50 Rounds Just Isn't Enough

Went to the range for the first time in a month and had two important takeaways…

  1. 50 rounds are just not enough to get some real practice in……(I’m rationing for now)

  2. I need to start dryfire practicing at home (my draw was horrific)……

Third takeaway (not necessarily important) is, I really, really miss shooting…

Ok, time to go create a training schedule.

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Good for you for rationing. I need to stop packing 2-3 extra boxes just in case, because in the end, I keep using them.

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Nope, no where close to enough.
You’d feel much better about it if you reloaded.
Get yourself a new toy, a Hornady Lock N Load Press.

Shoot, go back home, sit at the reloading table with an Audible Book, good times!

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Dry fire is crucial, not just a good idea. Crucial to getting better.

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James, glad you had some range time!!!...I agree with Fiz…and good that you are rationing! Jerzy, here, might have one the dry fire award at 20,000 rounds. Dry fire, drawing, even video yourself. I make mistakes and get sloppy, and when I replay the video…??? I get real hard on myself. We are going to start to reload, FIZ, but I like to listen to old rock, especially when I weld. LOL!

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I’m going to the range for the first time in over a month. I’m taking 4 pistols, 2 rifles, and 200 rounds for each.

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My indoor range doesn’t allow for drawing your pistol nor rapid firing as it can be dangerous. I assume and hope you practice quick draw with the pistol unloaded. Also, depending on the weapon, dry firing too much can damage the striker pin. :wink:

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Hey @Simjack, I don’t know that I’d call it “quick draw” (I hover between 1.96 -2.2 seconds), but we do allow draw from holsters at my range (outdoor) under certain circumstances (safety requirements met etc)….but yes any practice I do at home will be unloaded…(good reminder though to separate the ammo from the practice session). :+1:

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I just got the sightmark dry fire practice system and like it pretty well. Gives you a snap cap laser and free app that records your hits on the target. Some in app purchase let you do even more if you choose to.

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I don’t know that there are any modern centerfire pistols where this is a concern. Rimfire, yes.

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This is one of my favorite wives tails (or gun tails if you prefer) that has been with us since the turn of the century.

Allow me to expound upon some history of this tale. When center fired cartridges became a “thing” (thank you Dr. Berdan) most pistols and shotguns had “Strykers” welded to the flat of the hammer and penetrated the frame through a hole. That whole mass and velocity thing took over when there was no primer to hit and soften the blow of the hammer. Eventually with enough strikes on an empty gun the “stryker” would literally break off. So the legend was born that dry firing a gun would break the firing pin. .22’s for many years had a similar firing pin system in the bolt and dry firing could also cause issues with the firing pin getting stuck and breaking. If you look at just about any gun (pistol/shotgun) on the market from say around 1940 or so on all of them have a return firing pin spring and the hammer is flat so that it can hit the a’fore mentioned beastie which flies in and springs back out, the hammer is a separate entity. Bolt guns are a little different in that they fly forward to a mechanical stop and are designed not to impact the inside of the bolt face from within. 22’s had a similar modification in that the business end of the firing pin was tapered and there was usually a “tab” to limit forward momentum as well as a spring (sometimes). Cowboys, Gunslingers and Sergeants have perpetuated this tail for more than 100 years. :sunglasses:

Don’t get me started on how cleaning your weapon after shooting got started. :crazy_face:

Cheers,

Craig6

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I believe that was one of the original commandments that Moses came down from the mount with wasn’t it? I’m pretty confident it’s a Biblical law… :wink:

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Is this why when you drop a handgun it won’t discharge as well? Good educational Craig. :slight_smile:

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Sully,i whole heartily agree with you on that,as the saying goes if you dont use it,you lose it

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Checkout ChrisSajnog.com amazing dry fire and much more!

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I like to take a 100 rounds to the range once a week to keep in practice with my pistol.

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Do you reload to shoot or shoot to reload? I do both. I have been averaging about 200 rounds per day at the loading bench and still have plenty of components for the various calibers I hand load, with the exception of empty brass. Hopefully, the ranges in Virginia will be open soon because Governor Black Face lost the case involving Safeside indoor range in Lynchburg and I can get to the range and replenish my fired brass supply.

I personally use a Redding T7 turret press. I also have a fair amount of Hornady equipment and, from what I have read and heard, the Lock N Load system is a very good one.

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I went out yesterday to the outdoor range and because I’m so used to shooting indoors where we can’t draw, I forgot my holster! I went through 5-600 rounds of 9 and 5.56.

MUST DRY FIRE at home…

Maybe I should ask for a reloading set for my birthday?

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I had joined a club this past January; outdoor, indoor ranges and was getting in a groove of going twice a week, am retired and early morning was a great time to go, now, closed until ? I have 3 pistols, revolvers and was really enjoying and learning. Hoping before year end.
Yes, 50 rounds not enough .

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I haven’t been to the range since all this virus attacked and I sure miss it. Trying keep up with dry fire, attention to grip and draw practice, Better than no1thing,