What skills are you working on right now?

What skill are you currently working on in your training?

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Not stovepiping on the new Canik :woman_facepalming:
Less grip fidgeting, more repeatability
Sorting out my left/right eye swapping on open sights

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Is it still stovepiping, @Zee?

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75 rounds through the gun so far, of the last 50, 4 stovepipes. I’ll clean and oil it tomorrow morning and put another 150 or 200 rounds through it at the range and see how we’re doing. The hubby said get 500 rounds through before deciding if I need to make an adjustment on the spring. I modified my grip a little and that seems to have helped, plus I’m working on better wrist stability.

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Wrist stability can be the key with some guns, very true @Zee. Let us know how it goes.

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My LEO experience is from the early '70s when the revolver was standard armament…I have zero experience with semi-autos. My training right now consists of verifying my sight picture, eliminating flinching, trigger control, and controlling ‘range anxiety’(nerves). I also dry-fire around the house, working on procedure, ‘just in case’. I get to the range as often as I can, but a tight budget makes that option a rarity.

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Thank you for your service to your community, @Henry_A! Do you still carry a revolver?

Dry-fire may not be a 100% replacement for range time, but it is definitely valuable for your training - and very inexpensive! Glad you’re training!!

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Hi, @Dawn,
With the arthritis in my hands, I am guessing that I may not be able to pull the trigger on a revolver. My current EDC is a Taurus G2s in 9 mm. I do not have a way to measure it, but I am guessing the trigger pull is between 4 and 5lbs. This is much less than the trigger on the S&W ‘Combat Masterpiece’ that I used in the AF, which I swear was over 10lbs (and I was much younger then!!)

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Glad you’ve got one that works for your hands, @Henry_A! Just in case you are looking for a BUG or additional carry, I’ve heard really great things about the M&P 380 EZ from people who have arthritis and hand strength issues. It is a 380, but it is a reliable firearm that is easy to conceal.

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With your arthritis, you might also look at a Sig 238. 1911 style single action trigger, and being in .380, a very easy to manipulate slide. It has a nice tall, squared off rear sight that can be used to rack the slide one handed if necessary.

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My self defense training right now is concentrating on close, 10 to 12 feet, high speed shooting from the holster, if the range allows it, or else I hold it right beside my holster and try my best to mimic the exact motion that I would use to draw and then fire a quick double tap, no sights, in less than 1 second since that’s probably all the time you have left to live if you’re in an actual situation that would require lethal force. I’ve made the decision to only draw if I’m prepared to actually fire, no hesitation, if distance permits, or the person freezes, I’ll hold up, but one more aggressive move will likely be their last. I’ve been carrying for over 14 years and have never even been close to having to draw and I doubt if I ever will, I pray I never will, because I know my life will never be the same, nothing good can ever come from it.

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For me, my training is always about reinforcing the basics. I always “warm up” with slow fire drills that emphasize precision, trigger control, and grip. In between, I speed things up and work on good presentation from the holster. Double tap and transition drills at 21 feet are my bread & butter. Then, I cool down with the same drills that I started with. I try to attend the weekly pistol skill builder classes at my local range, which have helped me push my skill set beyond my basic practice drills.

^^^ This. Right here.

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Trying to get my levels up to what they were in the service. Speed, Accuracy, and perfect common sense.

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Awesome goals @Donald2… and welcome to the community!
What are your challenges in getting there?

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Getting back in shape,lol, Firing only when needed, First Aid in all levels that I had in the service. Keeping in mind that handgun is second use after the mind. Finally never miss any target when it is safe to fire. Never hit what I don’t want to. Since I am not in the service I had to read and study federal and state laws when I found out that after some training some judges might consider me a lethal weapon even if I have no gun or knife. I guess that would be the lawyers part because too many personal opinions are not realistic to facts. Now that I am a 50 year old grandfather, I want to be realistic to the facts that I have to train harder than I used to.

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Yeah, reclaiming that ground is harder than it looks!

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Yes it is . Look at it with humor and it gets better. Like I told my daughter, NEVER LET DEPRESSION OR STRESS CONTROL YOUR LIFE!

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Welcome to this great Community Donald2!!! Stress and Depression can kill you, never let it win!!!

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I agree. The calmer mind thinks faster and more realistic. I have found this to be great mental training since I was in 2nd grade in school, and it never got a chance to be let go of.

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