What advice would you give a new gun owner?

I will always recommend PROFESSIONAL training to all shooters, both new and experienced. It can be expensive (SIG Academy courses run about $250 per 8-hour day), but that investment will pay serious dividends in your techniques and mental mindset.

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After following ALL the great advice above, consider getting involved in some competitive shooting to get real life application experience like IDPA.

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I always wanted a smh button!! :wink:

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:woman_facepalming:

Like that one, @Brian? :wink:

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That’ll work @Dawn. I may wear it out though :laughing:

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Always, always stay focused, and study the 4 safety rules! Take a gun safety course first!

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Include the #3. RULE, please always. Good job, sir. Thank you.

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A firearm is like any other tool in the tool box. For example, my favorite impact gun that I use frequently, or my favorite ratcheting end wrench. Or in the kitchen my favorite coffee mug. What about your mode of transportation? Needs servicing, tires, needs to be in running order to support yourself and your family. Years ago, when I played pro ball, my coach told me to become one with the ball. Carry it daily, 24/7. Firearm. Become one. Know rules. Practice firearm safety. Shoot often. Take defensive shooting classes. Dry fire, with rules of firearm safety. Just the other day, my 21 yo helper has purchased this really kool handgun. Attempts to show it to me. I asked him the rules of firearm safety, then we went over the rules of firearm safety with him, clearly. Attempts to hand the firearm to me. I asked him to unload and show clear. The look on his face was priceless. He was dumbfounded. Frozen. We then went into an hour discussion on safety, concealed carry rules in our state, etc and so forth. I asked him where he cannot carry concealed. The look on his face was priceless again. Dumbfounded. Frozen. Deer in the headlights. We then proceeded more discussion. Yesterday, when I saw this young man, I asked him the rules of firearm safety. He remembered 2. I gave him a pencil and paper, and told him to write them down, keep the list in your pocket, memorize them. I then told him, this weekend we will shoot and train on our range. Oh, by the way, in his purchase of this firearm, this young man has huge hands, and a tiny firearm. Does it fit? I asked him, do you feel comfortable holding this in the work space, or holding in your hand? The look on his face was priceless. This young man is a good kid, smart, kind, volunteers, is on search and rescue, and has extreme potential, and a desire to learn. a possible future candidate for an instructor. As instructors, we see this above scenario often, and in daily life, the same scenario as well. Stay safe and train often, and please know the rules of firearm safety and practice them.

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@SKIdaho awesome job, raising up the newcomers right is critically important. Very cool that you’re not only informing him but coaching, checking, challenging him to see how much he doesn’t know and changing his awareness of what it means to make the carry choice. You are changing his perspective for life. Way to go! :green_heart:

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Thanks for sharing that @SKIdaho! That look was from someone who really wants to do it right. Can you imagine the look you’d get from someone who had nefarious intentions? They wouldn’t have cared in the least that he didn’t know what the safety rules were.

Please be sure to invite your friend to the USCCA Community! I know we’d all love to be there for him on his concealed carry journey!

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Take a class on firearms safety and a beginners shooting class if not already familiar with firearms and practice, practice, practice. Both at the range and dry firing. Always dry fire with no ammo in the room.

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Wear a brimmed hat to the range.


The new canik tends to throw brass on my head… forgot my hat :confused: collected a bit of hot brass inside my glasses. :roll_eyes:
Kept it pointed down range though. :+1:

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Ouch! I hate it when that happens!

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Read as much as you can on your new sidearm . Knowledge is power.

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Wow…! But, way to keep your weapon pointed down range… Bravo.

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@Zee and @Dawn, I was just going to say, “Where is the OUCH BUTTON?”

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45ipac I agree but with one caveat. Get training from a true, certified professional. Bad practice equals bad outcomes. I know, you should hear me play a guitar.

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Just make sure they are vetted very well. I know some NRA certified instructors that are every negative stereotype we all discuss in here. They are the first ones to do the “women can only handle 380s and revolvers” and bad advise like that. Sometimes, the best training might come from the friendly old gent or gal you met at the range.

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“Run Forrest Run.” I have been there and it is hot and painful, I wear glasses.
I wish to join all of you, Base Ball Cap, always. It gets worse as the ammo gets bigger.
and it also bounces off you head too,

Thank you,

William Smith

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I would highly recommend he become a member of the USCCA and take a private lesson where the trainer can help him/her one on one.

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