First Aid for Your Protection

Part of being your family’s protector is knowing first aid for a variety of injuries — from bumps and bruises to breaks (or worse).

As responsibly armed Americans, we hope we never have to use our firearms to defend ourselves or our loved ones, but we train for the possibility. It’s the same with first aid. We hope we never have to apply a tourniquet, but having that knowledge could save a life.

What first-aid training have you had? What training do you recommend?

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Stop the bleeding
Start the breathing
Protect the wound
Treat for shock

Is there more?
:thinking:

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Starting when I was 16, I took Advanced First Aid and became a National Ski Patrol–then lifeguard in college, then Registered Nurse.
Recently, the Emergency First Aid Fundamentals that USCCA teaches–it’s a great class. I recommend it.

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I did medicine for 30 years in the military and as a civilian and was exposed to some of the best and worst medical training that this and other nations offer. As part of my training to become an IDC (Independent Duty Corpsman) I did weekends at Yale and Harvard’s Knife and Gun Club (University Emergency Departments). I’ve also had real life trauma events in places like Kuwait, Trashcanistan, Somalia, and Iraq to name a few.

Quite possibly some of the best Real World Training (other than the real thing) I have been exposed to was Wilderness Medicine. There are various schools and individuals out there and I will not point out one over the other but the driving factor is that you are NOT 20 minutes from an ER, you DO NOT have a full medical trauma bag but here is what you can REALLY do with what you have.

The above being said you need a basic understanding of how the human body works so that is where the basic classes come in. Stop the Bleed, Red Cross First Aid, EMT and all the rest are good primers. With the advent of the internet you can actually teach yourself advanced lifesaving fundamentals if you are really interested in knowing the topic.

I have gone from having 3 full trauma bags in my vehicle to include O2, IV’s, injectables and other fancy bits of kit down to something I can stuff in the cargo pocket of my pants. The real capability is between your ears and does not rely on your bag of tricks.

Cheers,

Craig6

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I am in much the same place as @Craig6. I was an EOD tech, and trauma medic in the Navy. Then a flight medic in civilian world.

He pretty much nailed all the big ones. I would add one more just due to this being a CC information site. That would be to know how to diagnose and how to bandage a sucking chest wound.

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Combat Lifesaver training in the Army. If I were in better shape physically, I would probably join the Rescue Squad. I like and am interested in emergency medicine. Amazing subject with such real world and concealed carry applications.

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My friend, ALL chest wounds suck, some in a more literal aspect than others. :astonished: :rofl: :sunglasses:

Cheers,

Craig6

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As someone somewhere once said.

“A sucking chest wound is nature’s way of saying slow down”.

Edited for profanity and to not offend

YMMV
:see_no_evil::hear_no_evil::speak_no_evil:

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Bah dum bum. “Thank you, thank you. I"m here all week.”
Well said.

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I’ll look into the USCCA first aid class. Thanks for the recommendation.

Is there a list of USCCA classes anywhere?

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I have to recertify for First Aid (including trauma, tourniquets etc) and CPR every two years for work. Beyond that very little. I was registered for a Stop The Bleed class before covid got it cancelled.
I am interested in advanced training in that area as well; if there is a place to look up a list of USCCA options please share it! :slight_smile:

You can find in-person classes close to you here, @ScottH:

And there are some books/DVDs/elearning that might help:

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Awesome! Thanks @Dawn

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The best thing is you can take it online. :slight_smile:

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