city I’m wondering if wearing my JP Spears freedom shirt will be allowed.

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something to consider on the freeze dried emergency packs
try them out now to see if you can stomach them.
use to take ‘‘city boys’’ canoeing up here in Da Yoop on a 3 day trip
had mountain house chicken terryuckie freeze dried for dinner one night
in 15 minutes they were in the woods hurling
the next year I did the menu and carried it down the river in coolers

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If you buy seeds for the long term what I do is turn your oven to 200deg. when it is heated shut it off and spread the packets in a single layer and prop the door open and leave until the oven is cool to make sure no moisture is present
I vacuum seal them in a smaller bag and then vacuum them in a larger bag and store in the freezer with the date. When I want to plant, I use the oldest first. So far, no problems with germination.
I do the same with rice and oatmeal except in a single bag. Moisture is an enemy.
If you order from St. Clare seeds buy in the fall when they harvest to get the freshest seeds. I have four years of seed saved up and will order again soon. All these are heirloom seeds you should be able to harvest your own seeds, by letting them dry on the vine. beans, corn and peas are an example. :slightly_smiling_face:

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Emergency Essentials used to make a quart sized can so you could try the product without buying a #10 can, but with the buying spree after the fake pandemic they stopped making them.