Malfunction Junction - Share your stories?

Had a malfunction with the new 22 today. :unamused:
Ok, not the gun but the ammo. Pop…pop…failure to feed. One still in the chamber, and it won’t eject. Hand it over to the gunsmith and he goes and knocks the round out of the chamber. Well knock isn’t exactly right, he says I really had to pound that out of there. Turns out the brass cartridge split and wedged itself in there pretty solidly when it expanded. Here’s pictures:


Have you had an ammo malfunction? Share your stories?

Not me but my wife has has to many problems with her Sig P238. Sig just replaced the extractor and polished the feed ramp, and test fired it and it is still having problems ejecting brass. The slide bites back on the brass and takes a bite out of the brass leaving a V at the opening of the brass. She just got the firearm back from Sig and we just went to the range today and it did it again. Needless to say Sig is going to get an earful tomorrow. I will have to ask her latter where the brass is at and take some pictures.

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I have only seen that once before. It was the same ammo manufacture but I was firing it out of a single shot bolt action .22 (my very first firearm I was 15 at the time).

My father finally got the casing out and thought it was a bad extractor so we took it to a gunsmith. He ended up telling us we had a bad batch of ammo and we should dispose of it and use a different brand.

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Yikes! @BJP that is really broken!

What type of ammo are u useing,might want to check the batch, for case tolerance,if reloading might went to insure sizing is correct

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Just saw the pictures,might be the ammo,grain or powder off changes feed ability,and ejection capability

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What brand of ammo or. A relodad,any pictures of the case bottom,primer area,what caliber,if reload who made primer. They have different strike tolerances, etc can cause issues

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All of those are factory loads ranging from 90 - 95 grain. Winchester white box, Browning, Hornady American Gunner, and S&B. When the firearm was sent into Sig the first time she also sent the brass looking like this so they could see what was happening.

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Sounds like your head spacing is out of tolerance. They will use a No Go guage.

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Really hard to tell without shooting it. Could be the extractor claw violently slinging the casing into the slide without any head spacing issues. As long as there is not a failure to feed issue then they will probably tell you it’s a non issue.

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:thinking: makes that brass mighty hard to reload… that’d be an issue at our place.

Yes it would if your resizer couldnt take the dents out

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While at the range with my Bersa BP9CC (my original EDC) I was firing away with a batch of factory-reloaded ammo I’d bought when there was a rather loud explosion as my eyes clamped shut, a burst of fire singed the hair off my hands, and I felt my gun try to fly out of my hands. One of the brass cartridges was apparently too weak and burst upon firing. There was enough pressure that the bullet exited the barrel, but there was also enough back pressure that it nearly blew my slide off of the handgun. I immediately made sure neither I nor anyone else was injured, and then began disassembling my BP9 for damage assessment. Amazingly, there were not only no physical injuries to me or anyone else, but the handgun was completely unharmed (just force-disassembled in a violent manner). I will NEVER buy factory-reload ammo again. The cost savings per round is NOT worth having the possibility of that event ever happening again.

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That seriously makes me wonder if you had a stove pipe. I’ve seen .22lr’s split like that before but only when there was a stove piped round. Sometimes they blow clear, sometimes they have to be pounded out.

The only other way I know of that this can happen is with a double load of powder and/or a slightly oversized chamber so if it happens again I’d have a chamber casting made and have it mic’d.

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I did my CCW Qualification with a Taurus PT 24/7 .45. I cleaned it the night before, and made sure it was well lubricated. Then, I loaded my allegedly 12 round magazines with 11 rounds, one more than I normally put in them. Every time I loaded a full magazine, I got a double feed.

Every. Single. Time.

My Instructor was happy, though. I did exactly what he’d taught me to do. I got a lot of practice clearing double feeds. My AR did that one time with .223 snap caps one time right after I lubricated it too, now that I’m thinking about it.

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Had this happen recently from a split case… the gunsmith had to use some serious commitment to get it pounded out. Factory new .22lr ammo, no stovepipe though, just a bad case.

Yep, that’s what I was referring to. Sorry if I was unclear.

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Factory reload ammo, as explained to me, consists of casings collected at firing ranges and sent in for reload. While the casings are examined for stress it is not uncommon for some to make it through the reload process with overstressed casings that can/will explode upon firing. That is what happened to me, apparently. It took me running a wooden dowel down the barrel and pound the split casing out of the chamber.

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Same solution on mine. New ammo though, rather than Factory reloads.

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