Dry fire

How many regularly dry fire? Be honest.

The last year or so has been sporadic for me. For six months or so before that I practiced 15 minutes a day almost daily, mostly draw stroke, grip, presentation on a small silhouette target, sight picture, trigger control, then got out of the habit.

After mounting a red dot I resumed to learn to instinctively put the dot on target but that has been fairly random.

Every evening I think, “Tomorrow I’ll dry fire,” but often I don’t and it shows when I get to the range.

I’d rather hear bang than click.

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Everything depends… what actions / manipulations do we call “dry fire”.

In my case, dry fire is anything that I’m doing with my handgun.

  • everyday I’m holding handgun in my hands and work on trigger press and proactive reloads, sitting and watching TV or listening the music. 10 - 15 minutes.
  • drawing from holster - 2, 3 days per week for 10 minutes
  • drawing + shooting while moving + emergency reloads - once per week for 10 minutes

Additionally I’m on the Range doing all above once per week.
Dry fire is a part of my life. It’s a habit. The same habit as breakfast every morning.

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I spend a couple hours at 3 times a week practicing holster drawing, presentation, correct firm two hand gripping (dry?) firing at a target, (actually shooting a BB Air Pistol 1911).

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Bought the Strkeman laser thing. Played with it for an hour or so, a year ago. Haven’t since. Now that winter is here the Mrs and I do date night to the range every other Friday. 50 rounds each. I like the dot challenge.

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I rarely do dry fire practice. Re-racking to reset the trigger kills it for me. I’ve been waiting on a dryfire mag for G43, but don’t think it’s coming anytime soon.

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Yup, same here. Even though I only need to re-rack maybe a quarter inch to reset the striker it’s still seems like a bigger hassle than it really is.

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I use a Sirt training gun. I practice every day. I do weak hand, strong hand, both, drawing, point shooting. I even practice with the cats but they get bored really quick!

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I think of it as practice in acquiring or reacquiring a sight picture. It’s not fully realistic because you need to rebuild your grip each time. But quickly acquiring the target and assembling a good grip are both useful sub-tasks to groove in while waiting for a good multi-shot solution to be invented.

When I’m being a good boy I try to dry fire most days. This time of year I fall behind because my shooting gallery relies on natural light and the days are ending too early — or I’m quitting too late. I’ll still hit 3 days or better — a selection of exercises with MantisX and some time with a laser cartridge at various distances and target sizes. I don’t stare at a wall and go click, or balance pennies.

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I’ve tried a couple of firearms designed for laser training. None of them feel close to my EDC in term of grip, trigger break, etc. not to mention acquiring target through the sights.

I’d rather practice less, but have my hand, fingers, eyes know where they belong on my EDC and what to do when needed.

I’ve been lucky so far and have been able to use my EDC at least 2-3 times a month. And it’s not just plinking at targets, but participating in exercises and threat focused scenarios which involve drawing from concealment, various target placement, low and no light, movement, etc.

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I try to dry fire train at least twice a week. I will be honest though, I don’t always hit that goal and I say “tomorrow I will” a lot as well.

I do think that dry fire can be just as effective as going to the range. No, you don’t get the “bang” but you can hammer into your muscle memory everything you do. I have found that dry fire training helps me keep from flinching. I get so used to shooting without recoil, it trains my body to not anticipate anything. I even do dry fire while at the live range.

I started using the ELMS laser system and I love it. SIRT pistols are very nice and effective, but I just personally prefer using my exact firearm.

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I frequently hold the trigger back while re-racking during dry fire sessions. It verifies the disconnector function as well as providing trigger reset training for quicker follow up shots.

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Why not do your dry fire practice with your EDC firearm? Use your regular grip, trigger, sights, etc to stay tuned up when you can’t hit the range or afford 100 shots daily.
Pink Rhino laser cartridge
There are a few things you can’t realistically practice without the actual operation of the gun in live fire. But there’s an awful lot you can accomplish in dry fire — especially with feedback from a target.

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The re-racking of the slide just doesn’t make the dry fire exercise realistic for me. I think a real life scenario with only one shot and no follow-up will be very slim.

I understand the benefits and advantages of dry fire exercises. I’m not trying to convince anyone to do it or not do it.

All I’m saying is it’s just not for me.

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My muscle memory involved with keeping finger off the trigger when racking the slide does not have a special setting for “dry fire practice only”. :wink:

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I’m wondering why you guys need to rack the slide for dry firing? There is no reason to hear CLICK. Just practice and press dead trigger.

As @PDA3 posted:

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Same like @Jerzy.

Just make sure to remember rule #1, so you won’t be Alec Baldwin.

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It’s to feel the trigger break, not hear it. Maintaining sight alignment when the trigger breaks is a big part of the dry fire equation.

If you prefer a squishy trigger that’s up to you.

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You press the trigger to make a projectile go out from the barrel.
You dry firing without the live ammo… so there won’t be any projectile that will go out the barrel.

Dry fire can be divided into few portions:

  • trigger control (you just keep the handgun in your hand and work on trigger to feel it)
  • draw stroke (this can be done without resetted trigger)
  • follow through (you can still press dead trigger)

Actually most of dry firing drills can be done without CLICK.
If you don’t know your trigger… work on it first. Once you know the trigger you don’t need to feel the break practicing other stuff.

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The other problem with that is that it induces a bad habit. If you’re always re-racking the slide you might to that out of habit when SHTF.

I prefer a good DA/SA like my P226 for dry fire instead of a striker fired pistol.

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I am the same way. I have found myself dry-firing less in the past few months. I currently use the G-Sight Laser Training System along with their app. I still go through a few reps of drawing and presenting from concealment every day, once I put my firearm on. I have to make it a priority again so that my range training continues to improve.

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