...A KNOCK ON THE HOTEL ROOM DOOR (Situational awareness: Has it happened to you!?!?!)

It’s amazing the amount of seemingly mundane, day-to-day activities that take on a whole new perspective when you have been trained to be situationally aware and to avoid conflict… For instance, the following story recently came to my attention from a friend. She shared a situation in which she was startled by a knock on her door. Here’s the story:

Tonight […] I hear a knock on the hotel room door.
A million thoughts run through my head.
I check the security peephole.
Young female.
I ask how I can help her through the closed door.
She says they were partying on their balcony right above mine and her ID fell on my balcony.
If she could just grab it?
In my mind I’m like OH HELL NO, but I calmly tell her I’ll go check and to stay put.
I check the balcony.
Sure enough, ID card is there.
I go back to the still closed door, ask her what the name is on the ID and after she verifies, I slid it under the door.
BEFORE [USCCA], I probably would’ve let her in to grab it, making myself an easy target/ victim, even if she was just “scoping” things out.
But you can never be careful enough.
I’m so grateful for everything I’ve learned […] so far!

How many of YOU have an experience that shows YOU were thinking ahead and making wise choices based on your USCCA training? (Not just related to staying in hotels or answering doors, of course!) I’d love to hear it!

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I use the Ring doorbell camera to know who’s behind the door whereas before, I entertain just about everyone behind a metal security door.

Now, if they look like selling something, I won’t even bother to answer.
If they appear to have a legitimate reason (a concerned citizen possibly meaning to tell me I left my vehicle door open, etc.), I’ll talk.
If I end up approaching the door, I’m armed.

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As someone who has stayed at many hotels/motels, scary part is some look good on the internet, but turn out to be pretty seedy when I have gotten there. Although a major inconvenience at times, I have always carried where my permit allows and had it ready at the hotel. Would I let someone in? Only If I know who it is.

I have discovered this though, you get what you pay for. Pay $200 per night or more, probably safer than the $100 per night Hotel.

Where I have changed is situational awareness while traveling (and out around home), avoiding areas where it just doesn’t look right. Activity at home too, I avoid standing directly in front of the door by using a video doorbell, or standing to the side of a door not directly in front.

BTW, you did the right thing with the card, they may have dropped it purposely.

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I think situational awareness is one of those things you don’t notice until you are not aware and something unexpected happens. I vaguely remembered crossing the street to avoid a situation but thanks to you and USCCA I am aware enough to avoid potentially dangerous situations.

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This!!! :slight_smile:

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When I was much younger and much more bullet proof, I Worked at a mine in Texas, my partner was a big, body builder type 6-5 350 or so. One morning he tells me someone BANGED on his door very late at night. He looked out the peep hole and didn’t know who it was so he called Hotel Security and the Security guys called the cops. I asked him why he didn’t just step out there and tell them to leave, his answer, "Nobody wants to fight with the big m.f., they just shoot him… That was a real learning experience for me, good sense wins out over testosterone.

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With my job I’ve laid over in hotels, and once had a late knock at the door while asleep. I just called the front desk, and they took care of whatever the situation was. At home, I live in a nice neighborhood. We look out for each other, and report anything out of the ordinary to police, sort of a neighborhood watch.

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Well played! Training to save lives is not a “concept”, it’s what the USCCA does best.

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