Can you "Openly" Conceal Carry?

I sometimes use a “Sneaky Pete” holster. These are holsters that attempt to conceal the fact that you carry a firearm. My pictures below are of my “Medical” holster they offer. There are several other categories available using their website. Sneaky Pete Covert Holsters
Just curious if your state would legally permit you to use this method. Especially in states where conceal carry is permitted, but open carry is not. Basically, what defines “open” carry?
In Texas with a LTC I can open carry legally. So the question is mute here.
I did state in a recent post that if people ask to see the contents I reply “that would break the airtight seal” to end the conversation.


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That’s creative :thinking:! If you were a random stranger out and about I would have figured it was medical equipment for yourself like an epi pen or diabetes equipment :thinking:.

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Items like a Sneaky Pete (SP) only remain effective until the originator tries to turn a commercial profit. Especially the size you have pictured. Hard to say where trouble will come from first - LE that doesn’t get the 4th or an observant troublemaker who selectively reads and remembers the Constitution, is aware that SPs exist, and calls LE for some fun at your expense.

I have been considering the same question. I have a variant of an SP that I got for my RM380; however, the dimensions are just a tad too tight. It was intended for a Taurus micro 380. The smaller, non-descript pouch is much closer to cell phone size and, from my perspective, less likely to attract unwanted attention. I am currently looking for a purpose built large cell phone case of similar construction that can be safely repurposed. Easier to do with the RM380 as it is DAO with a heavy trigger pull.

I think an interesting experiment and potential countermeasure to the SP being recognized is to wear it with contents matching the label. That may be a low risk method to gage local interpretation of “openly concealed carry.”

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I live in Texas. Strangely, since this holster has a retention clip, I could cut the flap off and legally carry in most places.
I am more wondering how this legally works in other states that allow conceal carry but do not allow open carry.

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And for the $65+, I am sure they make a profit. :rofl:

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I had one when I was heavier and carrying a Glock 26. Work fantastic and aren’t as big as you’d think they are. Also people have their heads so far in the clouds they don’t even notice.

I highly recommend practicing drawing cause moving the flap out of the way is a little different

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@Sheepdog556 Which model did you have?

  • Gray “Power Pack”
  • Blue “Medical”
  • Green “Outdoor Gear”
  • Red "Fire Dept.

SP Covert Holsters

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Mine was just a plain black nylon covered one

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Got one years ago (leather); use it a good bit. Have never had an issue yet. As noted most people will never notice it- one friend did, asked what it was, told him my PDA (Personal Defense Assistant😊) and that satisfied his curiosity😏

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As long as the flap doesn’t open, revealing your weapon, you are concealed carry.

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I’ve seen similar items for cars, like a first aid kit that goes under the seat. I almost bought one, but my concern is that one of my kids will figure out that’s where daddy hides his gun. I’d rather have it on me or locked. Of less likely concern is that someone might actually need a first aid kit and find my pistol. Not likely to occur, but maybe something to consider if your going to carry a fake med kit. How will you respond when someone asks you for help?

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@Ouade5 I would probably say… “Lo siento pero no hablo inglés.” Then I would call 911.

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I am not sure the 4A applies, since this product is advertised publicly for what it is.

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I am thinking along the lines of treating the SP like any other handbag, wallet, purse, or belt pouch/bag (I.e. persons, papers, and effects) - LE can’t just make you open the item and display the contents without a warrant or a defensible reason such as inside or entering a public venue where weapons are prohibited (or absence of weapons is a freely agreed condition of entry) like a sports arena or a a courthouse. When walking down the street from the train/bus stop to my home or vehicle, I think the Fourth applies. Otherwise, we are headed down the road of “stop and frisk.”

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So, a caveat: I’m not an expert, and I didn’t even stay at a Holiday Inn. However, in my state, as long as it is concealed, it is legal. I see this no different than a purse or tactical bag. All of that said, the Sneaky Pete doesn’t look comfortable. Is it?

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@Paul1 It is comfortable to me. But I am sure that is dependent on a person’s body shape. Standing, walking, and sitting are fine. I have to remove it to wear a seat belt in a car. I purchased the model with two metal belt clips so it is easily removed. They also offer all the models in belt loops. That would not be very convenient for me though.

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Come on @MikeBKY… I see you are trolling now. How about a legal perspective here? Lol.

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I was doing my legal due diligence (and I took a shower) before I responded.

The law in Kentucky is pretty simple. “The concealment must be such as to prevent persons from seeing the weapon whose vision is not obscured by the carrier’s person or by anything other than the covering used to conceal it.” DELK v. COMMONWEALTH , 344 S.W.2d 832, 833 (Ky. 1961). A link to the case is below and is a short read and has been cited positively as recently as 2018.

In Kentucky, a deadly weapon in a Sneaky Pete holster would absolutely be considered concealed.

https://casetext.com/case/delk-v-commonwealth-1

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@MikeBKY So since the “victim” received what would have been a previously fatal blow to his head, the “unknown” shooter just shot a guy that was going to die anyway?

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@MikeBKY Maybe short for an Attorney. :rofl:

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