Preparing for the big threat

Mr. John Lovell goes into detail about active shooter training.

What would your kit include, how would you build your active shooter rifle, how would you store everything, and what is the plan of action?

I know USCCA and other organizations frown upon such a reaction and believe that going home to our families is more important.

2 Likes

My plan of action is not to seek out an active shooter unless, IDK, some super abnormal situation occurs and that situation would pretty much require I Respond with my EDC pistol. The only thing I can imagine that would cause me to respond and seek out a suspected/known active shooter, is if I happen to be at the property of my kid’s school with my firearm lawfully in my vehicle and I find out something is happening right now and there is no LE response yet present.

But this is an extremely unlikely extreme outlier that IMO doesn’t justify any different gear/setup/staging/etc.

Would be done with a concealed firearm and probably get me nowhere past the locked doors anyway.

But it’s about more than going home to your family. It’s also about the potential of diverting resources to address your presence when those resources would otherwise have been going to the real threat.

5 Likes

Lets say you’re at a facility that uses a badge to get in, you have that badge.

In the USCCA course, first phone calls about active shooter aren’t made until 2 minutes after the shooting started, police response time is between 3-5 minutes.

What if the person you’re facing has body armor? Will your EDC be just enough? IF police haven’t arrived yet, would you run back in with better gear? or would you secure the outside front, and speak to the officers when they arrive, and inform them, I have my rifle in the trunk, I have a badge to get in, I’m here to help.

No, I wouldn’t run back in with better gear

Not unless my family is in there. But in that case, I’m not leaving and coming back, I’m going hard, now, with what I have.

I’m also not going to keep that kind of gear in my car. I’m not keeping a rifle in my vehicle, due to theft concerns, and the impracticality (not to mention legality) of being able to flee, but choosing not to, rather, choosing to return. Extreme outlier situation that it could even be a possibility.

Pretty sure the only thing I am going to “secure” is the area around me, if I can’t get away.

6 Likes

I don’t keep an active shooter kit in my vehicle. Unless you count the additional medical supplies I keep there.

The odds of me being anywhere near an active shooter situation are likely well into the billion to one range. The odds of me getting back to my vehicle and grabbing a rifle and body armor to respond to an active shooter without getting on LEO or other responding citizens radar as the active shooter are pretty poor as well. But the odds of having a rifle, magazines and body armor that are permanently stored in my vehicle stolen are much higher. I’d rather not contribute to arming criminals when the chance of actually needing those items is so incredibly low.

In the incredibly unlikely event I was caught in an active shooter situation I would be responding with my EDC either because I had no choice or I had an open window to end the event. But more likely I would be getting the heck out of there since I don’t see anyone else willing or able to feed, shelter, protect and otherwise financially support my family in my absence.

If I could afford to set up a very crime resistant storage system in the back of my vehicle I would consider keeping a rifle and a couple of extra mags there. But it would be more for defense from rabid animals, packs of feral dogs or two legged predators in the remote open areas I spend much of my time. While those threats are rare I am much more likely to encounter them than an active shooter.

5 Likes

I imagine the quick reply would not be in the affirmative.

When I first carried, I recited to myself,
“I am not a cop.”
Repeatedly.

Having said that, I’m not making any promises as each situation is unique.

3 Likes

I wake up every morning with this mindset! I’m completely prepared for what may jump out around the next turn, it’s why I carry in the first place!

By now, I know the threat exists every second of every day. I’m not rushing towards it even if I did dress this way! But I’m confident in my skills and my tools!

5 Likes

Amen on that

3 Likes

I WILL NOT keep firearms in my vehicle, EVER!
If “The Big Threat” comes and I have to fight my way home (5.6 mi from work now)
It will be what I carry ON ME and I pray to GOD that will be enough.
My Ready bag I take into work has My firearm of choice that day, silencer
and (10) mags. My Big Blade, OC, Spare Batt. for my Red dot. (2) flash bangs,
and my med kit. After I stow my bag, ON ME I have my smaller SA XD(M) and (2) mags
my brass knucks and my s&w lock blade, trauma bandage/Quik clot in a belly band .
If that isn’t enough then I am in deeper sh-- than I ever thought would happen.
I WILL MAKE IT HOME TO MY SISTER!

