Ammo storage

Almost all the ammo I buy comes in 50 round boxes of various sizes with a little plastic tray. I assume a lot of you folks out there do the same. When storing them in an ammo can, do you leave them in the box or dump them out into the can loose? I s there any particular pro or con for either way?

Thanks in advance for any info!

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Leave them in the box. Write the date of purchase on the box to facilitate a good “first in - first out” use scheme. Don’t throw away all of the empties - especially the cartridge trays. They are handy when rotating your defense rounds or performing visual inspections. Also easier to carry a couple of boxes to the range than a 1,000 round can.

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Both.

Leaving them in the box
Pros:
No confusion over what the ammo is
Easy to count
Less heavy ammo cans
Easy to grab a box or three and throw it in a range bag exactly how it is

Cons:
Can’t fit nearly as much in each can
Generates nuisance garbage whenever you use some instead of just all at once

Emptying into ammo cans
Pros:
More space efficient
No trash when you get ammo out

Cons:
Hard to know how much you have
Has to be homogeneous to not mix
Really wasteful when you have a small amount left in a can

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There you go. Pretty good information, and the same I’d give. The way the ammo is stored at your local gun shop, do the same at home and LOCK IT UP!, if not in use.

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leave it in the box. If there is a recall you’ll have the lot numbers.

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Centerfire cartridges - doesn’t matter. I do whatever is easier and usually I store between 2,000 and 3,000 in original 50rds boxes.
Whenever I’m heading to the Range I throw loose 500 rds to small cartoon box which fits my range bag.

Rimfire cartridges - I keep them hanging in original plastic box (CCI). Loose rimfire can go bad if stored wrongly. The primer compound, located inside the rim, may sometimes go loose and makes ammo dead. With good quality ammo it shouldn’t happen… but why risk?

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When storing my ammo, I use flip-top ammo boxes. They come in different sizes for different calibers. I have mine color-coded for the different calibers and it is quick to grab a few boxes when going to the range, instead of taking multiple ammo cans. I usually order them from Amazon, if my local store does not have them in stock.

Here is a link to some:

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Larry summed it up well and the above is one of the most practical on the list.

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Thanks for the info! The pros and cons listed make a lot if sense. Calvin, I actually have a half dozen or so of those MTM boxes. I got them after some ammo I purchased came in 500 round bags. I use them for transporting small quantities to the range.

Looks like I need to get a couple more ammo cans! I have more ammo delivering tomorrow and my existing few cans are nearly full. Plus, I like to separate by brand, grain, fps, etc. I do put some desiccant packs in every can.

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What I do. Simple and easy.

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Thanks!

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.22 ammo I dump in a sealed .30 cal metal ammo box. I put some silica packs in to keep the moisture absorbed just in case. Other ammo, if I’m going to use it within 5 months or so, I keep it in the box. If I have excess or ammo I use 1x/year, I get rid of the box and dump it in whatever metal sealed ammo container I have on hand, again with silica packs (the metal ones you can recharge (remove moisture) by baking in the oven for a while). I don’t like keeping cartridges in cardboard, as cardboard can contain/maintain a certain amount of moisture depending on the humidity, etc when you store it, and any time I’ve had shells corrode over time they’ve been in cardboard (even when sealed away). That’s just my experience; if I lived in the desert, I’d probably keep the cardboard.

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I just returned three boxes of Liberty Civil Defense that was recalled.

The recall applied to ammo sold during a certain period and with specific lot numbers. Those numbers were printed on the box. The manufacturer required photos of the box flaps with those numbers to process the recall.

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I leave them in the box & put them in the can. The oldest are always at the bottom. I have four plastic ammo containers that hold 100 rounds each ( two for 9mm & two for 45acp). I will fill them up with the oldest rounds before going to the range after loading as many Mags as I am going to take. Any rounds left in the plastic containers after the range are moved the the forward most slots so I know to use them first on my next range day. I have one 380 & one 22 so I just put a factory box of 50 rounds each in my bag. That seems to work well for me.

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I’m with @Calvin_USCCA all the way. My MTM containers are color coded by caliber and the type of ammo. eg: “Orange for defensive loads”, “Blue for ball ammo”, etc. this also gives me the opportunity to inspect the ammo for any imperfections! Or stored in color coded magazines then rotated after every range session! In addition, just in case there’s a problem or a severe malfunction with the ammo, I log the date and the LOT # in my shooting journals.


Not a single round goes unaccounted for!

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Doesn’t matter, I do both.
Make sure your ammo can has a rubber seal.

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In the manufactures boxes for me. I have ammo containers for different calibers and then put them in different containers for target or SD.

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How you keep your ammo can(s) matter as well.
On a cement, brick or tile floor, I’ll put it on scrap 2x4s–it prevents the bottom of the ammo can from rusting.
Smaller ammo cans, like 7.62, can be secured in the drawers of a locking filing cabinet (these can be picked up cheap at a Habitat for Humanity ReStore)

Friends in New Orleans observed that during prolonged flooding, plastic ammo cans eventually leaked while steel cans with good gaskets remained dry. Something maybe to consider if you’re located on a flood plane

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For long term storage ( from 2 years to 20 years ) I keep the ammo in the original box. I warm the oven up to 200deg. and shut it off, I let the elements cool for a few minutes and place the boxes of ammo on the racks and close the oven door and wait 15 minutes then vacuum seal as many I can fit in a bag either quart or gallon size. This insures no moisture is left in the boxes.
All others are left in the box and stored in ammo cans with desiccants and stored on shelves.
And no I have never overheated a round.

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