Carry Accessories for Travel on a Bike | Concealed Carry | USCCA

As I write this, it is snowing in Wisconsin, and my motorcycle is in the shop getting tuned up for next season. I’m new to riding, having just gotten my motorcycle license last summer, but I have put on a few thousand miles already. And I’m looking forward to getting back on the bike as soon as the weather turns nice!


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/blog/carry-accessories-for-the-traveling-biker/
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I have a similar thigh bag I have used but what I use the most is a shoulder rig. Between my vest and my jacket I don’t have to worry about printing.

One of my vests is also made for concealed carry with pockets (one on each side for left or right handed draw) designed for that purpose.

Oh and @Dawn Mary and I have already been out riding this year.

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I was out for a little bit yesterday! But we had other things going on so I only got about 30 min in. :frowning:

Nope! Motorcycle travel. :slight_smile: But this would work for bicycle too.

The chances of riding your bike and at the same time needing to shoot a bag guy are slim to none, and none just took the bus (as they say). I keep mine in a small firearm bag in the tankbag or tailpack/trunk. Elite Survival Systems Liberty Gun Pack.

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I have carried on a bike all over the west. I had a kidney tool kit modified to hold a Charter Arms Bulldog 44sp with the hammer cut down, front sight removed and a one inch barrel. I also had Pachmyer grips.
In 20 years I only needed it once. I was crossing the desert in June midday and was feeling dizzy from the heat. I saw a tree on top of a little knoll and pulled over to wet my bandana and have some water from my saddlebags. I parked my bike off the road and climbed under the tree. Fortunately I took my gun but mainly was worried about snakes. About five minutes later a van with three 1%ers, pulled up opened the back of the van and were loading my bike. I yelled stop and they said f-off. I drew down on them and they dropped the bike and left.
Cell phones did not work out of town then, so I rode into town and called the CHP which was a waste of time.
Fortunately I had my weapon on me and loaded or I might have lost my bike or my life. Two lessons I learned. One when you are vulnerable, like being alone, don’t act the part of a victim. The second is a gun unloaded, in storage is worthless.
I will have to say the safest I have felt in 50 years of riding, is at true biker events. If you show respect, you will get respect. Go the other route you are in trouble.

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