Pushed in the lake

My kids and I were on the pier the other day and joked about pushing me in. Of course they had visions of the retaliation that would follow so they remained the sweet little angels that they are. So anyways got me to thinking I have my edc stuffs on me. Has anyone fell or been pushed in and what is best thing to do with my firearms after such a refreshing plunge may happen. BTW fresh wisconsin water no salt water but also what to do in either situation salt or fresh water swim with edc gear.

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I would definitely break down and clean it out, let it dry and oil. You don’t want anything rusting or anything

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To add on to this… what about leather holster… ammo??

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Like @DarthJediJohnny said - regular maintenance will help, preceded with mandatory dry out period (compressed air, or complete disassembly)

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Ammo - most of good defense rounds have sealed primers, so there shouldn’t be a problem, range ammo - garbage for sure ! However, I would discard soaked ammo in every situation.

Leather holster - wrap firearm with plastic foil and keep firearm in holster, let it dry.

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This is a good topic!!

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Obviously maintenance. But I would discard the rounds, but I’m just paranoid like that. If your phone isn’t waterproofed, try storing it in a sealed container with dry rice.

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Interesting topic for sure. I’m assuming some guns would definitely handle it better than others, like a P229 M11-A1 or a Glock with maritime cups are a couple that quickly come to mind. Regardless I think I’d disassemble and clean thoroughly just to be safe and I enjoy it… Based on some of the unscientific internet tests a quick dip doesn’t seem to bother many of the modern guns to badly. An extended dip though could be a while other story.

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@Thomas681 If it’s a Glock… put sand in a zip lock baggie and put the firearm in it. Shake the bag as the sand will retain the moisture. Then take it out and remove any excess sand by tying the gun to your car bumper (front or rear) and drive around the neighborhood for 10 minutes. Note: Some people say you should unchamber any live rounds. It really comes down to personal choice though.

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Yeah I was just thinking what if. I’m on the boat almost every day during the summer. I know most things are probably going to be ok but how In depth of break down would you need to go for a completely submerged firearm? Inquiring minds you know.

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For myself, I would like to make sure no sand or in my case MUD got in a nook or cranny.

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If it was salt water I would do a complete teardown at the earliest opportunity possible to avoid the corrosive effects of the salt. It will creep into every crevice no matter how tight the gaps. I would probably even do a quick field strip and sacrifice a bottle or two of drinking water to rinse it off right away.
If it was fresh water I would probably just do a quick field strip, drain, and wipe followed by a regular cleaning when I could get to it.

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Agreed with the clean and lube. Blow it all out with compressed air first. I would get rid of the rounds for sure. They would probably be ok, but I could not trust them. Interesting question sir.

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Detail strip and clean (NOT A FIELD STRIP) by a competent gunsmith if you cannot do it yourself. Trash the ammo or at least save it for your next range session. If salt water I would trash the holster, if fresh water I might try to wash it depending on what the holster is made of, but if it got any wetter or dirtier than a little rain water, let your conscience be your guide.

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You just manufactured some new range ammo complete with possible random malfunctions - beware the squib! If a shot “feels” weak, it probably is and may have wedged in the barrel. DO NOT fire again without dissembling and confirming barrel is clear before proceeding further!

I sometimes take my trailer boat out in salt water by myself. The ramp I use has a shallow angle, so the back tires are backed into the water. The ramp is very slippery, I have seen many people slip and bust their butts while holding onto their vehicle or trailer - it even happened to me - once :grimacing: I always keep a spare holster in the car and keep the gun in the car during launch and retrieval, just in case …

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Make sure it’s a zip (glock baggie) or it could fall out.

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:rofl: :joy: :rofl:

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Wouldn’t hurt to switch out your ammo depending on how long your dip was! Most modern weapons with the coating they get won’t rust but I wouldn’t chance it! Dry it off real nice and add a little extra oil and you’ll be rockin n rollin again!

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I spend a lot of time around and in saltwater. When spear fishing we usually have a powerhead on one spear on the off chance a bull or other shark decides we look more tasty than the fish on the stringer. I use both a .223 and .357 PH. A little fingernail polish over the primer and the case seam is how we ‘waterproof’. I’ve fired those rounds after a dive season ends, probably 30+ dives, and never had a misfire. Dive gear all gets a freshwater tank soaking and rinse after each dive. We never let the gear sit and dry before it gets the fresh soaking. I’ve also help recover outboards in saltwater and at times all it took to get them running was the freshwater soaking, pull the plugs, so you can turn it over blowing out the water, fresh lubes, new plugs, and start it up. The key with salt water, IMHO, is keeping whatever wet, lot’s of freshwater soaking, and then lube. Yes I would teardown a firearm, but with some of todays guns one might get away without it. BTW-I’m not a gunsmith or a mechanic and I have not been near a Holiday Inn Express in a decade or two. That means my opinion is worth exactly what you paid for it.

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Make sure you get all the salt off, or you could get charged with salt with a deadly weapon :gun:

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