Tip: Keep your brass

Someday you may decide to start reloading. If not, you can recycle it for cash.

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Also giving it to someone who reloads helps them out as well, and they may just offer you back a deal on some finished product.

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I picked up 180 casings of .223, and 50 casings of 38 special at the range (i.e. BLM land) yesterday. Someone was feeling spendy (but not feeling considerate).

I do a little clean up every time I go to keep the place looking less like a trash dump. One day I’ll send it all to Capital Brass for cash, and buy myself something nice. :wink:

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@Mike270 >>> Some places will not take it because of possible live rounds mixed in.
Check first.
:us::us::us:

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All 22’s:

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Has anyone tried one of those brass catcher net/attachements?

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Never had good luck with them, myself. Usually, I setup a box on the bench to the ejection side of the gun far enough to catch the brass but not so close to interfere with my shooting. For off hand shooting, I spread an old sheet on the ground on the ejection side, which is pretty effective for catching most of my brass. Gather up the corners and you’re good to go.

Also, brass is not brass. These days, to a reloader, it’s GOLD. Cost of brass and bullets are the major costs in the reloading process. Example: 55 grain FMJ .223 cartridge. Brass: $89.00/500 Bullets: $69.00/500; 1 pound WINN 748 powder: $33.49 (loads 285 rnds @ 24.6 gr/3000 FPS); Primers: CCI small rifle primers: $79.00/1000. Doing the math= $0.51/ round. Primers are 2x the price of “normal” times. They used to run $0.035 each. If you already have the brass, the price per round drops to about $0.33/rnd.

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Saving brass is probably in my DNA!
When I was a college kid the local sporting goods store would trade spent brass+$ for reloads.
It really helped take the sting out of my ammo budget!

That store is long gone, but now I have my own press and loading tools :+1:

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I bend over and pick 'em up.
It’s better for my waist line :laughing:

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The places here check what you bring in.

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Just bring home some from every trip to the range, cull and inspect it, keep what you need and put the rest in a recycle box. Last month, I took in one-hundred pounds and received $200.00.

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@Mike270 >>> Use to be that way at my range but no more. Some times you get someone that doesn’t reload other than that slim Pickens here. I’m ok with brass for reloading and I have enough primers & powder to last a while but what’s a while. Long story short no primers no how no way.
:us::us::us:

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If you want to not bend over these work good for picking up brass. you could shop around for a better price.

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I have a few thousand rounds each of .357 Magnum, .38 Special and .45 ACP and 9mm Luger. In addition to 8,000 SP primers, 2,500 primed 9mm cases, 5 pounds of powder. All reloads. I still have thousands of .22 rimfire LR and Short (good for my model 63) from the last drought. I should have listened to a buddy that advised me to stock up more. Tons of .223 components too.

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That’s my technique, as well. I de-prime my junk brass and my recycle place puts a premium on clean brass, which is what they consider it to be when the primers are out.

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I consider junk to be things like cases made of aluminum, steel, military cases and certain commercial brands, cases bent beyond repair. The local recyclers do not care if spent primers are still present.

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Well that’s a lot of stooping and picking! :wink:

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Yup !!!

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I never got into reloading, but it’s a waste of money not to recycle.

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Send me your fired, send me your poor, Send me your brass masses yearning to be re-used. So, I can lift my gun in delight.

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