Eyesight Issues

I am at the age where my drivers license says I now need to wear corrective lenses. I wear multi focal disposable contact lenses most of the time. I actually prefer to just use cheap “readers” for driving and reading. +300 for reading, and +1.75 for driving.
My issues. First of all when going to the range my multi focal contacts either allow me to clearly see my irons or the target, not both clearly at the same time. I have to “manually” focus between the two. Secondly, I could purchase prescription safety glasses… that would work for me at the range but I wouldn’t necessarily have them readily available for self defense.
Anyone have a solution? I do have laser target acquisition tools that aid greatly, but electronics can/will fail.

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I gave up my contacts, as I got older in favor of tri-focals.

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A couple of thoughts - getting older is so much fun! :wink:

I would practice in two different ways. Sighted fire and unsighted fire.

Using your iron sights, focus on the front sight instead of the target. You’ll see the target fuzzy in the background.

Then in the next round, focus on the threat solely relying on having your firearm parallel and in light with your sights. Your focusing on your target, not your sights.

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Yes, electronics can fail. That said, in your situation, I would seriously look at an RMR. Batteries are cheap enough, just change the battery regularly. After sighting in my shotgun for deer season, I’m coming to the conclusion that “optics” are in my near future for most aspects of shooting. Long guns, and handguns.

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I will check with my eye doctor about trifocals. Good idea @Chris3. I hope there are prescription safety glasses available as well… for the range.
@45IPAC My EDC Glock 43 has a “built in” LaserMax slide rail laser. No need for a special holster. Easy 2-way on/off slide lock switch and a red dot or pulsating option. I change the batteries more than suggested by the manufacturer. 2 hours of battery time.

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You could have 20/20 vision and you still wont be able to focus on the target and your front sights at the same time.

I wear progressive lenses and my vision is a lot worse than yours. I’m in the +8 range. All it takes is a minor tilt of the head to transition from the front sight to the target target. With a little practice it becomes second nature.

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How many rounds do you have on that guide rod. Been thinking about getting them. But worried it not the greatest quality.

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I was always taught to focus on the front sight, not the target. I’m getting close to the point where my arms aren’t long enough but I have another year or so.

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I guess what I am trying to say is there is no middle ground. Either extreme focus on the front site or extreme focus on a 21 foot target. I have a pair of readers that are +2.25 and I get that middle ground. But the front site and target are hazy when I try and focus on one or the other. Kinda hard to explain. I need to see my eye doctor.

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@ScottC LaserMax has a good reputation and I have put around 300 rounds down range. A 5 minute install. Not real cheap though, shop around on eBay (@$200+).

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I have had to wear prescription glasses since about 6th grade (should have had them sooner). I now wear no-line progressive bifocals. I have the same prescription in Safety glasses for work and use hem at the range (yes Dawn I had left them in my car, the day we came to The Range we were in Mary’s car).

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I’ve been going through this “change” recently. I began noticing that my arms began getting too short a few years ago and got some readers for up close. To date my distance vision remains beyond exceptional in that I can read the 20/10 line uncorrected. My near vision is about 20/80 and my 30" (mid) vision is about 20/40. I actually used my vision insurance for the first time and ended up with tri-focals after a failed attempt at no line progressives. At my last range trip I was using my mid range lens to get a clear front sight but I am used to shooting “nose down” and I kept forgetting to lean my head back. I may take to bringing some +1.75 readers for precision pistol work. Then again I generally point shoot and don’t look at the sights much in doing so. This getting old crap ain’t for sissy’s.

Cheers,

Craig6

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I just tried an experiment. I set up my indoor dry fire at 21ft. I use the G-Sight LTP laser training system with my EDC. Before I started I “worked out” my eyes by “walking” them along my Brock string for about 5 minutes. It either helped or I imagined it helped. I had a far easier time changing focus from my front site to the target. And found a happy medium. My focus was pretty clear all around. Could it be?

We all getting older… there is no reason to look for a magic… just train your eye muscle

and follow @Dawn’s advice:

"[…] Using your iron sights, focus on the front sight instead of the target. You’ll see the target fuzzy in the background.

Then in the next round, focus on the threat solely relying on having your firearm parallel and in light with your sights. Your focusing on your target, not your sights."

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Red dot or laser seem like the two easiest (and cheap) solutions.

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Update. Visited the eye doctor yesterday and she increased my right (dominant) eye Rx by +.25. It really made a difference. She has worked with many gun owners using contact lenses and said she gets a lot of feedback about what she calls “the fuzzy space” between the front iron and the target. And she told me to continue to use the brock string. It really does help to regularly work out your eyes

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I’ll just have the magic, please. That training sounds like a lot of work.

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