3 Likes


As the topic say’s…Pudding arrives in New Mexico right now.
He almost fell into the grand canyon earlier today but TRAGEDY was averted by
a SS Agent (who NOW) decided to do his job.
Notice his departure from the belly of the plane…less steps.
This country is phucked.

4 Likes

In this case you will need to exercise exceptional marksmanship and find the chinks in his armor. The Ocular, for example. Even if he is wearing ballistic eye protection, one or two hits in the right spots will obscure his vision. If he is NOT wearing ballistic eye protection, well…too bad. You can shoot his ankles and feet.

Go for the gap between the bottom of his chest/abdomen armor and the top of his leg. There is an artery there that will bleed so bad he will be dead before the ambulance gets there.

Shoot his gun or his hands. Even with ballistic gloves, the impact of a pistol caliber round should be enough to at least tell his brain “HOLY CRAP!!! MY HAND HURTS!!!” if it doesn’t break his hand.

In situations like this you can “What If” yourself into a frenzy because you can just keep upping the ante. Your brain can only process logical responses to what is perceived to be seen. “What if, What if, What if”?

What if Tweetie carried an Uzi? Sylvester wouldn’t mess with him.

2 Likes

I am most likely to run into a mass shooter at my workplace, which is a warehouse-type environment. Employees need a badge to get in, so the shooter is most likely to be a VERY disgruntled employee.

As my employer has declared the workplace to be a “weapon-free” zone, and I need my job, I don’t bring my EDC into my workplace. If a mass shooter came in and started blasting, I’d be heading for the nearest exit (of which there are several) with all due haste.

2 Likes

I am sad you work in a weapon-free zone, Brother, but as you stated, you need the job.

I am lucky in that sense as my employer promotes us, his employees, carrying at work. Private companies can do that.

No shame in heading for the door either. If you are outmanned or out gunned, remember this: He who hides and runs away lives to fight another day.

3 Likes

FWIW I’m pretty sure the vast majority of ‘carriers’ do not carry at work.

I’ve only been carrying for a little over 2 years, so I never carried at work since I retired 10 years ago. However fellow butchers were enthusiasts and they would have show and tell on Fridays. Show off new firearms. I never felt threatened at work because someone was always armed. And I always had a knife or cleaver in my hand. For some reason nobody ever robbed the meat department. If I were working these days I would definitely carry. To and from work would be the reason. I don’t understand why an employer would not want responsible age appropriate employees to be armed. Unless they have enough armed security available to protect everyone. And why do some employers think that they have the right to keep employees vulnerable to the evils of our wacko society. If you can’t carry at work do you leave your firearm in your car? If it gets stolen or broken into then the thug now has a weapon. It just doesn’t make sense.

How ready are you for big threats?

Livelihood crises
Extreme weather events
Cybersecurity failure
Digital inequality
Prolonged stagnation
Terrorist attacks
Youth disillusionment
Social cohesion erosion
Human environmental damage
Asset bubble burst
IT infrastructure breakdown
Price instability
Commodity shocks
Debt crises
Interstate relations fracture
Interstate conflict
Cybersecurity failure
Tech governance failure
Resource Geo politization
Weapons of mass destruction
State collapse
Biodiversity loss
Adverse tech advances
Natural resource crises
Social security collapse
Multilateralism collapse
Industry collapse
Climate action failure
Backlash against science

Chinas push for global power
Russian provocative actions
Iranian provocative actions
North Koreas provocative actions
Alien invasion

3 Likes

Are these yes/no questions or multiple choice? :grinning:

5 Likes

An active shooter has identified his/her victims. As a responder, he/she is not shooting at you—yet.
That should give you an advantage.

1 Like

I have to be honest, I’m not even sure what all of these mean or how one would or could prepare for them.

Like, multilateralism collapse? Prolonged stagnation?

Here are some top Big Threats on my list

Car accident
Job loss
Injury that interferes with ability to work
Loss of immediate family member/household member
House fire

2 Likes

One more, “To die”. This one I can answer --Quite prepared.

My concern would be more on the lines of are my children and grandchildren prepared for any or all of the above.

1 Like