Dangers of the in and out

When does it happen? Where does it usually happen? How does it happen? Why does it happen?
It is often talked about the levels of situational awareness and how you should always be aware of your surroundings but also, a person should know what your transitional areas are and how they are a weakness and why they are a weakness.

First of all, a transitional area is any place where there is a change, and this makes a lot of places that spot, Getting in and out of your car, at a gas station, at a store, at your home, at your work, at the stop light. We cannot avoid these places, but we can be vigilant about our awareness in these areas. Why are these areas a weakness though? Because it opens us up to be approached and when you are getting in or out of your vehicle you usually are not thinking about your surroundings but what chores you have to do next or if you should buy another gun or not. This allows a person to come up on you quickly and take advantage of the Suprise. Especially when you go to get gas and you’re looking at the gas prices and the Joe Biden sticker on the pump that says, I did that! You are not usually looking around and checking your surroundings, you are trying to get your card to work and punch in your code and selecting your type of gas you want. Ten do you want a car wash? All the while person or persons have approached you and are now helping you with your wallet, phone, and car. Probably as you go to put the hose back up after filling it!

Now you have worked hard all day and your tired and hungry. The wonderful partner you have has dinner ready for you and you go to get out of the truck and out of nowhere comes that person or persons to greet you home as they beat you and take your stuff.

If a person is aware of these weak points or avenues of access a person can be prepared and aware of possible threats in these possible areas of danger. If someone is seen and eye contact is made it could detour a person from trying anything but then again there are those out there that just do not care.
Even pepper spray does not stop everyone, but it will stop the majority of everyone and that would be enough to have time to get away. Also, if you just do not like the vibe of a place you are at then you are using your awareness skills to avoid any problems,

Here are some videos to help with this subject.

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Getting gas or other normal life situations USED to be like going for the mail.
Lately things have gotten so out of wack that my way of life, although somewhat unorthodox, serves me well. I leave the house, I am the predator! It’s my lane, my highway, my gas station, in essence it’s my “turf”. I’m continuously scanning the area even while in my car, it’s tiresome, I just don’t want to be the guy that says, “he came out of nowhere”! I’ll know where he came from and where I stopped him!

I hope the lawyers and such are not thinking that I’m look for trouble, I’m scanning for trouble, I think there’s a difference!

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Thanks for the vids. Yes, those can be more vulnerable places and situations. Some with less lighting, secluded. Vehicles, and homes are attractive. Exposes us to a crime when it allows the perpetrator easier access to our property, and or wallets if carried. Blind spots for us. The commentator in the video had some good suggestions.

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Still is. Nothing special about going for the mail The second we open our front door, we are exposed to the world — same as ever. Even behind the closed door really. Always was.

Whether one’s world is objectively more safe, less safe, or about the same, probably depends a lot on one’s location and individual vulnerability. A general sense of subjective “more danger” probably correlates positively with exposure to media hyperbole. May or may not have anything to do with increasing numbers or increasing badness of bad guys afoot in the world.

When I leave the house, I am the prey.
The :rabbit2: prevails by being smarter, not stronger. Persisting in the face of adversity; fighting with skill and will when pressed; avoiding and evading when practical; always alert; always finding a way; enjoying the sun; enjoying the dark. :carrot:
bunny-strong-50
— Bunny Strong!

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I was lucky when I was young. On a pay phone, yes its been that long, had someone come up from behind at the quickstop and put a .38 to my head. Give me all your money, he says, and immediately I’m thinking we would have to run to the bank, I have a change jar at home, all my money could take time. Instead my wallet and watch made him happy enough to run off. Since that time, closing in on around 35 years now, I am VERY aware of my surroundings in public places. I look around before I get out, park close to the gas pump so my door wont open all the way so nobody can jump in without going past me, ect. It was a life lesson that made me happy to have my life after it happened and has not been forgotten. Always better to give up what you have and live to fight another day.
Good topic, thanks Todd.

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I think that it’s more about your situational awareness, and always being armed. As well as not making yourself look like a victim.

But all of those transitional spaces are places I am in high alert for.

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Hmmm not what I expected. In & out meant some different to me. Hey I’ve been wrong before.

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I remember all the mistakes I made as a young teenager. Going into the neighborhood bodega (store in spanish) without being situationally aware of who was inside or what was going on. Those bodegas were always getting robbed or held up as we used to say back in the days. There were not any cell phones in those days so calling for help would have been hard. But every one of those bodegas had a pay phone in the vicinity. But even if you got to the pay phone and called 911 the cops would take at least 10 to 20 minutes to get on scene. The only plus I would say was there were cars parked all over the place so if shots were fired you could use them as cover. These types of situations and my career as an LEO made me more situationally aware when I enter any places of business. Unless I had no choice I will always try to get my errands done during daylight hours to avoid becoming a victim. I also understand that a criminal does not care what time it is but most violent crimes take place at night. My grandmother always said nothing good happens after midnight. My advice is to always carry, keep your head on a swivel, try to avoid distractions and unless there is an emergency or you do not have a choice try to run errands during daylight hours.

