Conceal carry and bullet proof vests

Was just courous, maybe this has been discussed in other chats I do not know. I was thinking of getting me a bullet proof vest. Like the safe life flexible ones often advertised on Facebook. Does anyone know what would or could happen if one was wearing one and God forbid, I had to use deadly force to defend myself? Would that instance be considered a felony? I’m mostly concerned about Michigan’s laws on this matter.

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I’m not an attorney, but I think if you were wearing body armor and you are not an LEO or someone else who would don such a thing as part of their normal duty gear, a prosecutor and a jury would probably have a hard time visualizing your situation as “self-defense.”

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Not sure of the specifics in Michigan. In some states it is against the law to wear body armor while committing a crime. So if your firearm use was determined to not be in self defense you could be facing extra penalties. But your pretty screwed in that situation with or without the vest.

As @Mr.Plastic points out a prosecutor might paint you in an unfavorable light for wearing one. I personally find this argument to be ridiculous though. A bullet proof vest is a purely defensive device. Why shouldn’t anyone who cares about their own safety be able to wear one if they are willing to put up with the discomfort? When they make one that is as comfortable as a Tshirt I’ll be first in line to pick up one for everyone in my family. At the moment the discomfort is not worth putting up with given the very slight chance I would ever need it.

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Thank you friend , I do see your point and I thank you for it. I’m thinking (also I am not an attorney) thinking it’s just protection if I did not resist the police federal, local or other wise. I do know wearing body armor in the commission of a crime is a federal level offense. Will ask around a lot more, before purchasing body armor. Thank you kindly.

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Thank you friend, thats my thoughts also. Wonder if there are legal professional persons who specifically know Michigan’s laws that I may contact for advice?

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Not sure if there are any lawyers from Michigan here on the forum?

Think USCCA has a list of lawyers in their network somewhere on this site? You might be able to pay for a consultation with one. There is also an ask a lawyer Topic here somewhere. The answers are above my membership level so I’m not familiar with how that works. Hopefully some of the more site savvy folks here can provide you with links.

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The simplest answer is this, no one on this forum can really offer appropriate legal advice because we’re not familiar with the specific city & county ordinances in your area and likely don’t practice law in your state. While we may share our opinions, it’s still up to you to do your own due diligence and seek out lawyers in your area who can provide a much more realistic answer.

If you’re just looking for “general terms” let me remind you that you will be judged by a jury of your peers. Don’t you think someone will ask, “was he gearing up and looking for a fight?” I have no clue who would be on your jury, but it’s always smart to consider that perspective before acting on it.

I don’t have any Punisher emblems on my firearms or gear because I consider how it might make me look by a jury of my peers. I don’t have antagonistic bumper stickers on my vehicles with slogans like “kill everyone and let god sort them out,” for the same reason. If I ever have to draw and use my firearm, I will be judged on my actions and not questioned on my motives.

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Agree with all your points. But it is a sad world where someone who decides they want to wear a bullet proof vest for protection is going to be accused of gearing up to go looking for trouble.

That’s like telling someone who is wearing a life preserver that they must be intending to sink their boat.

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I don’t disagree at all! Taking precautions shouldn’t indicate malicious intent but it does when guns are the topic.

I used to use a cross breed IWB holster until someone in my own extended family who leans far left and knows I carry saw my crossbreed holster belt clips and had the audacity to say, “So is that some statement having a Christian cross on your gun holster? Basically you’re saying if you pull your gun, you’re sending someone to their god?”

While I never considered that perspective before, a jury of my peers could certainly make the same connection and judge me based on THEIR perceived meaning of things I never considered or cared about. So I replaced the belt clips with blank ones and always remain vigilant and cognitive of how others might perceive me because I don’t want to give anyone ammunition to use against me. It’s unfortunate and unfair, but these are the steps I take for myself and my family to ensure my exposure is minimal and again, I’m judged on my actions and not motives.

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If its soft armor, I’d ask the prosecuter to wear a soft vest and see if he fear for his life or can run and hide after taking 1-3 shots in said soft vest…

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thank you, I do see what you are saying, but keep in mind, agnostic and atheist stickers tend to portray a non belief in God or a belief that God can’t be proven to actually exists, there fore no God equals no belief in a moral higher set of morals. But yes i see what you are saying. Here in my state the accused can and does set in on the jury selection.

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I’d like to wear soft armor because I hear of some many stray bullets killing people. I think I’d be more hesitant to pull a gun but I don’t know. Survival is what matters as well as not causing harm to innocent people.

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precisely, very well said, I do thank every one from my heart for all the good points.

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My soft body armor hangs on the bedroom door. Part of my plan and training is to don it as I pick up my weapons after hearing somebody try to break in. I can’t fathom any real legal “consequences” but I can imagine some idiot prosecutor trying to make the argument. My counter-argument would of course be safety and self-preservation (and a place to carry extra magazines, flashlight, pepper spray, and anything else that might be helpful. And it has big panels that say HOMEOWNER front and back (might give a second of pause to an adrenalin-charged responding officer).

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Maybe look up laws or articles on the law in your state as it pertains to body armor. States might differ. I’m not in MI, but I read that one state law goes — that since you are not committing a crime, it is legal to wear.

Who decides if you are committing a crime? You guessed it, the courts. For me, it was a “no brainer”, and crystal clear. I am not a criminal, I do not plan to be, if I ever have to use lethal force, it will be in self defense of my life, again, not committing a criminal act, so yes, I will wear it if and when I want with never a legal worry ever. Why?: I simply weighed it on a scale, on one hand, I do not wear the vest, get stabbed or shot and we all know the consequences to that injury; On the other I wear the vest, not get hurt, live, and take some low chance to zero chance of being found guilty of committing a crime while wearing a vest (low chance in my case).

To me, there is a population who I humbly guess the vest laws apply to, and I am not one of them, and that is for criminals, planning to commit a crime, and wear such a vest. Not only are they committing the crime they planned, but a second crime by wearing that vest.

Don’t trust me, check it out. Good luck. :hugs:

Yes, if you type in the topic search icon, it will provide some other similar topic strings with lots of comments:
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godchaser, I’m not entirely sure what you’re talking about seeing that I am an atheist who doesn’t believe in any religion or god figure. Sooooo, I couldn’t care less if you have atheist stickers on your car…my point was to show that aggressive bumper stickers or angry bumper stickers could be misconstrued when considering murder charges. I’m not suggesting that ALL bumper stickers like “I love my dog.” or “love to cook” would be met with the same skepticism.

As for your last comment about sitting in on jury selection…in my humble opinion, a person would be a fool to sit in on jury selection for their murder trial. There’s too many potential ways to screw up if you look at someone wrong, smile at the wrong time, look shifty, etc and that all can unfortunately influence the jurors. It’s not supposed to but it’s human nature.

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Hopefully this hold true about the purchase of body armor.

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Thank you very kindly, for the advice, I deeply appreciate it, as I like to stay inside the laws as much as humanly possible. I’m thinking of contacting a Lawyer (law professional) in my state to be on the “safe” side. Much appreciated thank you.

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Thank you, for the advise. I’m more curious about the possibility of wearing a vest in public and what may happen in the event that deadly force (heaven forbid) was necessary. What would the end result be from a legal perspective. Fortunately here in the state I live, we have what’s known as a castle law, and a stand your ground law. Both of which say when some one intrudes unwelcomedly into my home, I can consider that intrusion as an intent to commit great bodily harm up to and in lucluding death and deadly force to stop and or repell said intrusion is permissible. Not so in a public setting. There in lays my concern. The castle law does not apply only the stand your ground law will.

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Thank you very kindly

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