Body Armor Anyone?

I see there are older posts on this, but do any of you own body armor? I ordered some last night, will see how it wears. I tried on a steel plate one by the same company. Very nice, but thick, changed my seating position in the car.

So, I ordered the ceramic. Supposed to stop a .223 and most handguns…

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I have had mine for about a year now. Imagine that! After the Sourdough bread and not working for three months I have had to go on a diet so my gear will fit better. Take some time to train in it with shooting and maneuvering.

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Yes. Still fairly new, need to test it out on a longer car-drive. I like mine, as it’s one of those which the armor wraps around you more fully (front, sides, and rear/back), than just partially in the front.

Got lucky in that mine so far fits nicely. Mine is comfortable, but also got lucky with a Plain Jane no nonsense logo on it. The ones with advertisements or flashy logos on them turn me off. Mine’s in black. If I can save up - in a year or two, I’d like a white one. Kinda too rich for my blood, I’d love to afford for family members. Not sure if this would be accurate, but I noticed just before the Christmas holidays, at least one online store had a special and lowered their prices, temporarily.

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I do indeed. Only the level IV ( up to .300 win mag) hard plate so far. I haven’t had occasion to drive with it on, but it does travel with me. One more reason to love the adjustable stock- No need to re-zero.

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I really don’t care for body armor and the whole Tactical approach. If you have the money and think it is a good idea to cover part of your body with armor, then go for it. My reservation about the armor is that the limited area of protection will mean nothing if you get injured in your arms, legs, or shot in the face. I hope the force is with you in case of a knife attack in the back or a sucker punch to the face. It is true that any protection can and will be defeated if the perp wants what you have. I much rather train and try to avoid any shady areas if possible.
One question I would like to ask, if you are shot while wearing body armor, will you be able to recover from the shot or blow fast enough to protect yourself? How do you train to achieve the maximum good from your body armor?
I could go on, but I think I have made my point, body armor does not make you invincible.

Larry

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Why are you going anywhere where you think body armor would be necessary? A lot cheaper and lighter to just take another route or go elsewhere.

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Perhaps, when I have grandkids in school, I’ll get the backpack version for them.

I just can’t justify buying one for myself considering my routine and lifestyle.

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State of new york tried passing legislation to ban purchase or possession of armor, including the backpacks, leaving the students vulnerable. Leave it to the leftists to attempt to ban the most basic, passive form of self defense.

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I agree, and do that when I am out and about normally. I do have reasons not to (that are not nefarious :grinning:) that I might talk about sometime.

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I get the points where in some areas, a “vest” is less likely needed. But I also calculated that there might be some times and places where there is some higher chance of being shot, God-forbid. And, I’m referring to a law abiding, gainfully employed person. What would motivate me to such a purchase, and wear it; There are some times I choose not to. I think fear can be a motivator, but fear of what.

For me, I already started out living and working in a highly populated, and high violent crime-rate region. So, I carried some level of fear before the turmoil and crises of 2020; then it became two-fold, fear of crime, and fear of being mistaken for a criminal and imagining what if an otherwise good-person/officer mistook me? IDK. Living in fear had “always” been a way of life, as was living defending myself. In a way, it helped me.

For me, 2020 was the ‘Straw that broke the camel’s back’, so I finally bought one. Lots of family here. I did go back to school, hoping to relocate, but until then, I carry-on.

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I think a lot of people might say the same thing about carrying a firearm.

If I had the the extra cash I would get a set for everyone in my family. Not that I would ever expect them or myself to use it. But as the saying goes - It is better to have it and not need it than the other way around.

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I’ve just got a 3a vest (handgun to .44mag) vest, and same material plates for my tactical vest. Unobtrusive and pretty light, I just have them for the potential shtf situations, and weighed in agility issues along with protection as my parameters. Part of me would like to get my sons full body armor package, including helmet, NVO (night vision optics)etc…and the realistic side of me says “bro, you’re hitting 62, your knees are toast, your Rambo days are history :roll_eyes:” so the soft sided 3A it is. NVO is pretty sweet though, tried my sons kit out this week and the real deal, not the digital stuff, is just amazing.

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Mine is never far off. If you have it, train with it!! The way things are going, large scale violent encounters are becoming more and more possible. I prefer light and fast but options are always a benefit. While on the topic of body armor, let me ask another question:
How many firearm carriers have completed a medical course like TCCC? To me, being able to potentially save a life is more important that being able to end one.

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The best care under fire is returned fire! - Every First Sergeant ever.
I keep my CPR cert valid. Aside from that the Combat Lifesaver class prior to deployment & my 1st aid merit badge from Boy Scouts all those years ago. Most of the techniques haven’t changed but I know I’m out of practice. I do have a full trauma kit on my plate carrier. Same principle as the body armor & firearms- rather have & not need than need & not have.

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Larry,
center mass is where people aim. Why?
Protecting the heart and lungs turns a center mass shot into something more ‘survivable’. Body armor is designed to do just that. And yes, there are many anecdotal stories from the sandbox of soldiers and Marines staying in the fight after having a round stopped by body armor.
Body armor isn’t worn to make you invincible. It’s worn to make an otherwise fatal gun shot survivable.
I wear soft armor when I instruct on the range–and it’s not the beginners that I am concerned about (for the most part, they listen). It’s the guys who have shot “for a long time” and have absolutely terrible habits and zero muzzle control. I can’t think of a more likely place to get shot, with the possible exception of Chicago…

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Yes. It takes a bit to adjust to while driving. But I’m managing.
image

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OUCH!!! such a hurtful shot at my hometown. @Aaron25

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Several or more years ago, I was in Chicago, the taxi driver was from Afghanistan. He stated that Chicago was more dangerous than where he lived and worked as an interpreter for the US military.

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Some places huh Aaron. Glad you said it first, and not me. I’ve occasion to wear it in “the range”; One member here taught me. Guess most are not in the perfect storm “of such a need”’; I get it. Regrettably, I’m not in that majority, at least for now. I like the value of stab resistance, which mine offers. Still, summer day-time is when I can less likely use it due to the heat, outside of that, I need to think of using it more. : - )

Aaron’s cool Lu-Can my good brother, he just using the “Broad Shoulders” as an example of how it can be practical. :smiling_face_with_three_hearts:

Peace.

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@Burdo , I know @Aaron25 is good peoples. I was just attempting to make a joke. Not here to upset anyone nor do I have feelings ( Infantry all the way ). :joy:.

Guess I have to go get a book on how to say jokes. :joy: :v:t4: & :heart: to everyone.

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