Proposed 'ghost gun' rule could reshape battle against homemade guns: Experts

New regulations coming on so-called “ghost guns.” A couple of takeaways from this article…

  1. New firearms regulations aren’t being proposed by the federal agency in charge of firearms (ATF), they’re being proposed by the DOJ. Interesting.

  2. DOJ will re-define “firearm” to include unfinished gun parts like frames and receivers. I’m curious how far this will go. Could ATF raid my home if I have sheet brass in my workshop?

  3. “There’s no question about it, that the regulation will shut down the marketplace going forward,” John Feinblatt, president of Everytown for Gun Safety, told ABC News.

Everytown for Gun Safety is full of morons. Maybe ATF should ask DEA how well criminals follow regulations.

  1. Pucino said his office has monitored ghost guns since 2017 in California, which is where ghost guns first sprouted. Due to California’s strict gun control laws, he said unserialized firearms became increasingly popular.

First, if he can monitor ghost guns, then that means they can be monitored, right? Doesn’t that undermine the fear of untraceable ghost guns?
And second, the article just made the case that unserialized firearms are a response to onerous firearm regulations. So how are more restrictive regulations going to help?

  1. “So (the ATF) indicated that the comments from (the firearm) industry were helpful, and made them think about things they hadn’t considered or thought about,” he said.

In an accidental case of journalism, we learn that the ATF didn’t really think through these regulations before proposing them.

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From the article:

“The Justice Department introduced the proposal last May in an effort to curb the rise of so-called ghost guns — unregulated, easy-to-make firearms that can be ordered online. Ghost guns often come in kits and many can be assembled within an hour.”

I’ve never built one, but I find it difficult to believe the average person has the ability to set up jigs, much less have the tools, to precisely execute the routing and drilling required to complete a functional 80% frame or receiver - especially “within an hour”. Thats all I’m going to say, trying to keep BP under control.

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Third World skills is all you need :man_shrugging:t4:

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Will this make casings and other parts ammunition? Spent casings? Shooting gloves?

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Are casings and other parts of ammunition, or shooting gloves, " parts like frames and receivers " or “other parts necessary to build a ghost gun.”?

I can’t speak to a hypothetical on a potential future law (or even a current law, I’m not a lawyer), but I don’t see shooting gloves or cases or any other ammunition parts as being a part needed to build a gun

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My rifle has a cotter pin in it. Waiting for someone to declare those “parts necessary.” :crazy_face:

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It was a bit of sarcasm. Give them an inch and all.

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A surprisingly good response reported on msn: Local gun store owner reacts to President Biden’s “ghost gun” rule (msn.com)

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This is no doubt headed for a court challenge. Both from a rule-making standpoint and from a legality standpoint.

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Wonder where that huge number came from? They also counted firearms with defaced serial numbers as ghost guns. Why would a criminal make a gun when stealing one is 100 times easier…

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What I wonder is when they are going after the entire franchise:

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Well, here comes another round of ghost guns. Do they really think criminals are sitting at home building kits, rather than just scratching off serial numbers?

200+ firearms stolen from Indianapolis area warehouses - WISH-TV | Indianapolis News

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Why did the police let them have those firearms without background checks? It seems that the police broke the law. :sunglasses:

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They already did.

Mysogenists made the first one. Misandrists the latter. lol

I refer us to Joe Jackson. If there’s a war between the sexes there’ll be no people left.

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Another random thought…
If I make my own firearm at home, it’s considered a “ghost gun.”
If I stamp a number on it, does that mean it’s no longer a ghost gun? Is it somehow safer than it was before I stamped it?

I remember my grandfather built a car in his garage, and the state would not sell him a license plate because it didn’t have a VIN. (He drove it, anyway.) What’s the fear regarding ghost guns? Is it just that they aren’t on the federal firearm registry that allegedly does not exist?

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I suspect the issue the government has is simply one of having less control over The People

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Did everyone see the one gentlemen that made a bunch of ghost guns then turned them to the Houston gun buy back? He made almost $10k. Classic.

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It seems in a few days the sale of 80% lowers will be a thing from the past.

Final Rule 2021R-05F - Definition of Frame or Receiver and Identification of Firearms (atf.gov)