Sentimental Gun Love?

We all have our favorite gun. It might be your favorite because of how it feels when you shoot with it or because it has sentimental value. My uncle has my grandfather’s rifles and I hope I get them from my uncle at some point. I would love to have my grandfather’s firearms as I remember shooting with him when I was little.

Which of your firearms has the most sentimental value and why?

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My Rossi .38spcl snub nose. Let’s just say it was a life saver many many years ago.

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I have a Marlin 336 in 30.30 that was purchased from a widow whose husband has passed for $200.00 in 1983, it was in like new condition.
It has a Black Walnut stock that has a Tiger strip stippling,I use Tung oil hand rubbed on the wood.
I have lost count on the number of deer I have taken with it. So many hours carrying this rifle has given me a deep appreciation for its handling qualities.
When I pick it up all of those memories come back. :smiling_face_with_three_hearts:

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My Sig P229 Scorpion Enhanced Elite. My wife new how much I liked the classic P series and missed mine from years ago and picked one up for me at Christmas/Birthday/Anniversary a couple years back. That one will always be special for me.

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I own a .410/.22 over/under that belonged to my grandfather. The stock is cracked, so I will never shoot it. It belongs on the wall, and will get there one of these days.

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My grandpa’s guns[The one’s family did not pick out before got inheritance]

Nothing fancy, but its Remington 12 gauge as well 20 gauge which was mine when we would duck hunt [Among all of them those mean the most due to one particular time]

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My Winchester Model 12 12 gauge. The bluing is almost all gone, and there is basically no finish left on the wood. It is the shotgun I carried pheasant hunting since my youth. The gun was like new when my dad gave it to me. Some have suggested I refinish it. My reply is that every ding, scar, and worn off bluing and finish is a story from the countless hours afield with my dad, friends, favorite dogs, and other loved ones. I will never refinish the gun, and will never part with it.

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My grandfather’s 1894 win. In Cal. 32-40. It speaks to me of a great man cut from a mold that seems to be lost. I’ve fired it once with him (three rounds) and it hasn’t been fired since. That was 40 years ago and now I own it. Wow was it really that long ago? I have old hunting pictures of him posing with the rifle and deer he harvested. This rifle will be with me untill I to travel to the “Happy hunting grounds.” When I handle this rifle the memories of him overwhelm me and I can hear him speaking to me. Enough said. Very sentimental.

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Reload for it and shoot it. Lyman’s has recipes for the old lever guns. I have loaded 32-20 for my dad’s original Winchester 1873 manufactured in 1884. Was very special to shoot it with him after I made the cartridges for it.

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Brett, thank you for replying and I would love to shoot it again but I believe that the barrel is too far gone. If memory serves me correctly this was originally a black powder cartridge and I fear the powder did irrevocable damage. However if you’d like you may send me your reload data and I’ll smoke it over​:dash: , pun intended :wink:

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David, I know what you are talking about with the barrel. Dad’s 1873 was a rescue he got when he was 14. It was completely covered in rust. The barrel was trash. I scrubbed it using RB-17 and a brass brush, and cotton cloth. There aren’t any rifling left, but it is still really cool to shoot. I would give you my load data, but you said yours is a 32-40, while ours is 32-20. I will check the Lyman’s manual for 32-40 load data.

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Brett13 I’ve got a couple Lyman manuals as well as many others. Just thought your win.was same cal. As mine and I was being lazy🤔. Are you heading to the carry expo? I would really like to meet others of this community and I’ll be there. It’ll be my first.

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Yes, I will be there the 20-21st. Will be my first also.

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I’M there for all three days. Couldn’t get in on most of the seminars, their all full. But I’ll have my phone with me and we should try to grab a breakfast, lunch or dinner together? I have a friend that told me there is a great BBQ joint across the river in KS.

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My Parker 16 ga., I have 30+ years of memories in the field with it.

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Same situation with the seminars. Did find one that was open. I will have my phone as well.

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Sears and Roebuck (made by Marlin) 22. It was the first firearm I ever shot, even before I had a Crossman BB gun (the BB gun was the first I could shoot unsupervised).

The 22 used to be dads. A few months before he passed he was threatening to has the 22 tapped to be able to mount a scope on it as his eyes were not up to shooting iron sights any more. I said like heck you are and said I will buy you a 22 with a scope

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I’m 80 years old and have a 20 Gage shotgun and a 22 rifle my dad bought me when I was 14.

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I have a .410 shotgun my grandfather gave me. It was his when he was a boy. I took it to the range years ago and it’s a great reminder of the great man he was. My hero.

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If regret is a sentiment than trading my Colt Mk IV Series 70 in .38 Super. I had always wanted one when a kid. Finally got one and was disappointed with it’s inconsistent accuracy so I traded it. Wish I still had it. Found out within a couple months how to fix the problem. Currently my pet is a Marlin 336 C in .30-30 AI.

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