Good Trauma Medical Training?

Hey everyone. I’m curious if any of you could suggest good trauma medical training courses open to the public. I realize there are several good online resources. However, I’d like to be able to get some hands on training where I can practice applying things such as tourniquets, chest seals, combat guaze, etc. I’ve had some training, however it’s been several years ago. I’m out of practice and lots of things seem to have updated and changed. I live in Northwest TN and would be willing to do a bit of travel if necessary (2 - 3 hours). Thanks in advance.

2 Likes

Best place I know nation wide is Red Cross, not free but best training and yearly certification for CPR.

4 Likes

I’ve had CPR training pretty regularly for a while. Do they do more involved courses as well that deal with things like tourniquets, chest seals, and such as well in most locations?

2 Likes

Some prerequisite certifications may be required for higher learning classes. Most of my medical training came from military, including Tension pneumothorax (chest wounds), tourniquet usage. Times have changed since then so I’ve taken small local classes on basic first aid. There are also plenty of manuals out there. I always keep a fist aid manual in my trauma kit in car.
Good strong basics, will save a life, don’t need to be surgeon. Even trained, I would not perform chest tube insertion in the field. The most important thing I’ve learned, is STOP the BLEEDING.

3 Likes

@Rgladwin52 If you are looking for a pig lab or goat lab in the civilian world you are not going to find one. The U.S. Military has the keys to that lock box and are VERY careful about who they let in. In the civilian world the only time you will get access to that info is through Paramedic training or MD school during your ER rotation. When I went through IDC school in 98’ I did my trauma rotation at Yale and Harvard’s Knife and Gun Clubs (University Hospitals). The trauma Doc’s loved us as we were the bunch that would go “OH Cool” at a multiple GSW or stabbing victim as opposed to the MD students who started of with “Oh My God”, plus most of us had field experience and blood didn’t bother us.

If I was looking to learn how to treat trauma I would look for a serious wilderness survival medicine course and make sure I had my bonifieds prior to attending. I have attended, thanks to taxpayer dollars, at least 6 Wilderness Medicine Schools which taught me more than any week long tour in an ED.

Tactical Medic (TAC MED) is another option but is also VERY hard to get into as you need local or state LEO credentials as they want you on a SWAT team or similar after the fact.

If you are really interested in expanding your skills get some certs from the civilian world and join a volunteer first aid or rescue squad.

Cheers,

Craig6

6 Likes

Thanks. I actually may just do that. I know I’ve seen the practice “dummies” that have tubes run through to simulate arteries and what not. Just have no clue what organizations actually train with them. I have actually been thinking of getting into a volunteer fd, or similar.

3 Likes

A good start is a “stop the bleed” class taught all over the country

2 Likes

Thanks @Bill50. I took their online course. I didn’t know they had in person courses.

1 Like