How accurate does an edc handgun have to be?

At 10 feet? At 10 yards? (Without using your edc Ransome rest)

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Depends, get off me firearm doesn’t even need sights, regular carry, minimum 20 yards. Guess it’s more important how accurate you are…

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Deadly accurate. Judicious marksmanship is Paramount.

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Generally speaking, point shooting at 20 ft should be accurate enough to hit the 2 T’s on the silhouette target. I dont know if this translates into specific MOA or even needs to be.

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It’s very subjective, but I’d like mine to be accurate at 50 feet.
Anyway, my front sights doesn’t allow to see further, covering whole target.

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When shooting targets we are concerned with a relatively small area in the center, which for no obvious reason is called a “bull’s eye.” For defensive shooting we are concerned with “center mass,” which roughly corresponds to the area inside the B-27 target’s “8 ring.” So, accuracy is relative. That does not mean you should accept shots scattered across 3 sq. ft. of target area when practicing, but under stress (competition or a timer) you should be able to put a tight group in the center mass area. Then when SHTF training will kick in and the bad guy can be dispatched. USCCA has some great videos and training addressing this topic. Check out the speed v. accuracy topic. Stay safe.

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Have to be?

Put all rounds inside the 8 of an NRA B8 at 25 yards maybe? Standing unsupported, slow fire.

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@Larry130 Happy Anniversary. :beers:

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After 50 some years of shooting I have noticed most guns are more accurate then the shooter.
The real question is. How accurate should you be. :us:

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Well, if you’re shooting a .50 or a .45 you probably don’t need to be so accurate, the guy probably get scared sh**less just from the BOOM. The rest of us should be able to get center mass at, say, 7-8 yards.

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A gun needs to be able to shoot considerably better than I can, or it’s not worth my time to mess with it. If I don’t know whether a hit or a miss is me or the gun, what kind of practice is that?

I can make a one-inch group at ten yards. If the gun can’t do that, gimme something else. When I get to shooting better, I will want a better gun — but if the gun doesn’t start out better than me, how will I know whether I’m improving?

An inch at 10yd is 10 MoA, which isn’t going to impress anyone with a rifle. But I think I can do some useful defending with it — even if stress makes me five times worse than my best. I might not equal my best calm shot if I’m in fear for my life, so I want to do a lot better than Minute of Bad Guy when I’m threatened by a stationary sheet of paper and a timer. Maybe I don’t have enough accuracy with my current gun if I thought I should be effective at 25yd.

Depends on your mission statement, but I think your gun should be able to outrun you if you can afford it.

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An EDC handgun is very, very, and I “STRESS” very accurate at some distances as long as the BARREL AIN"T BENT!!! Basically, HOW ACCURATE is the gun handler. PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE. Just know the responsibilities you uphold when you carry.

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Got to hit center mass from 15 feet consistently.

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A person should train at 10 to 30 feet and able to hit an eight inch target with consistency and confidence. This takes training and practice and that is why the USCCA stresses training and drills. These are things that will help improve even the most skilled shooters to be better and all of us should always be striving to be better. Not to have bragging rights but, to execute proper operation of your self-defense carry. Having an EDC is a big responsibility that should not be taken lightly. Get training and practice,… it is that important!

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Most documented self-defense shootings have occurred at the distance of 9-15 feet. And most critical incidents happen extremely fast and involve multiple rounds fired.

I don’t teach my clients beyond 30 feet. The USCCA teaches defensive marksmanship.

Stay safe out there.

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Acurate at draw and fire distance :us:

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Sure. Ninety percent of my practice is within ten yards.
But I think @Mike270 inquires “how accurate does the gun need to be”, not the shooter.

I don’t know what activities you use in the USCCA training programs. With common exercises like Dot Torture, 5x5x5, Five Yard Roundup, Cloverleaf — or anything with a “head” shot, 3" x 5" card, or small aiming point — the student can’t really learn much about their shooting development unless the gun and ammo combination is capable of delivering well within those smaller target areas every time.

I don’t know whether there is a common handgun which can’t consistently hit 10MoA. But if the gun itself was only capable of usually landing within 8" at 10yd, I would not carry or train with it.

If I was not reliably hitting, I would rather think it was the gun than my skill which needs a power-up — but really?

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Right on. Accuracy requirement of the gun isn’t necessarily the same as distance at which you focus your training.

That’s been covered above, you guys know the facts, something like ~90% of private citizen defensive gun uses (best we can tell) occur inside of 7 yards. And most of those are 3-5 yards (9-15 feet). But not all.

Whenever I find myself not wanting to see if I can hit a target at 25 yards with my summer carry pistol, I stand in the middle of an aisle at Home Depot or the grocery store and consider how far away a shooter could be that was aiming down that aisle. Unlikely, sure. But, a lot of places out there have significant (to a handgun) distances and no cover

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I’ve never owned a firearm of any kind that wasn’t capable of greater accuracy than I am, and that’s how it should be. That being said, my defensive shooting standard is to hold groups within one MOBG (Minute of Bad Guy) at reasonable defensive distances.

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Let’s not confuse “Accuracy” with “Consistency”. My EDC’s are consistent, touch the target with the dot at 7 yards and I’m dead on or Cover the target with the dot and I’m on.

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