Body Armor Anyone?

@Dave17 , I know first hand what you are saying, after all I lived there all but 9 years of my life and I am just 59

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Yes, we all lighthearted here with you. — Luv

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Aaron25, your view is well taken, but I still view armor as a want, not a need for the everyday joe.
I spent the bulk of my life in the Los Angles area. I can tell you that having your head mounted on a swivel is better than anybody’s armor, add to that some training and you can survive OK.
I understand that the center mass is the target, but we are talking about people that want to take advantage of a situation not a day at the range. These people that want to do harm have one aim, get in, get close, take want you want, and get the hell out.
The point here is that a perp will target the victim and decide if a weak area can be utilized to carry out the crime. When you are looking down the barrel of a gun, all of the body armor in the world is not worth a damn. I am speaking from experience, I can tell you that the barrel of a .38 pistol in your face will not make you feel great because you have body armor, just hand over the wallet.
The body armor has its place, Police, Military, and so forth, the everyday citizen may not need the “comfort” of armor.
I respect your opinion and if it works for you then, by all means, wear it.
I will ask one more question of you: Have you ever needed the body armor to fend off a bullet while working as an instructor or civilian?

Larry

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Let me play devil’s advocate with you. Would not a person be in a more advantageous setting if they had their head on a swivel, and some body armor?

Body armor does not protect you from all things. Armor has historically been beaten by a sharper sword or better arrow. It is an option, a tool in the tool box so to speak.

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I know a few people alive today thanks to armor.

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True, I need as much protection as I can have, my point, based upon a few past comments is that just adding body armor is not enough. Training, situational awareness, in my opinion, is the basic bedrock of self-protection.
As you say the armor can and will be useless against a better arrow, sharper spear, and so forth.

Larry

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Fred_G,
I own - and use - body armor. As a long-time instructor of our Range’s NSSF First Shots class I was worn down by the constant procession of being covered by the errant muzzles of confused students with their fingers on the trigger of the first firearm they ever handled. Don’t get me wrong here - First Shots is a great program and I really do enjoy teaching it. But hey - safety first! I got a great deal through USCCA with Integral Armor. One final word…it does take some time to get used to, but well worth the effort IMHO.

Larry

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CPR is all over the place. I got first aid/cpr certified annually, initially as a lifeguard/swim instructor, later work related, and last couple classes were AED (defibrillator) oriented exclusively. Latest manual technique I’m aware of is 30 compressions (to the BeeGees “stayin’ alive”) to two breaths, and prior to that was iirc, roughly a 50/50 mix of compression/breathing, or 2 on 1, one breathing, one doing compression. First AED class, turns out our shops unit was expired :roll_eyes:, and several months later I caught grief for mentioning that it had still not been tested…so un-volunteered myself from the “team.”

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Mine came in today! :grinning:

Heavy, bulky, and hot. Defiantly will have to practice drawing the gun with it on. Plus side, no cover garment. :crazy_face:

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Lu-Can–I’m originally from just south of Green Bay (60s, 70’s and early 80s).
Back when it was a rivalry.
Then I moved to MIlwaukee and watched those Cubs destroy the Brewers regularly.
All was said in fun–my rels are from there, and I like to visit. Worked there weekly for years.
But big picture—WAY too blue for me to live there! Gotta change out the leadership…

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#Aaron25. I was just joking my brother, and thank you. I am not the kind of person which wear their feelings on their sleeve.

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I know–it’s all good. I appreciate you reaching out–I didn’t think my original comment would be taken too seriously. :slight_smile:

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I’m not wearing it when I teach for active ‘threats’–I’m wearing it the same way I wear a helmet on a bike or a seat belt–to prevent injury due to accident or negligence.

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Level 3A Full Wrap Soft Armor every time I leave the house (I am a civilian, not LE), the day after purchasing my first Pistol and beginning my journey, purchased Soft Body Armor.
I have NEVER been in a fist fight and expected that I would not get hit (indeed, have taken multiple punches/kicks every time). Since Day 1 of my Armed Lifestyle I have NEVER assumed that should the day come I must Draw and Fight with my Firearms, I would not be shot. This logic in place, it seems a no brainer to wrap your vital areas in some sort of Bullet Resistant material. Though, Plates in a Carrier are left for Training/Fighting Day.
Just like the Pistols on my person, with the Armor - better to be wearing it and not need it than to Leak from a Vital Organ.
Thankfully, because of choosing a responsibly armed lifestyle, all old habits and practices change and I have neither been in a fistfight nor a gunfight in 30 years. Being kind, thinking before acting and not going “stupid places with stupid people doing stupid things” goes a LONG way in mitigating the chances of needing firearms or armor. However, understanding that Evil exists in the world and can strike at any time without a moments notice, Firearms and Armor are prudent choices, all the time, everywhere.

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What company did you get it from? Trying to make up my mind. Thank you.

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I am curious about the soft armor as well. @MichiganGlock I assume you wear it under a shirt?

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Is there any legit/effective head protection that doesn’t make you look like Jason?

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Yes, body armor should be owned by everyday citizens. Just be wary of the snakeoil products out there.

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Several different makers out there. One of the many reasons I chose “Safelife”, was that their logo on the vest was subtle, low key; As flamboyant insignias turn me off. I wear a t-shirt underneath, and then over it, I wear a button or zippered shirt or light-weight sweater, so as to be able to open it for air circulation/breathability. Like wearing my softie wrap-around version at the range too, for a lil bit more safety in case of “accident” there.

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