1911 feeding problems

Hello gunner’s anyone else have trouble with defensive rounds in their 1911 ball ammo no trouble

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Yes, that is a typical problem. Polishing the feed-ramp should help.

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I polished my feed ramp, after that, no issue. Whether or not that was the problem, I don’t know, but it seemed to work so I’m happy.

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Yes, polishing feed ramp helps for sure.
I’m surprised you have feeding problem in 1911… :thinking: May I ask which 1911?

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Happened with my Kimber 45 auto

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It happened with my RIA factory barrel, but WC barrel was perfect.

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Remington r1 enhanced

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:+1:

I’ve never experiences feeding problems in any of 1911… but it may be because I never shoot out of the box :slightly_smiling_face:
All my handguns are inspected and “corrected” before first shot :slightly_smiling_face:

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Remington… :zipper_mouth_face:
Polish the ramp for sure :grin:

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In my defense, I cleaned it first. There was a tiny burr I didn’t initially see.

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I’ve just recalled - I corrected ramp angle and then polished it in my RIA. (that was suggested by a gunsmith, before I decided to made a purchase).
Handgun ate every ammo ever since then.

Like @Levi2 mentioned - Wilson Combat parts do not require any modifications… TG, 1911 parts are mostly interchangeable.

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On my Frankenstein 1911, most of the internals are WC. Other than the barrel, none of the parts gave me issues, I was just having fun with that pistol.

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I was just talking with a friend this last week about this very problem. He shoots computation with his 45 and started having this issue. Now he reloads his own ammo and cleans his weapon on a regular basis.

What he found was his magazine was dirty. He normally cleans once a year and had never had an issue before. He was using a new powder. After taking apart and cleaning his mags he no longer had a feed issue.

Hope this helps others out there if they cant find the cause of poor feeding.

Don

Edit for spelling errors

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Another possibility is extractor tension too high or too low.

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I was using 4 brand new magazine two from remington two from mec gar I think they make the magazine for remington

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The fact is that all handgun’s components have to be in good condition in order to cycling properly.
Feeding problem just out of box are mostly coming from feeding ramp.

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Polishing is fine but to get true reliability you need to recontour not only the feed ramp on the frame but also the mouth of the barrel. That being said you HAVE to KNOW what you are doing. Barrel support is paramount or you will start having bulged brass issues which means a new barrel. If done correctly you can feed an empty case from the magazine.

Cheers,

Craig6

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Don’t usually disagree with you @Jerzy, but extractor tension was the problem with my brand new Springfield last year. Springfield recut and polished the feed ramp with no improvement. I reduced the extractor tension and it got worse. I tightened it up till it worked with 3 different hollow points, Sig, Barnes, and Horiday. I will disclose it is a 9mm.

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You’re right. As I mentioned, mostly the ramp causes the problem. But not all 1911 are the same, and like you, there are probably more people who can experience extractor issue.
Good info, @Gary_H. :ok_hand: Thanks for pointing it out.

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I have found that just about 90% of 1911 feeding problems are magazine related. The rest are caused by either a weak recoil spring and a lot of times just shooting form by the user, and LAST and only in SOME RARE guns, truly a ramp issue.

If your magazines are good, and the recoil spring is fresh and strong enough, then you need to remember the 1911 requires a firm grip. If the gun is basically free recoiling when you fire it as some folks do, it does unwanted things to the slide travel during recoil and produces FTF and FTEs. The muzzle of a 1911 should never go up more than a fraction of an inch during recoil if shot properly.

I recently bought an original Colt Series 70 which I was TOLD (spelled warned) was a “jammomatic”. Basically a safe queen with a REALLY low round count because the previous owner never “trusted” the gun. I fired the first 7 rounds out of the gun with no issues right away. Obviously my new “jammomatic” showed promise.

Then I swapped the factory mag (Colt used to make horrible mags in the 70s-80s with old style military lips and crazy rough followers) with my Wilson Combat mags and proceeded to fire magazine after magazine of what I call my reliability “test mags”, with absolutely NO issues in over 300 rounds at all. There is NOTHING wrong with this gun and I’d bet my life on this.

So what are “test mags”? Follow me here… Basically I keep a big ammo can full of mixed whatever left over ammo I have in my garage. pretty much, if I’m shooting and there are less rounds in the open box than what it takes to fill a magazine I just open a new box and the leftovers of the first box get dumped into this “TEST ammo” can. Then I mix rounds in magazines for testing reliability in my new guns. So in one magazine I could have a couple of FMJs, some 230 HPs, some 180+p Has, some lead etc. See picture below.

In the last 20 or so years I have NEVER failed to achieve 100% reliability out of any of the many 1911s I’ve owned or own by using high quality magazines, good strong recoil springs and a proper grip. And this includes 1911’s going back to WW2 production which many folks say are notorious for not liking hollow points. I have proven time and time again this to be total a myth. And I’ve NEVER had to polish a ramp.

Happy shooting and I hope this helps.

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