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If I’ve got the gas pump nozzle in my hand and point it at a potential aggressor I probably won’t need a gun. Those things will hose down a person in two seconds at ten yards. Rather than drawing a pistol I’d just unpocket a Bic.

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PS: Once it becomes a habit it doesn’t take much time or effort to glance around. If anything is out of place, seems unnatural or unusual one should already be prepared to maneuver accordingly. Someone eyeballing you? Eyeball then back so they know you see them.

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There have been a few occasions where I looked at an upcoming gas station or even pulled into one and then kept on driving to the next one because I saw or felt something wasn’t right.

When pulling into a parking lot I scan for sketchy people and vehicles and do my best not to park in spots next to someone sitting in their vehicle. I also try to scan for trouble when coming out of the store. That habit saved me from a likely serious incident on one occasion.

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Basically if you dont train to act automaticaly and even if you alre alert to what is around you,a person does not really know what they will do in any situation,there need to train your motor memory so you dont have to think,you do what ever is required to handle the problem!

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Do not forget de-escalation skills!

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of course,it will be up to the as to if they will walk away once they are lit op with the laser between the eyes,it is all up to them,because once i draw the deescalation is strictly up to them, sorry that was just the way i was trained overseas

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Did you see the video of a guy doing just what you said? He was pumping gas, van pulled up, bad guys jump out and announce the robbery. He pulls the hose from the tank and starts hosing ppl down and inside the van as well. It was funny as all get out.

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As I teenager, I was usually looking for trouble. I had situational awareness, but for all the wrong reasons.

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This subject is why I’m considering carrying concealed ASAP despite permit schemes. After taking a few classes I’ll begin my journey. Permits are an impossibility where I live but that won’t stop me unless I’m willing to become an easy victim. We need to consider the costs of being a victim like hospitalization costs (which we will fall solely on us) and worse, death of loved ones or ourselves. I didn’t practice situational awareness until about 5 years ago because I was so used to living abroad in an advanced East Asian country. I traveled to Japan often and it was like being in the USA 60 years ago or more. The same for South Korea. I never had a problem or close call in South Korea or Japan and I traveled alone unable to speak Japanese or Korean. A few years after reluctantly returning, I was at a gas station where two guys in a car at a gas pump about 100 feet away from me spotted me and then “kindly” asked me with a sly smile if I had a few dollars. I sensed something suspicious and foolishly handed one of the guys a $20 bill. I was still in a peaceful mindset like in most highly developed Asian countries, minding my own business and not even aware of my immediate surroundings. Living abroad for almost 15 years in a different culture that’s in contrast to one like the U.S. will do that. I’m totally the opposite now to the point of breaking certain illegal and unjust mandates or laws that hinder and even infringe on more important and necessary rights like bearing arms. We have to make difficult choices in life, but having to defend ourselves with force multipliers shouldn’t be one of them.

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I can understand the urge to not follow clearly unconstitutional laws. But with good defensive training and situational awareness you can significantly reduce the chance of needing a defensive weapon in the first place. Likely well bellow the chance of having your carrying be observed by an LEO during a routine traffic stop or accident etc. That could result in a permanent loss of rights or worse. I wouldn’t recommend violating laws in your circumstance but I would recommend not stating your consideration of doing so on an open forum.

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I understand your point and maybe you’re right about not announcing my intentions. But as for abiding by unjust and illegal laws/regulations/mandates that violate more important rights, I cannot subject myself to them. After I was denied a permit for no other reason other than not being part of the privileged few, I was involved in one major incident where I could have shot one or more threats about to do a home invasion. The fist sheriff showed up 14 minutes afterwards. Home invasions and serious crimes are not supposed to happen where I live, so thar incident was completely unexpected. I had two other incidents but none as serious as the first one, which all happened at home. But there’s nothing that can prevent incidents like that one from occurring outside of my home. One of the justices made that point during the NYSRPA v. Bruen court proceedings. More importantly, once you’ve experienced a threat where your life as well as your loved one’s life was at stake, you prepare as best as you can to prevent yourself and loved ones from becoming potential victims. There’s no turning back. It’s better to face a jury and still be alive than to face a hospital or morgue.

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Hopefully we will get some supreme court decisions soon that will force your State to recognize your right to self defense inside and outside your home!

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