Pocket Dump: RFID Blocking Wallet

Part of self-defense is keeping your private information private. There have been so many technological advancements that have made life easier for us - and easier for criminals. You could have your credit card stolen and it’s never even left your wallet… :frowning:

Do you use an RFID blocking wallet? If so, which is your favorite?

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guess it’s time to start wrapping the cards in heavy duty aluminium foil. I haven’t seen a Faraday cage except for some of the business card boxes but those are often too small to fit normal credit cards.

I’m looking forward to suggestions and recommended here soon.

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I have had one for several years now. Maybe it works? Don’t know for sure. The only security breach I have had was because of a hack at an ammo retailer. Couldn’t tell you the brand as the logo is no longer readable.

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Rollin old school with this… I don’t have any cards that can be read wirelessly. Chip cards are not RF capable, and some of my cards don’t even have chips. DL has a mag strip, but no RF.

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oh, and one thing to consider, while near field on a cell phone is totally cool, it’s good practice (if not convenient) to turn off NFC when you are done with the specific transaction you’ve decide to use it for.

it’s a funny thing, recently I’ve “turned on” Samsung Pay, and it’s an oddity to me that I find it THE top screen when I pick up my phone at any hour of the day… now what are the odds of this?

Unless the manufacturer set up the code so when it’s “ON” it’s also tied to a ‘hot key’ or ‘hot spot’ on the phone’s touch screen? S-of-a-B! and WTF? for icing! If it’s there for convenience - is that for Me? or Them? and who is Them anyhow?

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I have had a SERMAN from blocking minimalist wallet for about a year. It holds my non essential items including credit cards. My essentials are in an I’d wallet with only my license and LEOSA credentials.

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I actually have several.

I have one I carry my TX DL and LTC in, Another with my pocket passport, TX ID, and UT CP.

In the event I ever lose my primary wallet while waiting on those items to be replaced I can “carry on”.

My Cards and TX documents are part of my every day carry gear. I have a separate leather wallet for cash etc.

I prefer the light minimalist wallets with a pocket clip because I can carry them in a shirt or jacket breast pocket for easy access and so if stopped by LEO’s I never have to read anywhere near my carry gun to access them.

I use these.

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Trayvax 2.0 for me. My daily carry

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Hi,
You don’t have to buy special credit card holders. Take a piece of foil, three sheets of thickness. Fold the foil to a size just a little larger than a dollar bill. Put this in the back most spot in your wallet. When you fold your wallet, the foil covers all your credit cards. An RIFD reader can’t read anything covered with metal(foil).

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Silent Pocket is the way to go (https://silent-pocket.com/)

Great reputation for RFID blocking, quality products, and several different options for wallets (along with Faraday bags for RFID car fobs and cell phones).

Jeff

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This is what I have.

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Hi,
You can make your own RFID wallet at a cost less than $1.00. All you need is some aluminum foil. Cut a piece of foil that when folded at least three times is the size of a dollar bill. Put this in your wallet in the dollar section so it’s against the back of your wallet. When you fold your wallet, everything in between the outer sides will be shielded from a device that picks up your credit cards magnetic strip.

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You also want to disable or turn off Bluetooth.

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I’ve been using a Secrid wallet “Slimwallet” in vintage leather for the last few years. I really like it, and I’ve gotten a few compliments for it.

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using a RFID blocking wallet for your cards is the smart way to go. it has become to easy for someone to read your cards info just by walking by next to you. I use an American tourister slim card holder that holds all my cards, not that many 5, securely and blocks RFID readers. its slim enough to go unnoticed, its good looking leather, secure and I would recommend it . I found it at a local electronics supply store. I tried the individual card sleeves first but had trouble removing and re-inserting each card when I used it. so I found this slim leather holder thats much easier to use

It’s important to know what kind of information transmission you have on your cards - RFID, NFID (NFC), Chip(EMV), or Magnetic Strip.

Magnetic Strip can only be read by passing the strip along the reader - if you don’t slide it through the slot, it cant be read.

Chip cards require an electrical contact with the chip pads on the card and use an EVM protocol to “tokenize” your card information (basically like a substitution code where different numbers/characters are substituted for your cards numbers/characters in a programmatic way). If you don’t put your card in a slot with contacts to connect to the chip contact pads, it can’t be read.

NFID is Near Field ID - for this you hold your card very close to a sensor - say at a point-of-sale device - and a very short range radio wave transmits to your card chip, energizes it, and the chip transmits its information back… your information is on the broadcast radio wave and could be picked up by another VERY-close-by device. If the information is encrypted, then that device would have to break the encryption to access the card info. Some things like Apple Pan or Android Pay use this with an NFC protocol which tokenize (encode) your data to make it more secure.

Tap-and-pay cards and door access cards that are held against or near a sensor are typically NFC, and you have to be very close to the sensor (usually under 1.5 inches) for them to work.

RFID is longer range Radio Frequency ID and can be used for stimulating RFID devices to respond and broadcast their information over larger ranges. In some cases these RFID devices are powered, but mostly they are stimulated by the incoming RF and use that energy to do their broadcast with. Again, if an NFC protocol is used, the token encryption would have to be broken to use your card info… if you even had a card that did this.

Credit cards do not typically use actual RFID, but the ID chip in your pet might.

The “chips” they use in movies to track the undercover operator when the uber-villains kidnap him are definitely RFID. :wink:

If your credit card is either Chip (EVM) or magnetic strip, RFID skimming can’t occur. If you can just wave your card to pay for things, rather than inserting or sliding it, you might be vulnerable to a skimming attack, but if your card doesn’t do that, an RFID wallet is not protecting anything other than your sense of style. :grin:

I have Ridge Wallet but not because it’s RFID blocking! I wanted a slim wallet and it fit what I wanted.

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I’ve had RFID blocking wallets for years, even just the dirt cheap ones…

Even the Dirt Cheap RFID wallets blocked readers… I had an RFID card that I would have to take out of my wallet to scan several times a day… my wallet before the RFID I could stick the scanner near my pocket and read, the good old days…

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